Paul G. Bahn

Paul G. Bahn

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263
Publications
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3,222
Citations
Citations since 2017
10 Research Items
955 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150

Publications

Publications (263)
Article
The authors examine the arguments and validity of the conclusions of a recent statistical study of the chronology of human activity in Chauvet Cave. At first sight the study seems to present a considerable advance in the understanding of the cave's art, and, in particular, a validation of the arguments for an early (presumed Aurignacian) age for it...
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Full-text available
The decorated cave of Coliboaia in Romania has been claimed to date to the Aurignacian period, and to supply support for the Aurignacian attribution of France's Chauvet cave. In this paper, we examine the evidence and show that neither the radiocarbon dates obtained at Coliboaia nor the style and content of its cave art correspond to the Aurignacia...
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Courtney Nimura . Prehistoric rock art in Scandinavia. 2015. xii+141 pages, numerous colour and b&w illustrations. Oxford & Havertown (PA): Oxbow; 978-1-78570-119-1 paperback £25. - Volume 91 Issue 356 - Paul G. Bahn
Chapter
The corpus of Easter Island rock art, comprising several thousand designs (Lee 1992: 4), is one of the most impressive in Oceania. A wide array of motifs were executed on a large variety of carving surfaces - cave entrances and ceilings, house entrances, the inner side of paenga slabs delimiting houses, stones in the vicinity of water sources, moai...
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The article deals with the history of the discovery and recognition of Paleolithic "cave art outside the caves". Not all open-air rock images claimed to be Paleolithic, e.g. in Siberia, can be attributed to the Ice Age. Nonetheless, many of the petroglyphs discovered in Western Europe, beginning in the 1990s, have been recognized as Paleolithic by...
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Hunting for clues in the Palaeolithic - Sidéra Isabelle with Vila Emmanuelle & Erikson Phillippe (ed.) La chasse: pratiques sociales et symboliques (Colloques de la Maison René-Ginouvès). xiv+266 pages, 87 illustrations. 2006. Paris: De Boccard; 2-7018-0192-3 paperback. de Beaune Sophie A. (ed.) Chasseurs-cueilleurs: Comment vivaient nos ancêtres d...
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Floss Harald & Rouquerol Nathalie (ed.). Les chemins de l'art aurignacien en Europe/Das Aurignacien und die Anfänge der Kunst in Europa: Colloque international/Internationale Fachtagung, Aurignac 16-18 septembre 2005. 476 pages, numerous colour & b&w illustrations, 7 tables. 2007. Aurignac: Musée-forum d'Aurignac; 978-2-9527-444-2-3 hardback €59. -...
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Michel Barbaza . Les Trois Bergers. Du conte perdu au mythe retrouvé. Pour une anthropologie de l’art rupestre saharien. 2015. 270 pages, 206 colour and b&w illustrations. Toulouse: Presses Universitaires du Midi; 978-2-8107-0335-7 hardback €35. - Volume 89 Issue 347 - Paul G. Bahn
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Lorblanchet Michel . Lagrotte ornée de Pergouset (Saint Géry, Lot): un sanctuaire secret paléolithique (Documents d' Archéologie française 85). 192 pages, 157 figures, 7 tables. 2001. Paris: Maison des Sciences de l'homme; 2-7351-1802-3 (ISSN 0769-010X) paperback F200 & € 35.06. - Volume 75 Issue 289 - Paul G. Bahn
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Full-text available
Ice Age art: arrival of the modern mind - Cook Jill . Ice Age art: arrival of the modern mind. 288 pages, numerous illustrations. 2013. London: British Museum Press; 978-0-7141-2333-2 hardback £ 25. - Volume 87 Issue 337 - Paul Bahn, Paul Pettitt
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Full-text available
The pictograph discovered at Black Dragon Canyon, Utah, in the late 1920s, is a classic example of the Barrier Canyon style, dating probably to AD 1-1100. Creationists, however, have argued, from the incomplete preservation of the motifs, that it depicts a winged monster or pterosaur. A new study using portable X-ray fluorescence refutes this ill-f...
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The author draws attention to Gustave Chauvet's belief, 90 years ago, in Magdalenian weaving on the basis of ethnography, interpretation of Palaeolithic tools and motifs in portable art of the period.
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Human figures in portable art of the European Upper Palaeolithic - Volume 77 Issue 296 - Paul Bahn
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The authors have discovered small oval panel of parallel lines in the famous Ligurian cave of Arene Candide, and show that it must be art of the Epigravettian period, c. 11-10 000bp (uncalibrated).
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We are pleased to present here a preliminary account of the first discovery of Palaeolithic cave art in Britain. On 14 April 2003 we made the first discovery of Palaeolithic cave art in Britain. Since portable art of the period has long been known in this country (Sieveking 1972; Campbell 1977: vol. 2, figs 102, 105, 143), it has always seemed prob...
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Oliva Martin (ed.). Sídliště mamutího lidu, u Milovic pod Pálavou: otázka strukturs mamutími kostmi/Milovice, site of the mammoth people below the Pavlov hills: the question of mammoth bone structures (Studies in Anthropology, Palaeoethnology and Quaternary Geology 27, ns 19). 338 pages, numerous illustrations & tables, 49 colour plates. 2009. Brno...
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Full-text available
It is now 20 years since the discovery of the Grotte Chauvet with its impressive cave art, but controversy continues over the antiquity of the images. Radiocarbon assays have been used to argue that the ‘black series’ charcoal drawings date to the Aurignacian period, more than 20 000 years earlier than traditional stylistic models would suggest. Th...
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Full-text available
New discoveries of cave art at Chauvet and elsewhere have produced radiocarbon dates which may seem startlingly early and demand dramatic revision to the traditional stylistic sequence. The authors warn that the radiocarbon dates may themselves need better validation.
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Knut Helskog . Communicating with the world of beings. The World Heritage rock art sites in Alta, Arctic Norway. 240 pages, numerous colour and b&w illustrations. 2014 (first published in 2012 in Norwegian). Oxford & Philadelphia (PA): Oxbow; 978-1-78297-411-6 hardback £35. - Volume 89 Issue 343 - Paul G. Bahn
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In recent years there has been a refreshing move away from simplistic interpretations of Palaeolithic art: few scholars still adhere to the view of ‘art for art's sake’ or ‘totemism’, although many are reluctant to abandon the formerly dominant theory of ‘hunting magic’. The approach of Laming-Emperaire (1962) and Leroi-Gourhan (1965) is undoubtedl...
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Kuper Rudolph (ed.). Wadi Sura: the Cave of Beasts. A rock art site in the Gilf Kebir (SW-Egypt) (Africa Praehistorica 26). 542 pages, numerous colour illustrations, 2 foldouts. 2013. Cologne: Heinrich Barth Institut; 978-3-927688-40-7 hardback €85. - Volume 88 Issue 340 - Paul G. Bahn
Article
At first sight it may seem a pointless exercise to produce a survey of late Pleistocene ‘artistic activity’ around the world, but there are two specific aims involved here: first, to show that human beings in different parts of the world were producing ‘art’ at roughly the same time, i.e. from about 40,000 BC onward, and particularly at the end of...
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Full-text available
A series of undoubtedly Palaeolithic engraved figures have been recorded for the first time in the United Kingdom in Church Hole Cave, Creswell Crags. The first recorded images were thought initially to be two birds and a large ibex. This paper presents the preliminary results of the first systematic survey of the caves for engravings which identif...
Article
The name ‘Azilian’ is firmly linked to that of Edward Piette, the principal excavator of the site on the left bank of the river Arize in the tunnel-cave of the Mas d'Azil (Ariège), in the French Pyrenees (see Bahn 1979). From 1887 onward this site yielded hundreds of painted and engraved pebbles (Piette 1896, 1903). Their decoration shows little va...
Chapter
It is part of human nature to be interested in the past. The earliest known ‘archaeologist’ was Nabonidus, a 6th-century bc king of Babylon. The term itself was invented in the 17th century. ‘The origins and development of archaeology’ charts the history of the science and study of archaeology from its earliest origins through to the Roman Empire,...
Chapter
For a long time, human progress has been seen largely in terms of the technology of the era, as can be seen in the way we divide the past into ‘ages’. Most of what constitutes archaeological records is made up of man-made objects. ‘Technology’ looks at the ‘Palaeolithic’ technology, or ‘Old Stone Age’, which encompasses over 99% of the archaeologic...
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How do archaeologists pinpoint chronologies? Until recently there were two ways to do this: relative dating (placing objects, events etc in sequence) and historical dating (using written evidence). ‘Making a date’ examines the processes and methods of dating and looks at how these methods have changed. Until the late 20th century, the only dates av...
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Archaeologists ask a lot of ‘why’ questions. The range of approaches available to present-day archaeologists is reflected in the diversity of contemporary archaeological theory. This diversity is a strength and will lead to new discoveries. ‘How and why did things change?’ looks at how archaeology's attempts at explaining changes in the past have v...
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Since the 1970s, archaeologists (and anthropologists) have been faced with false accusations of racism, Eurocentrism, neocolonialism, grave-robbing, and male chauvinism. The archaeologist's right to dig was being questioned. The increased political power of native populations over the last few decades has led to their questioning the misdeeds carri...
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A scenario blaming rats for the devastation of Easter Island doesn't account for recent results, argues Paul Bahn.
Article
Full-text available
http://www.antiquity.ac.uk/projgall/kaagan330/
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. The legality of the archaeological investigation of ancient burials is currently receiving much attention in many parts of the world, and some areas it has become a politically sensitive issue; but the ethics involved in any archaeological disturbance of the dead rarely attract much discussion. This paper attempts to open the debate as to whether...
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In the first of this paper's two sections, Pyrenean evidence for contact between sites and with other regions is presented for each period of the Upper Palaeolithic. the examples include lithic, marine and artistic evidence. the results, presented in schematic maps, demonstrate the basic patterns of contact, and underline the role of the two ‘super...
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In a recent paper, one of us (Bahn 1984) made a preliminary sketch of the main issues involved in the question of whether archaeologists have the right to disturb the dead. Since then, a number of important new case studies have featured prominently in the media, and more literature on the subject has started to appear—most notably a collection of...
Chapter
On 14 April 2003, we made the first discovery of Palaeolithic cave art in Britain. Since portable art of the period had long been known in this country (Sieveking 1972; Campbell 1977: vol. 2, figs. 102, 105, 143), it had always seemed probable that parietal art must also have existed. It was fairly obvious that paintings were unlikely to be discove...
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Cave art is a subject of perennial interest among archaeologists. Until recently it was assumed that it was largely restricted to southern France and northern Iberia, although in recent years new discoveries have demonstrated that it originally had a much wider distribution. The discovery in 2003 of the UK's first examples of cave art, in two caves...
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Are cave paintings really little more than the testosterone-fuelled scribblings of young men?
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Full-text available
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This paper presents a number of challenges to the Three Stages of Trance (TST) or the neuropsychological model proposed by Lewis-Williams and Dowson, a model whose popularity far exceeds its empirical foundations. Lewis-Williams and Dowson have written as if the TST model had been accepted as fact throughout South Africa but this is not the case as...
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Full-text available
Engravings representing Britain's first apparently Pleistocene cave art were discovered in Church Hole and Robin Hood caves, Creswell Crags. Representations of a deer, highly stylised females or birds and vulvae were engraved into the bedrock, and in some cases had been covered with a thin layer of flowstone. In the absence of radiocarbon datable p...
Article
Full-text available
Engravings representing Britain's first apparently Pleistocene cave art were discovered in Church Hole and Robin Hood caves, Creswell Crags. Representations of a deer, highly stylised females or birds and vulvae were engraved into the bedrock, and in some cases had been covered with a thin layer of flowstone. In the absence of radiocarbon datable p...
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Research on Pleistocene art is a dynamic and thriving area. Many new advances and discoveries have been made since the last major review of this topic.1 Indeed, thanks to the introduction of direct dating and detailed analysis of pigments, the last few years can arguably be described as the most exciting and most important phase in Ice Age art stud...
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In October of 2002, Patricia A. Helvenston and Paul G. Bahn published a paper entitled ‘Desperately Seeking Trance Plants: Testing the “Three Stages of Trance” Model’. That paper presented a critique of the ‘Three Stages of Trance’ model as proposed by J.D. Lewis-Williams and T.A. Dowson in 1988 to account for mental imagery as perceived by people...

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