Paul Arthur

Paul Arthur
Edith Cowan University

Doctor of Philosophy

About

56
Publications
5,325
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
133
Citations
Introduction
Paul Arthur is Vice-Chancellor’s Professorial Research Fellow and Chair in Digital Humanities and Social Sciences, at Edith Cowan University, Western Australia. He speaks and publishes widely on major challenges and changes facing 21st-century society, from the global impacts of technology on culture and identity to migration and human rights. Since 2017 he has been Director of the Edith Cowan Centre for Global Issues.

Publications

Publications (56)
Article
Full-text available
During the twenty-first century, for the first time, the volume of digital data has surpassed the amount of analog data. As academic practices increasingly become digital, opportunities arise to reshape the future of scholarly communication through more accessible, interactive, open, and transparent methods that engage a far broader and more divers...
Article
Full-text available
Open research represents a new set of principles and methodologies for greater cooperation, transparent sharing of findings, and access to and re-use of research data, materials or outputs, making knowledge more freely available to wider audiences for societal benefit. Yet, the future success of the international move toward open research will be d...
Article
Full-text available
Open scholarship encompasses open access, open data, open source software, open educational resources, and all other forms of openness in the scholarly and research environment, using digital or computational techniques, or both. It can change how knowledge is created, preserved, and shared, and can better connect academics with communities they se...
Article
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
Review of Building Equitable Access to Knowledge Through Open Access Repositories, by Nikos Koutras. IGI Global, Hershey, Pennsylvania, 2020, 333 pp., $144.00, Hardcover, ISBN 9781799811312.
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper reports on an Australian project that is developing an online system to deliver researcher-driven national-scale infrastructure for the humanities, focused on mapping, time series, and data integration. Australian scholars and scholars of Australia worldwide are well served with digital resources and tools to deepen the understanding of...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Cambridge History of Travel Writing - edited by Nandini Das January 2019
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter traces the development of digital humanities in Australia, with reference to major projects, events, and the establishment of the Australasian Association for Digital Humanities (aaDH). It begins by referring to national exemplar projects that predate the establishment of the association in 2011, as well as to major events and initiati...
Chapter
Australia is recognised as one of the world’s most culturally and ethnically diverse nations. Immigration has historically played an important role in the nation’s economic, social and cultural development. There is a pressing need to find innovative technological and archival approaches to deal with the challenge to digitally preserve Australia’s...
Article
Full-text available
Migrants all over the world have left multiple traces in different countries, and this cultural heritage is of growing interest to researchers and to the migrant communities themselves. Cultural heritage institutions, however, have dwindling funds and resources to meet the demand for the heritage of immigrant communities to be protected. In this ar...
Chapter
Full-text available
Australia is recognised as one of the world's most culturally and ethnically diverse nations. Immigration has historically played an important role in the nation's economic, social and cultural development. There is a pressing need to find innovative technological and archival approaches to deal with the challenge to digitally preserve Australia's...
Book
On 6 and 7 November 2017 researchers from all over the world gathered in Linz, Austria, for the second conference on Biographical Data in a Digital World. The conference included 16 oral presentations and 10 poster presentations. These proceedings contain 13 fully reviewed papers that are based on the presentations given during this event. http://c...
Article
Full-text available
We are in the midst of a data revolution that has penetrated the daily life of most of the world's population so suddenly and deeply that it is impossible to grasp the extent of its impact on the concepts of self and identity. At the same time as accessing the ever-expanding realm of data via our networked devices, we are also contributing to it wi...
Article
Full-text available
This essay investigates how the digital medium has recently enabled radical changes in the ways that national biography can be generated and engaged with. It takes the position that national biography, whether or not it sets out to do so, reflects how a nation views itself. The Australian Dictionary of Biography (ADB) has been produced continuously...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past two decades, memory, understood as both the act of remembering and a means of storing memories, has been relocating itself. In its daily usage it has been moving from the mind to the computer—from neurological systems to digital technologies—as people increasingly outsource memory to digital devices. In this essay I focus on the chang...
Chapter
Full-text available
From the beginning of known human history people have devised ways of providing enduring links between the living and the dead. In this century, as people increasingly live online, archives are being generated for them, mostly without their knowledge. For those who are no longer alive, these remnants and traces form an automatically generated obitu...
Article
Full-text available
It may be that the digital revolution has had a more profound effect on biography than any other branch of the arts. At the intersection of life writing and digital humanities, key questions can be posed: In what ways does the Web act to co-shape identities? How permanent are digital records of lives? Will we soon remember differently?
Article
Full-text available
The act of translation is the defining communicative process of our era. With mass migration and mobility on an unprecedented scale—changing concepts of place, identity, and nation—and the rapid rise of digital communication technologies, translation in its many forms has become a fundamental requirement for living in a globalised world. Translatio...
Article
Full-text available
My Ukrainian grandparents Nadia and Petro Olijnyk arrived in Australia as post-war refugees in 1949. Petro died in 2005 and Nadia in 2009, each in their mid-90s. My grandfather loved telling stories and holding an audience. Nadia would sit with him, listening, but Petro would never allow her to take over. However, when he was not with her she would...
Book
Overview of digital humanities research that demonstrates the capacity of digital methods to advance research in a variety of disciplines (rather than just to speak about itself)
Article
Full-text available
Chapter
Full-text available
By any measure biography is popular today. With films, dedicated television channels, books, magazines, and multiple forms of social media disseminating biographical information online at an unprecedented rate and feeding an ever-escalating interest in the lives of real people, intense public engagement with biography may be considered a defining f...
Chapter
Full-text available
The first “Digital Death Day,” held on 20 May 2010, brought together world experts in the fields of death studies, social networking, and data management. Promoting the event, coordinator Jennifer Holmes commented, “The online memorial has already become the new grave” (Andrews 2010). How seriously should we take such a statement? Was this turn of...
Chapter
Full-text available
Digital humanities has become an influential and widely adopted term only in the past decade. Beyond the rapid multiplication of associations, centres, conferences, journals, projects, blogs, and tweets frequently used to signal this emergence, if anything characterizes the field during this time it is a concern with definition. This focus is ackno...
Article
Full-text available
Review of Seeking Wisdom: A Centenary History of Western Australia, edited by Jenny Gregory. UWA Publishing, Crawley, 2013, 488 pp.
Chapter
Full-text available
E-Research is well-established in science and technology fields but is at an earlier stage of development in the humanities. Investments in technology infrastructure worldwide, however, are starting to pay dividends, and a cultural change is occurring, enabling closer collaborations between researchers in a sector that has traditionally emphasized...
Article
Full-text available
When Hitler’s troops invaded and occupied the city of Kharkov in Ukraine, my grandparents Nadia, 26, and Petro, 30, had two young children, aged 7 and 5. My mother had not yet been born. In this tense and uncertain period it was unclear whether Ukraine would ultimately be controlled by Stalin or Hitler. There was nothing to recommend one over the o...
Chapter
Full-text available
Digital history spans disciplines and can take many forms. Computer technology started to revolutionize the study of history more than three decades ago, and yet genres and formats for recording and presenting history using digital media are not well established and we are only now starting to see large-scale benefits. New modes of publication, new...
Article
Full-text available
This exhibition celebrates the 350th anniversary of the Royal Society of London and the South Seas. However, rather than documenting the history of the society, it focuses on an assortment of artefacts that characterise the era of antipodean exploration.
Article
Full-text available
Review of The Historical Encyclopedia of Western Australia, edited by Jenny Gregory and Jan Gothard. University of Western Australia Press, Crawley, 2009, 1015 pp.
Article
Full-text available
Review of Gallipoli: The First Day, ABC 3D documentary site, Creative Director / Executive Producer: Sam Doust. Visit online: http://www.abc.net.au/innovation/gallipoli.
Article
Full-text available
This article considers how traditional physical memorials to war and other catastrophic events differ from online memorials in the Web 2.0 environment and it asks what the benefits and drawbacks of each may be. There has always been an awkward fit between the public statements embodied in monuments to those who died in war and the personal stories...
Article
Full-text available
This paper gives an overview of the ways that humanities research is embracing new digital resources and formats and suggests that the e-research revolution that is well advanced in the sciences is at an early stage in the humanities. Many of its potential benefits, and challenges, are different from those in the sciences and are just beginning to b...
Article
The “imaginary voyage” was an early form of the modern realist novel popular in Britain and France from the seventeenth to the early nineteenth centuries, set predominantly in the region of Australasia and the Pacific. As a branch of travel literature, it was linked intimately to the expansion of empire. Through repeated stories of successful colon...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this first decade of the twenty-first century we are caught up in the midst of a technological shift of the kind that Walter Benjamin, in his 1936 essay ‘The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction’, attributed to the increasing popularity of photography in the early twentieth century. The essence of that change was the unprecedented c...
Article
Full-text available
The unexplored regions of the southern hemisphere, known as the ‘antipodes’, existed in the European imagination for at least two thousand years before Europeans set foot on antipodean lands. By that time this distant and elusive place had inspired a vast and varied mythology. Rival European nations, with different aims and agendas, each had their...
Article
Full-text available
The article focuses on the impact of digital media on the recording and presentation of oral history. It discusses some issues such as the finance for oral history research, the problems associated with maintaining and updating digital histories and the demands of interdisciplinary collaboration in Australia. It also looks into some oral history pr...
Article
Australia and the South Pacific held a special status in the eighteenth century: this was the farthest region from Europe and the last part of the earth remaining for Europeans to explore and chart. In the context of European nations’ own histories of discovering and exploring the world beyond Europe's borders, this region is unique in the sense th...
Article
Online environments provide public spaces for expressing, sharing and working through experiences of trauma and crisis. New communities are created and new kinds of records and histories are produced. What happens when private trauma is made public? What does online commemoration achieve? What kinds of communities are created and how are these diff...

Network

Cited By