Patrick Veiga

Patrick Veiga
Danone Nutriticia Research · Innovation Science & Nutrition

phD

About

44
Publications
18,334
Reads
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5,316
Citations
Introduction
Diet is the most attainable approach for modulating the gut microbiome at the population scale. There is a need to understand which dietary patterns or components (fibers, prebiotics, polyphenols, fermented foods, probiotics, etc.) are critical to favor the human–gut microbiome symbiosis. Are those relevant across different countries, cuisines, cultures, and traditions?
Additional affiliations
January 2017 - present
Danone Nutricia Research
Position
  • Head of Department
September 2011 - October 2018
Harvard University
Position
  • Researcher
March 2008 - December 2016
Danone
Position
  • Senior Researcher

Publications

Publications (44)
Article
Objectives We assessed the utility of representing dietary intake data in hierarchical tree structures that consider relationships among foods. Methods Dietary intake was collected from 1909 adults (≥18 years) using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ; VioScreen) from the American Gut Project. FFQ food items were formatted into hierarchical tree s...
Article
Full-text available
Background Yoghurt contains live bacteria that could contribute via modulation of the gut microbiota to its reported beneficial effects such as reduced body weight gain and lower incidence of type 2 diabetes. To date, the association between yoghurt consumption and the composition of the gut microbiota is underexplored. Here we used clinical variab...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Individual diet components and specific dietary regimens have been shown to impact the gut microbiome. Objective: Here, we explored the contribution of long-term diet by searching for dietary patterns that would best associate with the gut microbiome in a population-based cohort. Methods: Using a priori and a posteriori approaches,...
Article
Objectives Eating habits have been shown to impact the gut microbiome. Here we aimed to define several types of dietary patterns in a U.S. adult cohort and test their associations with the gut microbiome. Methods Using supervised and unsupervised approaches, we built dietary patterns based on a food frequency questionnaire of the American Gut Proj...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Yoghurt contains live bacteria that could contribute via modulation of the gut microbiota to its reported beneficial effects such as reduced body weight gain and lower incidence of type 2 diabetes. To date, the association between yoghurt consumption and the composition of the gut microbiota is underexplored. Here we used clinical varia...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Yoghurt contains live bacteria that could contribute via modulation of the gut microbiota to its reported beneficial effects such as reduced body weight gain and lower incidence of type 2 diabetes. To date, the association between yoghurt consumption and the composition of the gut microbiota is underexplored. Here we used clinical varia...
Article
Objectives Fermented foods have gained much attention due to their proposed gut health benefits from recent clinical trials. However, very few studies have explored the effects of fermented foods, especially of plant origin, on gut microbiota composition and functional capacity in large human cohorts. Thus, the objective of this study was to assess...
Article
Full-text available
A precision approach to probiotics could address the heterogeneity inherent to probiotic strains, the hosts and their microbiomes. Here, we discuss the steps required to develop precision probiotics: mechanistic studies, phenotypic and target-based discovery strategies, and person-centric trials.
Article
Full-text available
Public interest in the effects of fermented food on the human gut microbiome is high, but limited studies have explored the association between fermented food consumption and the gut microbiome in large cohorts. Here, we used a combination of omics-based analyses to study the relationship between the microbiome and fermented food consumption in tho...
Article
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Dietary lipids favor the growth of the pathobiont Bilophila wadsworthia, but the relevance of this expansion in metabolic syndrome pathogenesis is poorly understood. Here, we showed that B. wadsworthia synergizes with high fat diet (HFD) to promote higher inflammation, intestinal barrier dysfunction and bile acid dysmetabolism, leading to higher gl...
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Technical variation in metagenomic analysis must be minimized to confidently assess the contributions of microbiota to human health. Here we tested 21 representative DNA extraction protocols on the same fecal samples and quantified differences in observed microbial community composition. We compared them with differences due to library preparation...
Article
Hosts and their microbes have established a sophisticated communication system over many millennia. Within mammalian hosts, this dynamic cross-talk is essential for maintaining intestinal homeostasis. In a genetically susceptible host, dysbiosis of the gut microbiome and dysregulated immune responses are central to the development of inflammatory b...
Article
Modern life is associated with changes in gut microbial communities, believed to be involved in the emergence of non-communicable chronic diseases. While there is an increasing effort of the scientific community towards designing microbiota-targeting therapies aiming to restore the microbiota of diseased patients, there is a lack of approaches desi...
Article
Full-text available
The spread of the Western lifestyle has been accompanied by microbial changes thought to underlie the emergence of chronic, nontransmissible, immune-related diseases. The past decade has seen the unprecedented development of therapies for 'replenishing' the microbiota of sick individuals. However, functional and ecological solutions helping the hos...
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To ensure optimal cell growth and separation, and to adapt to environmental parameters, bacteria have to maintain a balance between cell wall (CW) rigidity and flexibility. This can be achieved by a concerted action of peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases and PG synthesizing/modifying enzymes. In a search for new regulatory mechanisms responsible for the...
Article
Full-text available
Resident gut microbes co-exist with transient bacteria to form the gut microbiota. Despite increasing evidence suggesting a role for transient microbes on gut microbiota function, the interplay between resident and transient members of this microbial community is poorly defined. We aimed to determine the extent to which a host's autochthonous gut m...
Article
Full-text available
Beneficial microbes that target molecules and pathways, such as oxidative stress, which can negatively affect both host and microbiota, may hold promise as an inflammatory bowel disease therapy. Prior work showed that a five-strain fermented milk product (FMP) improved colitis in T-bet(-/-) Rag2(-/-) mice. By varying the number of strains used in t...
Article
Full-text available
The gut microbiota (GM) consists of resident commensals and transient microbes conveyed by the diet but little is known about the role of the latter on GM homeostasis. Here we show, by a conjunction of quantitative metagenomics, in silico genome reconstruction and metabolic modeling, that consumption of a fermented milk product containing dairy sta...
Article
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Dysregulated immune responses to gut microbes are central to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and gut microbial activity can fuel chronic inflammation. Examining how IBD-directed therapies influence gut microbiomes may identify microbial community features integral to mitigating disease and maintaining health. However, IBD patients often receive m...
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We are facing a global metabolic health crisis provoked by an obesity epidemic. Here we report the human gut microbial composition in a population sample of 123 non-obese and 169 obese Danish individuals. We find two groups of individuals that differ by the number of gut microbial genes and thus gut bacterial richness. They contain known and previo...
Article
Full-text available
We are facing a global metabolic health crisis provoked by an obesity epidemic. Here we report the human gut microbial composition in a population sample of 123 non-obese and 169 obese Danish individuals. We find two groups of individuals that differ by the number of gut microbial genes and thus gut bacterial richness. They contain known and previo...
Article
Full-text available
Adaptation of cells to environmental changes requires dynamic interactions between metabolic and regulatory networks, but studies typically address only one or a few layers of regulation. For nutritional shifts between two preferred carbon sources of Bacillus subtilis, we combined statistical and model-based data analyses of dynamic transcript, pro...
Article
Full-text available
Intestinal health requires the coexistence of eukaryotic self with the gut microbiota and dysregulated host-microbial interactions can result in intestinal inflammation. Here, we show that colitis improved in T-bet(-/-)Rag2(-/-) mice that consumed a fermented milk product containing Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis DN-173 010 strain. A decrea...
Article
Full-text available
Plasmid pBaSysBioII was constructed for high-throughput analysis of gene expression in Bacillus subtilis. It is an integrative plasmid with a ligation-independent cloning (LIC) site, allowing the generation of transcriptional gfpmut3 fusions with desired promoters. Integration is by a Campbell-type event and is non-mutagenic, placing the fusion at...
Article
Lactococcus lactis is one of the main components of the starter cultures used in cheese manufacture. As starter, L. lactis must tolerate harsh conditions encountered either during their production in bulk quantities or during dairy products processing. To face these hostile conditions, bacteria monitor the environment and respond by modifying gene...
Article
Full-text available
We show that in Lactococcus lactis, the gene asnH encodes the asparagine synthase involved in amidation of d-Asp present in peptidoglycan side chains and crossbridges. The level of d-Asp amidation in peptidoglycan has a strong effect on the sensitivity of bacteria to endogenous autolysins and to the cationic antimicrobials nisin and lysozyme.
Article
Full-text available
Endogenous peptidoglycan (PG)-hydrolyzing enzymes, the autolysins, are needed to relax the rigid PG sacculus to allow bacterial cell growth and separation. PGs of pathogens and commensal bacteria may also be degraded by hydrolases of animal origin (lysozymes), which act as antimicrobials. The genetic mechanisms regulating PG resistance to hydrolyti...
Article
Bacteria such as Lactococcus lactis have D-aspartate (D-Asp) or its amidated derivative D-asparagine (D-Asn), in their peptidoglycan (PG) interpeptide crossbridge. We performed a subtractive genome analysis to identify L. lactis gene yxbA, orthologues of which being present only in bacteria containing D-amino acids in their PG crossbridge, but abse...
Article
Bacteria such as Lactococcus lactis have d-aspartate (d-Asp) or its amidated derivative d-asparagine (d-Asn), in their peptidoglycan (PG) interpeptide crossbridge. We performed a subtractive genome analysis to identify L. lactis gene yxbA, orthologues of which being present only in bacteria containing d-amino acids in their PG crossbridge, but abse...
Article
Full-text available
The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is the most important identified virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a human pathogen of the upper respiratory tract. One limitation in studies of S. pneumoniae surface virulence factors is the lack of a reliable procedure for isolation of capsule-negative mutants of clinical strains. This paper presents...
Article
Intensity of the cholesterol-to-coprostanol conversion in the intestine, as assessed by the coprostanol-to-cholesterol ratio in faeces, was found highly variable among 15 human volunteers, ranging from absent to almost complete cholesterol conversion. The number of coprostanoligenic bacteria in the same faecal samples, as estimated by the most prob...

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