Patrick Hurley

Patrick Hurley
Ursinus College · Environmental Studies

PhD, Environmental Studies, Science and Policy

About

44
Publications
13,951
Reads
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1,827
Citations
Introduction
I am a social scientist who uses methods in human geography to study the ways that humans interact with and effect environmental change. In particular, I focus on urban and urbanizing areas, exploring social dimensions of planning, conservation, and resource use. Recently, I have been studying exurbanization and forest change in southeastern PA, urban nontimber forest product use in Philadelphia and New York City, and amenity migration and natural resource politics in western Turkey.
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - present
Ursinus College
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 2013 - present
Ursinus College
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Teach courses on globalization, human-forest interactions, urbanization, political ecology, and urban sustainability.
August 2008 - July 2013
Ursinus College
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
August 2001 - October 2004
University of Oregon
Field of study
  • Environmental Science, Studies and Policy

Publications

Publications (44)
Article
Full-text available
Informal foraging for food and other natural materials in urban greenspaces is an activity undertaken by many across the world. For some, foraging is a necessary means of survival and livelihood, while for others, it provides cultural and recreational opportunities. In the socioeconomic crises induced by Covid-19, foraging can help communities, esp...
Article
Urban greenspaces (UGS) are increasingly recognized for their potential to provide provisioning services to residents foraging for food and other plant materials. The alignment of tree species composition with foraging practices in cities, and the provisioning services harvesters derive, in UGS remains less well studied. To address this gap, we dra...
Article
Diverse forms of conservation and development are transforming the material landscapes and related livelihoods of communities in rural places around the world. While many studies focus on changing protected area governance and ecotourism efforts associated with nature protection, other studies focus on residential development in areas experiencing...
Article
Full-text available
The practice of gathering and harvesting wild foods has seen renewed interest in recent decades. In addition to contributing to food security and food sovereignty, foraging plays a role in promoting socioecological resilience and creating communities of belonging. However, foraging is generally prohibited by regulations governing public lands in th...
Article
Full-text available
Scholarship on the ecosystem services provided by urban forests has focused on regulating and supporting services, with a growing body of research examining provisioning and cultural ecosystem services from farms and gardens in metropolitan areas. Using the case of New York, New York, USA, we propose a method to assess the supply of potential provi...
Article
Full-text available
Expanding cities present a sustainability challenge, as the uneven proliferation of hybrid landscape types becomes a major feature of 21st century urbanization. To fully address this challenge, scholars must consider the broad range of land uses that being produced beyond the urban core and how land use patterns in one location may be tied to patte...
Article
Full-text available
Although hardly noticed or formally recognised, urban foraging by humans probably occurs in all urban settings around the world. We draw from research in India, South Africa, Sweden, and the United States to demonstrate the ubiquity and varied nature of urban foraging in different contexts. Across these different contexts, we distil seven themes th...
Article
Exurban political ecologists (ExPE) are interested in landscape contestations, particularly where material–cultural entanglements play out through land-use decision-making processes. ExPE research highlights the role in-migrants and long-time residents play in the balance between conservation and development of landscapes, often highlighting inform...
Article
Full-text available
Description: More than half the world's human population resides in cities (United Nations Economic and Social Affairs Population Division 2015)1. Unpacking this singular statistic, it becomes clear that people come to live in urban environments via numerous routes. Some have lived in cities all their lives and are descendants of city dwellers. In...
Article
Gathering non-timber forest products (NTFPs) in cities and rural areas has received growing attention inresearch and news media. Yet little is known about the frequency of these activities and how attitudesabout and the practice of gathering differ across urban, suburban, and rural areas. We report on findingsfrom a mail survey of landowners across...
Chapter
Scholars of ecological and social change have wrestled in recent years with the emergence of a particular kind of place beyond cities and suburbs where urban and rural are “intermingled” or “fused,” a place increasingly referred to as “exurbia.” This introductory chapter to A Comparative Political Ecology of Exurbia outlines the main goals of this...
Chapter
Communities around the world face similar pressures for change when experiencing the transition from rural to exurban, but they deal with these pressures in very different ways. As discussed in the Introduction, economic shifts on a global scale result in the decline of productive activities, such as agriculture and forestry, and in places with gre...
Chapter
In 2007, in the midst of the global building boom, County Commissioners in rural Jackson County, North Carolina passed new land-use regulations to limit steep slope development in the Appalachian Mountains. The zoning ordinance is considered the strictest in the state and has become a model for other western North Carolina counties where the transi...
Chapter
The purpose of this book is to provide a comparative political ecological study of exurbia. Our analytical focus throughout the book has been the dynamics of competing rural capitalisms in exurbanizing landscapes of the United States and Australia. As the cases in the book illustrate, the rural to exurban transition appears at different times in di...
Book
Cultural geography has a long and proud tradition of research into human–plant relations. However, until recently, that tradition has been somewhat disconnected from conceptual advances in the social sciences, even those to which cultural geographers have made significant contributions. With a number of important exceptions, plant studies have been...
Article
Full-text available
Cambridge Core - Environmental Policy, Economics and Law - Sustainability in the Global City - edited by Cindy Isenhour
Article
Full-text available
Through a discussion of urban foraging in Seattle, Washington, USA, we examine how people’s plant and mushroom harvesting practices in cities are linked to relationships with species, spaces, and ecologies. Bringing a relational approach to political ecology, we discuss the ways that these particular nature–society relationships are formed, legitim...
Article
Full-text available
Recent “green” planning initiatives envision food production, including urban agriculture and livestock production, as desirable elements of sustainable cities. We use an integrated urban political ecology and human–plant geographies framework to explore how foraging for “wild” foods in cities, a subversive practice that challenges prevailing views...
Article
Full-text available
Using a political ecology framework, this chapter examines the ways in which sense of place and amenity migration contributes to alternative residential development, which relies on uneven use of conservation subdivision features in the American West. Based on case studies from Central Oregon, this chapter demonstrates how senses of place and devel...
Article
Despite the visibility of natural resource use and access for indigenous and rural peoples elsewhere, less attention is paid to the ways that development patterns interrupt non-timber forest products (NTFPs) and gathering practices by people living in urbanizing landscapes of the United States. Using a case study from Lowcountry South Carolina, we...
Article
Full-text available
Urban forests are multifunctional socio-ecological landscapes, yet some of their social benefits remain poorly understood. This paper draws on ethnographic evidence from Seattle, Washington to demonstrate that urban forests contain nontimber forest products that contribute a variety of wild foods, medicines, and materials for the wellbeing of urban...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The past decade has seen resurgence in interest in gathering wild plants and fungi in cities. In addition to gathering by individuals, dozens of groups have emerged in U.S., Canadian, and European cities to facilitate access to nontimber forest products (NTFPs), particularly fruits and nuts, in public and private spaces. Recent efforts within citie...
Article
Scholars working around the world have drawn attention to the physical and social changes associated with rural gentrification. Case studies from the United States have focused on how these patterns lead to the cultural displacement and replacement of land-based livelihoods, including non-timber forest product (NTFP) practices. Scholars have also d...
Article
Opposition to mining activities is an increasingly global phenomenon. A key feature of political ecology literature examining this opposition is its focus on the power of multinational corporations to gain access to resources on lands principally claimed by indigenous peoples and peasants in ‘Third World’ countries. These struggles often play out w...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of urbanization by amenity migrants on natural resource uses in the Edremit Bay area of Balikesir, Turkey. The Edremit Bay Region is attarcted to a considerable number of amenity migrants because of its perceived value of natural, cultural, archeological and historical resourses. These amenity mig...
Article
Full-text available
Collaborative natural resource management (CNRM) is often portrayed as a way to find “win–win” solutions that move “beyond ” bitter adversarial politics. Research on failures of CNRM emphasizes institutional and procedural barriers. In contrast, using a study of a failed CNRM program in Nevada County, California, we emphasize the role of intracommu...
Article
Full-text available
Management challenges related to the relationship between nature and society are nothing new in the U.S. South. Technical studies of rural sprawl (Wear and Greis 2002; Cho et al. 2003), coastal development (Allen and Lu 2002), environmental change (TNC 2005; Early 2006), and conservation have, at some level, addressed such challenges. So, too, a nu...
Article
This paper contributes to the evolving definition of environmental justice by applying insights from the interdisciplinary social science literature in political ecology. While early scholarly environmental justice examinations focused on distributive outcomes of risk, more recent studies have expanded the field to include the analysis of the envir...
Article
There is growing recognition among political ecologists of the need to examine shifting natural resource regimes and their effects on livelihoods in “First World” places. This emerging literature has variously examined the “Third World within,” the persistence of “subsistence activities” in the “First World,” and the “reterritorialization” of land...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Ecologists have studied the mechanisms, communities, distribution, and characteristics of non-native invasive plants. These studies have taken place in both natural and urban environments along a variety of gradients with the underlying theme that urban/suburban land uses are highly disturbed and therefore have higher r...
Article
Full-text available
The cultural and political implications of landscape change and urban growth in the western U.S. are well-documented. However, comparatively little scholarship has examined the effects of urbanization on sense of place in the southern U.S. We contribute to the literature on competing place meanings with a case study from the rural "Sewee to Santee"...
Article
Full-text available
Despite growing interest in urbanization and its social and ecological impacts on formerly rural areas, empirical research remains limited. Extant studies largely focus either on issues of social exclusion and enclosure or ecological change. This article uses the case of sweetgrass basketmaking in Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina, to explore the implic...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we examine the role of claims of global conspiracy in undermining a local environmental planning process known as Natural Heritage 2020 (NH 2020) in Nevada County, California. County officials intended NH 2020 to mitigate the environmental impacts of rapid growth in this gentrifying rural community. This program illustrates the increa...
Article
Typescript. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Oregon, 2004. Includes vita and abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 171-189).

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
This project examines the ways in which urban forests function as sites of natural resource production for residents of cities and suburbs. By drawing on the ecosystem services framework, this research examines both the harvest of plants, lichens, mosses, and fungi by diverse individuals and the urban social-ecologies that support these harvests. In doing so, findings are intended to better understand how dispersed and deconcentrated features of urban ecosystems provide material benefits for social reproduction as well as cultural maintenance. These findings have implications for urban planning, policy, and land management.
Project
This project seeks to explore the ways in which natural resource based livelihoods, particularly those relying on the harvest of nontimber forest products, are impacted by urbanization. In studying urban expansion into forested ecosystems used by local peoples for provisioning and cultural ecosystem service benefits, the project asks how urban development changes these forested ecosystems and influences the social dynamics of access to key resource supplies. Findings from research on sweetgrass basketry--an African American artform associated with the South Carolina Lowcountry--demonstrate how forest ecosystems, ownership dynamics, and the terms of access to both forest fragments and newly planted populations of culturally significant species are reconfigured. The result is lost access by some peoples in particular areas, both because of destruction to forested areas and because new owners block access, while in other areas new populations of plants are made accessible to harvesters by new housing developments and through longstanding and emergent social networks. These findings hold critical insights for understanding the complex changes in social-ecological systems (particularly changing property regimes) that underpin the provisioning and cultural ecosystem services that support nontimber forest product usage.