Patrick Bonin

Patrick Bonin
University Bourgogne Franche-Comté

Full Professor

About

171
Publications
35,388
Reads
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4,061
Citations
Introduction
Adaptive memory is the view championed by James Nairne at Purdue University according to which the functional characteristics of memory have been sculpted by evolutionary pressures faced by our ancestors in the distant past. I am now working in this area of research focusing on animacy effects, on contamination effects in memory, or survival processing effects in memory. Before I used to work in psycholinguistics on topics such as picture naming, or spelling, norms for words.
Additional affiliations
September 2012 - August 2016
French National Centre for Scientific Research
Position
  • Elected Member of the National Committee (section 26) of the CNRS
September 2009 - present
Institut Universitaire de France & University of Bourgogne
Position
  • Professor (Full)
September 2009 - December 2014
University of Burgundy
Position
  • Professor (Full)

Publications

Publications (171)
Article
Full-text available
The Behavioral Immune System (BIS, Schaller & Park, 2011) is a defense system whose function is to protect against pathogen exposure. Memory is an important component of this system (Fernandes et al., 2017). We investigated "contamination effects" in memory in relation to COVID-19. Photographs of everyday objects were shown to adults (N = 80) in th...
Article
Full-text available
Animacy effects in memory correspond to the observation that animates (e.g., cow) are remembered better than inanimates (e.g., pencil). Although the ultimate explanation of these effects seems to be well-documented, clear evidence that would support one or other of the proximate explanations of animacy effects has proven difficult to obtain. Here,...
Article
Full-text available
The threat of diseases varies considerably among individuals, and it has been found to be linked to various proactive or reactive behaviors. In the present studies, we investigated the impact of individual differences in the perceived vulnerability to disease (PVD) on social touch before (Study 1) or during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) p...
Article
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Disgust is a basic emotion which protects individuals from potential contamination. It is hypothesized that disgust evolved primarily as a mechanism against oral contamination or as a strategy against disease infections in general. We investigated visual attention to disgusting oral (rotten food) and non-oral (e.g., a tick) and control (e.g., a gul...
Article
Compounds are morphologically complex words made of different linguistic parts. They are very prevalent in a number of languages such as French. Different psycholinguistic characteristics of compounds have been used in certain studies to investigate the mechanisms involved in compound processing (see Table 7). We provide psycholinguistic norms for...
Chapter
Full-text available
The aim of the present chapter is to present theoretical and empirical arguments in support of the existence of a defense system against pathogens: the Behavioral Immune System (BIS). Complementary to the well-known biological immune system, this system represents a recent theoretical proposition which has given rise to an increasing number of stud...
Article
We provide norms collected on a sample of French adults for a subset of 209 food images selected from the food-pics image database (Blechert, Meule, Busch, & Ohla, 2014). The pictures were rated on arousal, familiarity, valence, liking, frequency of consumption, caloric content, healthiness, tastiness, desire to eat and perceived level of transform...
Article
Full-text available
The survival processing advantage in memory is the finding that items encoded in survival scenarios are remembered better than words encoded in survival-irrelevant scenarios or in deep encoding situations (e.g., pleasantness). Whether this mnemonic advantage, which is generally found in scenarios involving personal survival, can also be observed in...
Article
Full-text available
We provide normative data for a new set of 313 colourised line drawings. The drawings were standardised on name agreement (N = 60 participants), image agreement (N = 34), conceptual familiarity (N = 36), age of acquisition (N = 35), and imageability (N = 35). Objective visual complexity measures are given for the pictures, and objective word freque...
Article
Full-text available
Imagining fictional creatures like zombies in survival situations boosts long-term memory for words encoded in these situations more than rating words for pleasantness (zombie effect). Study 1 required word-ratings in a zombie-survival scenario; participants were told they had to protect against either possible zombie attack or contamination. The z...
Article
Full-text available
Five studies were designed to provide further evidence of contamination effects in memory. In study 1, participants were told to imagine that either (1) they had been infected in the grasslands of a foreign land (ancestral contamination); (2) they had been infected during a trip in a foreign country (modern contamination); or (3) as tour guide, the...
Article
Why are we still afraid of snakes? Contributions of evolutionary psychology to the understanding of certain behavioral biases The purpose of this article is to briefly present the contribution of evolutionary psychology to the understanding of certain behavioral biases. This theoretical orientation, which is not well-known in France, explains behav...
Article
Animacy is one of the basic semantic features of word meaning and influences perceptual and episodic memory processes. However, evidence that this variable also influences lexicosemantic processing is mixed. As animacy is a semantic variable thought to have evolutionary roots, we first examined its influence in a semantic categorization task that d...
Article
Full-text available
The present study was aimed at investigating whether and how image characteristics influence written naming performance in adults. In three different sessions, participants had to quickly write down the names of pictured objects on a graphic tablet. Across sessions, the picture format was different, but the to-be-named objects were the same: There...
Article
Full-text available
Using the megastudy approach, we report a new database (MEGALEX) of visual and auditory lexical decision times and accuracy rates for tens of thousands of words. We collected visual lexical decision data for 28,466 French words and the same number of pseudowords, and auditory lexical decision data for 17,876 French words and the same number of pseu...
Article
Selecting items for designing psycholinguistic experiments can be a very hard and time-consuming process, because of the large number of variables that need to be controlled for. This is clearly the case for picture-naming experiments because, thanks to the collection of psycholinguistic norms on both pictures and their names, a large number of fac...
Article
Animates are remembered better than inanimates because the former are ultimately more important for fitness than the latter. What, however, are the proximate mechanisms underpinning this effect? We focused on imagery processes as one proximate explanation. We tested whether animacy effects are related to the vividness of mental images (Study 1), or...
Article
In visual perception, evidence has shown that attention is captured earlier and held longer by animate than inanimate stimuli. The former are also remembered better than the latter. Thus, as far as attentional processes are concerned, animate entities have a privileged status over inanimate entities. We tested this hypothesis further using an adapt...
Article
In visual perception, evidence has shown that attention is captured earlier and held longer by animate than inanimate stimuli. The former are also remembered better than the latter. Thus, as far as attentional processes are concerned, animate entities have a privileged status over inanimate entities. We tested this hypothesis further using an adapt...
Article
Words that correspond to a potential sensory experience—concrete words—have long been found to possess a processing advantage over abstract words in various lexical tasks. We collected norms of concreteness for a set of 1,659 French words, together with other psycholinguistic norms that were not available for these words—context availability, emoti...
Book
La psychologie évolutionniste ne cesse de nous rappeler que nous sommes tous descendants de chasseurs-cueilleurs qui ont réussi à résoudre des problèmes adaptatifs, comme trouver de la nourriture, se protéger des prédateurs, rencontrer un partenaire. Si nous pouvons l'ignorer en tant qu'individu, comme le présent ouvrage espère le démontrer à ses l...
Article
We provide psycholinguistic norms for a new set of 160 French idiomatic expressions and 160 proverbs: knowledge, predictability, literality, compositionality, subjective and objective frequency, familiarity, age of acquisition (AoA), and length. Different analyses (reliability, descriptive statistics, correlations) performed on the norms are report...
Article
The adaptive view of human memory (Nairne, 2010) assumes that animates (e.g., rabbit) are remembered better than inanimates (e.g., glass) because animates are ultimately more important for fitness than inanimates. Previous studies provided evidence for this view by showing that animates were recalled or recognized better than inanimates (e.g., Nair...
Article
Background/Study Context: It has been found that young adults remember animates better than inanimates. According to the adaptive view of human memory, this is due to the fact that animates are more important for fitness purposes than inanimates. This effect has been ascribed to episodic memory, where older people exhibit difficulties. Methods: Her...
Article
The present study was aimed at testing the locus of word frequency effects in spelling to dictation: Are they located at the level of spoken word recognition (Chua & Rickard Liow, 2014) or at the level of the orthographic output lexicon (Delattre, Bonin, & Barry, 2006)? Words that varied on objective word frequency and on phonological neighborhood...
Chapter
n the present study, participants had to rate words for their relevance in an ancestral survival scenario (e.g., is bottle relevant in the fictious scenario of being stranded in the grasslands of a foreign land without basic supplies) and for their pleasantness (e.g., is bottle a pleasant word?). A distractor task lasting a few minutes followed and...
Article
The adaptive view of human memory [Nairne, J. S. 2010. Adaptive memory: Evolutionary constraints on remembering. In B. H. Ross (Ed.), The psychology of learning and motivation (Vol. 53 pp. 1-32). Burlington: Academic Press; Nairne, J. S., & Pandeirada, J. N. S. 2010a. Adaptive memory: Ancestral priorities and the mnemonic value of survival processi...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract. Animates are better remembered than inanimates. According to the adaptive view of human memory (Nairne, 2010; Nairne & Pandeirada, 2010a, 2010b), this observation results from the fact that animates are more important for survival than inanimates. This ultimate explanation of animacy effects has to be complemented by proximate explanation...
Article
Seven experiments tested, whether when naming a colored object (e.g., CAR), its color (e.g., red) is phonologically encoded. In the first experiment, adults had to say aloud the names of colored line drawings of objects that were each displayed among 3 black-and-white line drawings (Experiment 1a) or that were presented alone (Experiment 1b). Namin...
Article
Full-text available
According to the age of acquisition (AoA) hypothesis, words acquired early in life are processed faster and more accurately than words acquired later (see Juhasz, 2005; Johnston & Barry, 2006 for reviews). Connectionist models have begun to explore the influence of the age/order of acquisition of the items (and also their frequency of encounter) (E...
Article
Abstract We report an investigation of cross-task comparisons of handwritten latencies in written object naming, spelling to dictation and immediate copying. In three separate sessions, adults had to write down a list of concrete nouns from their corresponding pictures (written naming), from their spoken (spelling to dictation) and from their visua...
Article
Why are certain words remembered better than others? To address this question, researchers studying episodic memory have notably been interested in the encoding conditions that could enhance long-term retention. One encoding condition has recently been the subject of a large number of studies over a relatively short period, namely encoding related...
Article
Full-text available
Pourquoi observe-t-on que certains mots sont mieux retenus que d’autres ? Pour répondre à cette question, les chercheurs qui étudient la mémoire épisodique se sont notamment intéressés aux conditions d’encodage susceptibles d’augmenter la rétention à long terme. Récemment, une condition d’encodage particulière a suscité un nombre élevé de travaux s...
Article
We collected sensory experience ratings (SERs) for 1,659 French words in adults. Sensory experience for words is a recently introduced variable that corresponds to the degree to which words elicit sensory and perceptual experiences (Juhasz & Yap Behavior Research Methods, 45, 160-168, 2013; Juhasz, Yap, Dicke, Taylor, & Gullick Quarterly Journal of...
Article
We collected subjective frequency, age-of-acquisition, and imageability norms for 319 acronyms from French adults. Objective printed frequency, bigram frequency, and lengths in letters, phonemes, and syllables, as well as orthographic neighbors, were computed. The time taken to read acronyms aloud was also recorded. Correlational analyses indicated...
Article
Four studies tested whether the thought of death contributes to the survival processing advantage found in memory tests (i.e., the survival effect). In the first study, we replicated the "Dying To Remember" (DTR) effect identified by Burns and colleagues whereby activation of death thoughts led to better retention than an aversive control situation...
Article
In three experiments, we showed that animate entities are remembered better than inanimate entities. Experiment 1 revealed better recall for words denoting animate than inanimate items. Experiment 2 replicated this finding with the use of pictures. In Experiment 3, we found better recognition for animate than for inanimate words. Importantly, we al...
Article
This study investigated whether in speech production object properties flow in a cascaded manner or whether cascaded processing is restricted to the object's identity. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants saw pictured objects and had to state either their size (GRAND or PETIT-meaning big and small) or their name. The size of the objects varied as a...
Article
Full-text available
The stability-plasticity dilemma is a well-know constraint for artificial and biological neural systems. The basic idea is that learning in a parallel and distributed system requires plasticity for the integration of new knowledge, but also stability in order to prevent the forgetting of previous knowledge. Too much plasticity will result in previo...
Article
Full-text available
We report an investigation of individual differences in handwriting latencies and number of errors in a spelling-to-dictation task. Eighty adult participants wrote a list of 164 spoken words (presented in two sessions). The participants were also evaluated on a vocabulary test (Deltour, 1993). Various multiple regression analyses were performed (on...
Article
The impact of a minimal social comparison feedback in writing was investigated in two experiments. During the first part of each experiment, the participants wrote down the names of pictures as quickly as possible. Before the second part, half of them were given either positive (Experiment 1) or negative (Experiment 2) feedback on their naming spee...
Article
Full-text available
Mareschal, French, and Quinn (2000) and Mareschal, Quinn, and French (2002) have proposed a connectionist model of visual categorization in 3- to 4-month-old infants that simulates and predicts previously unexplained behavioural effects such as the asymmetric categorization effect (French, Mareschal, Mermillod, & Quinn, 2004). In the current paper,...
Article
The impact of a minimal social comparison feedback in writing was investigated in two experiments. During the first part of each experiment, the participants wrote down the names of pictures as quickly as possible. Before the second part, half of them were given either positive (Experiment 1) or negative (Experiment 2) feedback on their naming spee...
Article
We report psycholinguistic norms for 305 French idiomatic expressions (Study 1). For each of the idiomatic expressions, the following variables are reported: knowledge, predictability, literality, compositionality, subjective and objective frequency, familiarity, age of acquisition (AoA), and length. In addition, we have collected comprehension tim...
Article
Full-text available
We report object-naming and object recognition times collected from Russian native speakers for the colorized version of the Snodgrass and Vanderwart (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Learning and Memory 6:174-215, 1980) pictures (Rossion & Pourtois, Perception 33:217-236, 2004). New norms for image variability, body-object interaction [BO...
Article
Full-text available
In a series of six experiments, the influence of frequency trajectory in visual word recognition was investigated. In Experiment 1, frequency trajectory was found to exert a strong and reliable influence on age of acquisition (AoA) ratings. In word reading (Experiment 2), lexical decision (Experiments 3 and 6), proper name decision (Experiment 4),...
Article
According to the age-of-acquisition hypothesis, words acquired early in life are processed faster and more accurately than words acquired later. Connectionist models have begun to explore the influence of the age/order of acquisition of items (and also their frequency of encounter). This study attempts to reconcile two different methodological and...
Article
Full-text available
The issue of how information flows within the lexical system in written naming was investigated in five experiments. In Experiment 1, participants named target pictures that were accompanied by context pictures having phonologically and orthographically related or unrelated names (e.g., a picture of a “ball” superimposed on a picture of a “bed”). I...
Article
We address the issue of how information flows within the written word production system by examining written object-naming latencies. We report 4 experiments in which we manipulate variables assumed to have their primary impact at the level of object recognition (e.g., quality of visual presentation of pictured objects), at the level of semantic pr...
Article
Full-text available
Parler est une de nos activités préférées. Nous produisons en effet environ 16000 mots par jour, ce qui est énorme, et ce, de façon relativement précise puisque nous commettons moins d’un lapsus pour 1000 mots produits. En revanche, la production du langage à l’écrit est une activité moins pratiquée (même si les échanges électroniques – SMS et emai...
Article
Full-text available
We report performance measures for lexical decision (LD), word naming (NMG), and progressive demasking (PDM) for a large sample of monosyllabic monomorphemic French words (N = 1,482). We compare the tasks and also examine the impact of word length, word frequency, initial phoneme, orthographic and phonological distance to neighbors, age-of-acquisit...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of the present study was to provide Russian normative data for the Snodgrass and Vanderwart (Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers, 28, 516-536, 1980) colorized pictures (Rossion & Pourtois, Perception, 33, 217-236, 2004). The pictures were standardized on name agreement, image agreement, conceptual familiarity, imageability,...
Article
Full-text available
Cet article présente des normes d’imageabilité (ou valeurs d’imagerie) pour un ensemble de 1493 mots. Des analyses statistiques réalisées sur ces normes révèlent une fidélité élevée. Les scores d’imageabilité se révèlent par ailleurs assez modestement corrélés avec d’autres variables psycholinguistiques (par ex., fréquences lexicales, âge d’acquisi...
Article
In the current paper, imageability norms are described for a set of 1,493 French words. The statistical analyses conducted on imageability norms have revealed a high reliability between the scores. Moreover, imageability scores are moderately correlated with other psycholinguistic variables (e.g. lexical frequencies, age of acquisition). Analyses c...
Article
Full-text available
Cet article propose une synthèse des principaux travaux sur la question de la transmission de l'activation en production verbale à l'oral. Après avoir rappelé brièvement quels sont les différents niveaux des traitement identifiés par les chercheurs, nous décrivons trois types d'architectures fonctionnelles – discrète-sérielle, en cascade et interac...
Article
In this article, we review the most important studies addressing the issue of the flow of information in speech production. After briefly describing the levels of processing which have been proposed to be involved in speech production, we present three types of cognitive functional architectures that have been put forward in order to account for th...