Patricia Vadasy

Patricia Vadasy
Oregon Research Institute | ORI

Ph.D.

About

61
Publications
16,564
Reads
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2,092
Citations
Introduction
Patricia Vadasy is a Senior Research Scientist at Oregon Research Institute. Patricia's research interests include early reading interventions, and interventions for English language learners.
Additional affiliations
November 2016 - February 2021
Influents Innovations
Position
  • Senior Researcher
Description
  • Co-Principal Investigator, NIH Small Business Innovation and Research projects funded by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities.
August 2005 - present
Oregon Research Institute
Position
  • Senior Research Scientist
September 1989 - July 2014
Washington Research Institute
Position
  • Researcher
Education
September 1997 - June 2000
University of Washington Seattle
Field of study
  • Education

Publications

Publications (61)
Article
Full-text available
A brief experiment was designed to examine cognitive flexibility practice embedded in beginning phonics instruction for kindergarteners with limited early literacy learning. Previously tested phonics content included single- and high-frequency two-letter grapheme-phoneme correspondences (GPCs), introduced at a rate of 2–4 correspondences per week....
Article
Full-text available
Two experiments explored rates for introducing grapheme-phoneme correspondences (GPCs) and the types of correspondences taught for optimal alphabet and early literacy skills learning. In both studies, children entered with minimal alphabet knowledge and were randomly assigned within classrooms to one of two treatments delivered individually over 5...
Article
The authors investigated the influence of teaching letter names and sounds in isolation or in the context of storybook reading on preschool children's early literacy learning and engagement during instruction. Alphabet instruction incorporated paired‐associate learning of correspondences between letter names and sounds. In decontextualized treatmen...
Article
In the study, the authors addressed two areas of inquiry: the influence of enlisting three underlying cognitive learning processes in alphabet learning, and order effects for letter name and letter sound instruction. Alphabet instruction was designed to enlist paired‐associate learning (PAL) only, PAL plus orthographic learning, or PAL plus articul...
Article
This study investigated: 1) the influence of alphabet instructional content (letter names, letter sounds, or both) on alphabet learning and engagement of English only and dual language learner (DLL) children, and 2) the relation between children's initial status and growth in three underlying cognitive learning processes (paired-associate, articula...
Article
Full-text available
This empirical study explored the home environment literacy practices of young Latino English learners and their families. The participants were 217 incoming Kindergarten Latino EL students and parents. The data collection included a completed HLEQ by the parents. In addition, children were administered the PPVT, the preLAS, the PALS-K screening, t...
Article
This study examined benefits of connecting meaning, speech, and print in vocabulary learning for kindergarten English learners. Students screened eligible with limited English proficiency were randomly assigned to two instruction conditions. Both groups received direct instruction in high frequency root words. One condition featured added attention...
Article
A two-cohort cluster randomized trial was conducted to estimate effects of small-group supplemental vocabulary instruction for at-risk kindergarten English learners (ELs). Connections students received explicit instruction in high-frequency decodable root words, and interactive book reading (IBR) students were taught the same words in a storybook r...
Article
A multi-cohort cluster randomized trial was conducted to estimate effects of rich vocabulary classroom instruction on vocabulary and reading comprehension. A total of 1,232 fourth- and fifth-grade students from 61 classrooms in 24 schools completed the study. Students received instruction in 140 Tier Two vocabulary words featured in two grade-level...
Article
In this exploratory study we examine the value of exposure to the spelling and pronunciation of word forms when introducing the meanings of new and difficult vocabulary words. Kindergarten English learners were randomly assigned to one of two types of storybook reading delivered by tutors. Students in both treatments listened to short stories conta...
Article
This study examines the longer term effectiveness of a standard protocol, Tier 2 supplemental vocabulary intervention for kindergarten English learners, designed to develop root word vocabulary knowledge and reinforce beginning word reading skills. Participating students in the original study (n = 93 treatment, 92 control) received 20 weeks of smal...
Article
The current study follows a sample of lower skilled language minority (LM) and native English-speaking (non-LM) students who participated in an efficacy trial of a kindergarten phonics-based intervention. Follow-up procedures allowed 93% of the original sample to be retained for simple treatment effects modeling (N = 78 LM and N = 59 non-LM) and 72...
Article
For 2 years we followed lower-performing English learner (EL) and native English speaking (non-EL) students who participated in an efficacy trial of a supplemental first-grade code-oriented intervention implemented by paraeducators. At the end of grade three, across all students (n = 180 of the original 187 students), treatment effects were maintai...
Article
We examined the efficacy of 20 weeks of individual supplemental phonics-based instruction for language minority (LM) and non-LM first graders. Students were designated LM if the primary home language was not English (otherwise non-LM). Those performing in the bottom half of their classroom LM/non-LM group in letter knowledge and phonological awaren...
Article
Full-text available
This article discusses the kinds of instructional activities that young children need to develop basic language and literacy skills based on recent research and program evaluations. This includes approaches to develop alphabetic understanding, phonological awareness, vocabulary, and oral language. Activities and materials from the Pre-kindergarten...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a Tier 2 standard protocol supplemental intervention designed simultaneously to develop root word vocabulary and reinforce decoding skills being taught to all students in the core beginning reading program with kindergarten Spanish-speaking English learners (ELs). Participating students were dra...
Article
This article reports the outcomes of an experimental evaluation of ReadWell Kindergarten (RWK), a program that focuses on the development of vocabulary, phonological awareness, alphabetic understanding, and decoding. Kindergarten teachers in 24 elementary schools in New Mexico and Oregon were randomly assigned, by school, to teach RWK or their own...
Article
Full-text available
This study tested the efficacy of supplemental phonics instruction for 84 low-skilled language minority (LM) kindergarteners and 64 non-LM kindergarteners at 10 urban public schools. Paraeducators were trained to provide the 18-week (January–May) intervention. Students performing in the bottom half of their classroom language group (LM and non-LM)...
Article
This study replicates research on the efficacy of a repeated reading intervention with word-level instruction for students in Grades 2 and 3 with low to moderate fluency skills, examines differences between treatment implementers, and tests unique contributions of treatment-related variables on outcomes. Students from 13 schools were randomly assig...
Article
The purposes of this study were to replicate previous research on phonics-based tutoring in kindergarten and to compare treatment effects for students who received individual instruction compared to instruction in dyads. Thirty classroom teachers from 13 urban elementary schools referred at-risk students for participation. Students who met screenin...
Article
Many students have difficulty achieving reading fluency, and nearly half of fourth graders are not fluent readers in grade-level texts. Intensive and focused reading practice is recommended to help close the gap between students with poor fluency and their average reading peers. In this study, the Quick Reads fluency program was used as a supplemen...
Article
This study examined effects of a repeated reading intervention, Quick Reads, with incidental word-level scaffolding instruction. Second- and third-grade students with passage-reading fluency performance between the 10th and 60th percentiles were randomly assigned to dyads, which were in turn randomly assigned to treatment (paired tutoring, n = 82)...
Article
This study examined the long-term growth of reading skills following 1 year of supplemental 1st-grade code-oriented intervention provided by paraeducators. A group of 79 1st graders with reading skills averaging in the lowest quartile received explicit alphabetic and decoding instruction and were assessed postintervention and at 1-year intervals th...
Article
A total of 46 children in Grades 2 and 3 with low word-level skills were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups that received supplemental phonics-based reading instruction. One group received intervention October through March (21.5 hours), and one group served as a control from October through March and later received intervention March through May (...
Article
The sous-chef and the executive chef work closely together to prepare gour- met cuisine. Although an untrained observer might have difficulty determin- ing where one chef's role ends and the other's begins, their respective roles in the kitchen are differentiated very clear- ly. Ultimately, the executive chef ensures that all of the dishes comple-...
Article
Full-text available
A primary responsibility of general and special educators is to teach students how to read. In inclusive classrooms, paraprofessionals are utilized frequently to support literacy instruction. Paraprofessionals can be employed to help improve reading skills of students with disabilities or those considered at-risk. In this article we outline commona...
Article
Two studies—one quasi-experimental and one randomized experiment—were designed to evaluate the effectiveness of supplemental instruction in structural analysis and oral reading practice for second- and third-grade students with below-average word reading skills. Individual instruction was provided by trained paraeducators in single- and multiletter...
Article
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of code-oriented supplemental instruction for kindergarten students at risk for reading difficulties. Paraeducators were trained to provide 18 weeks of explicit instruction in phonemic skills and the alphabetic code. Students identified by their teachers meeting study eligibility criteria...
Article
Full-text available
In this quasi-experimental study, which is part of a series of investigations on supplemental reading tutoring variations, the relative effectiveness of more intense decoding instruction or text reading practice was examined. Fifty-seven first-grade students scoring in the lowest quartile for reading skills received either classroom reading instruc...
Article
At-risk 1st graders were randomly assigned to tutoring in more or less decodable texts, and instruction in the same phonics program. The more decodable group (n = 39) read storybooks that were consistent with the phonics program. The less decodable group (n = 40) read storybooks written without phonetic control. During the first 30 lessons, storybo...
Article
This study reports new analyses from an earlier study by Antil, Jenkins, Wayne, & Vadasy (1998) in which 21 general education classroom teachers were interviewed about their use of cooperative learning. We report teachers' perceptions of how cooperative learning benefits special education and remedial students, the percentage of these students who...
Article
In this article we report data from a longitudinal study of one–to–one tutoring for students at risk for reading disabilities. Participants were at–risk students who received phonics–based tutoring in first grade, students who were tutored in comprehension skills in second grade, and students tutored in both grades 1 and 2. At second–grade posttest...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the effectiveness of nonprofessional tutors in a phonologically based reading treatment similar to those in which successful reading outcomes have been demonstrated. Participants were 23 first graders at risk for learning disability who received intensive one-to-one tutoring from noncertified tutors for 30 minutes, 4 days a week...
Article
This article describes a tutoring program for struggling 1st-grade readers. The program, Sound Partners, was designed for nonteacher tutors to supplement classroom reading instruction. It emphasizes basic phonological awareness and phonological reading skills in an attempt to build a decoding foundation for more advanced reading development. Togeth...
Article
This study examined the prevalence, conceptualization, and form of cooperative learning used by elementary school teachers. Responding to a survey, 93% of teachers (n = 85) from six elementary schools in two districts indicated they used cooperative learning. In interviews with a subset of those teachers (n = 21), all indicated having daily coopera...
Article
This study examined the prevalence, conceptualization, and form of cooperative learning used by elementary school teachers. Responding to a survey, 93% of teachers (n = 85) from six elementary schools in two districts indicated they used cooperative learning. In interviews with a subset of those teachers (n = 21), all indicated having daily coopera...
Article
Summarizes the implementation of the phonological skills intervention in kindergarten (reported in R. O'Connor et al, 1996) and discusses the long-term (end of 1st grade) effects of that intervention. The Ss were 80 of the 90 children from the original treatment and control classes and 16 of the 17 children in the self-contained special education k...
Article
This study examined teachers' receptivity to, and the factors that influence their use of, a practice new to classroom teachers for including students with learning disabilities, classwide peer tutoring (CWPT; Fuchs, Mathes, & Fuchs, 1993). CWPT is a whole-class approach that uses teacher-orchestrated procedures and peer-mediated practice to supple...
Article
One-to-one instruction, while highly desirable for children with the lowest reading skills, is not often available. It could be provided by nonprofessional tutors in the community, however. One aim of this study was to determine whether a one-to-one phonologically based tutoring program that incorporates many features of successful early reading pr...
Article
Describes an intervention for which a set of lessons was designed to provide individual instruction in phonological and early reading skills to 1st-grade students. Community tutors delivered lessons after school to 17 students identified as at high risk for a reading disability. Their performances were compared to the performances of students in a...
Article
This study was designed to test the effects of activity-based phonological instruction delivered by five classroom teachers on the phonological skill development and reading and writing outcomes of kindergarten children with (n = 31) and without (n = 57) disabilities, and children repeating kindergarten (n = 19) placed in general and self-contained...
Article
This article reviews the issues related to child abuse and neglect of most concern to early childhood professionals: incidence and prevalence; factors associated with maltreatment, including child and parent characteristics; mediating factors, including social support; cognitive, emotional, and social sequelae; and policy directions and recommendat...
Article
This study examined the relationship between parent and child characteristics and competencies, supports available to the family, and how these factors influence parent and child outcomes. The sample of 48 mother-father pairs of young children with handicaps was assessed on a group of questionnaires, an interview at pretest, and 2 years later. Pare...
Article
Professionals who deliver early childhood special education services in rural areas commonly encounter problems and challenges. They must often serve children of diverse ages and with a wide range of handicapping conditions who are scattered over large geographical areas. To compound the problems of serving these children, support services in rural...
Article
As the goals of early intervention have broadened, it is appropriate that measures used to document efficacy be re-evaluated. This article reviews briefly trends in the use of outcome measures, beginning with IQ and other developmental tests that focus on the child. Two recent reports are reviewed which illustrate the problems of relying solely upo...
Article
Summarizes the recent research on language development in young children with Down's syndrome (DS). Researchers agree that the language of these children develops in the same sequence as does the language of nonretarded children; however, children with DS experience delays in the acquisition of language. Such delays may be caused by auditory defici...
Article
A follow-up study was conducted to determine the longitudinal effects of an innovative program for fathers of handicapped children. Both fathers who participated in the program and their wives completed six measures of stress, depression, social support, family environment, grief, and information needs. Pre-post data were analyzed, and time effects...
Article
The Computer-Assisted Program (CAP) Project addresses the needs of educationally underserved families who live in rural or remote areas or who otherwise lack regular access to early intervention programs. The following article describes the components of this model and the use of computer technology to generate individualized child programs and to...
Article
Families with young handicapped children have special needs for instrumental and emotional support. Many of these can be met within the family system. The role of grandparents is often overlooked, yet not only are they affected by a grandchild's handicap, but they often have resources that can strengthen the family. This article reviews findings on...
Article
This article summarizes the recent research literature on affective and cognitive development in young children with Down syndrome. Researchers agree that affect and cognition seem to be as closely Interrelated in children with Down syndrome as they are in nonretarded children. In addition, the overall findings indicate that, during the first two y...
Article
The rationale for and history of an innovative program designed to meet the special needs of fathers of young handicapped children are described. The Supporting Extended Family Members (SEFAM) Father's Program provided fathers with both a regular source of information about their child and access to professional and peer support. The program was ev...
Article
Recipients of training in a model vocational program for deaf-blind youth participated in a summer workshop placement. Three deaf-blind teenage students were placed for four to eight weeks in a community-subsidized work program modeled on the Specialized Training Program. All students generalized assembly and self-help skills in which they had been...
Article
Who are the families who choose to participate in an early intervention program tailored to meet the needs of traditionally underserved members of the young handicapped child's family? In an HCEEP project for fathers and their infants and toddlers, both parents completed a set of measures that provided demographic information, as well as data in th...
Article
Research on the impact of the handicapped child on siblings has indicated several sibling characteristics that are associated with increased sibling vulnerability to stress and other problems. The identification of sibling risk factors, in and of itself, however, does not help us understand differences in sibling outcomes. A transactional framework...
Article
While most early intervention programs for handicapped children that involve parents focus on the needs of the handicapped child's mother, the research indicates that fathers play an important role in their child's development and often need help learning how to adapt to the birth of a handicapped child and to foster the child's development. Our in...

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Projects (5)
Project
What is the purpose of study? To examine explicit training in orthographic knowledge and cognitive flexibility skill for K-1 children at risk for early word reading difficulties. Theory and research suggest benefits associated with explicitly teaching at-risk children who are beginning to learn to read in English multiple phonics letter pattern sizes (both single and 2-letter patterns), and cognitive flexibility support and strategies to help children to apply subword orthographic knowledge in their early word reading and spelling. More recent research suggests that this orthographic knowledge and skill in flexibly processing varied orthographic patterns that characterize written English, support the important beginning reading skill of word reading fluency.