Patricia Pendry

Patricia Pendry
Washington State University | WSU · Department of Human Development

About

35
Publications
9,401
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983
Citations
Citations since 2016
24 Research Items
702 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Full-text available
As most university-based animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) feature interactions with dogs, little is known about the feasibility of providing opportunities to interact with cats. Few studies have examined employee or student interest in interacting with on-campus cats, and virtually nothing is known about the role of participants’ characteristic...
Preprint
Full-text available
Stress detection and classification from wearable sensor data is an emerging area of research with significant implications for individuals' physical and mental health. In this work, we introduce a new dataset, ADARP, which contains physiological data and self-report outcomes collected in real-world ambulatory settings involving individuals diagnos...
Article
While efficacy trials suggest that Animal Visitation Programs (AVPs) relieve university student stress, their essential components are unknown. Students were randomly assigned to one of four 10-min conditions: AVP touch (n = 73), AVP proximity (n = 62), AVP imagery (n = 57), or AVP waitlist (n = 57). Participants collected salivary cortisol (Cort)...
Presentation
Full-text available
The inclusion of cats in animal-assisted interventions (AAIs; i.e. structured interventions that include animals in human services for the purpose of human therapeutic gains; IAHAIO, 2018) is increasing. This is surprising given that feline needs (e.g., stable territory) appear contradictory to AAIs (e.g., repeated territory relocation). This study...
Presentation
Full-text available
We assessed attitudes of higher-education staff and students' (i.e., openness, perceived risks, expected impacts) towards on-campus animal visits. Assessing these attitudes is important as attitudes predict human behaviour directed towards the animals involved (Kraus, 1995), which likely impacts their welfare (Lund et al, 2006). Cross-sectional, qu...
Article
Despite evidence that youth develop close relationships with their childhood pets, virtually nothing is known about how pet attachment and behavioral involvement with pets may shape students’ pet-separation anxiety during the transition to college. Given that separation may constitute a potential risk factor for developing mental health issues, we...
Poster
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Smartcollars function as non-invasive tools to measure animals’ physiological responses and physical activity in naturalistic settings. The current study describes PetPace smartcollar data collected in a college campus cat with owner-provided survey data to compare data collected in the context of campus visits of the cat with the cat’s behavior at...
Presentation
Delanoeije, J., Pendry, P., Peeters, E. & Moons, C. (2021, June 22-24). College campus cat: Exploring PetPace collar data and survey data to measure physiological responses and physical activity during campus visits. [Unpublished conference abstract]. 30th International Society for Anthrozoology Conference [Virtual], Buffalo, NY, U.S.
Article
Full-text available
Implementation of university-based animal-assisted stress-prevention programs is increasing despite limited knowledge about impacts on students’ academic success. This randomized trial (N = 309) examined the effects of a 4-week stress-prevention program with varying levels of human–animal interaction (HAI) and evidence-based content presentations o...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Past research has highlighted the important role of stress in substance misuse and addiction, particularly for relapse risk. Mobile health (mHealth) interventions that incorporate real-time monitoring of physiological markers of stress offer particular promise for delivering tailored interventions to individuals during high-risk states o...
Article
Background: Previous research has highlighted the role of stress in substance misuse and addiction, particularly for relapse risk. Mobile health interventions that incorporate real-time monitoring of physiological markers of stress offer promise for delivering tailored interventions to individuals during high-risk states of heightened stress to pr...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on salivary bioscience applications in Human–Animal Interaction (HAI) research, an expanding field of interdisciplinary inquiry examining the mutual, dynamic relationships between people and animals and the ways in which these interactions may affect health and well-being in both species. Using a social neuroscience perspective...
Article
Full-text available
Animal Visitation Programs (AVPs) targeting college students’ stress and academic success have increased, despite limited research on academic outcomes. This randomized controlled trial (N = 349) examined the effects of incorporating levels of Human–animal Interaction (HAI) (0%, 50% or 100%) with therapy dogs in a four-week academic stress manageme...
Article
The use of university-based Animal Visitation Programs (AVPs)—programs aimed at reducing student stress through human–animal interaction (HAI)—has increased. Implementation has expanded despite our limited understanding about program effects on student and animal wellbeing. Moreover, little is known about the nature of interactions between students...
Article
Full-text available
An increase in the prevalence of stress among college students is compromising their mental health and academic success. One approach to stress prevention that has seen a surge in implementation is the use of university-based Animal Visitation Programs (AVPs). Despite their popularity and promising causal findings, program evaluations on students’...
Article
Full-text available
There has been an increase in research concerning the quality of dyadic interactions between humans and dogs in university-based animal assisted activities (AAAs). While interactions between students and dogs are commonly an area of focus, studies examining interactions between handlers and their dogs are needed. We coded 10-min long video-recorded...
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine whether clinical levels of depression moderated university students’ momentary emotional states (e.g. feeling content, anxious, irritable and depressed) in response to conditions commonly experienced during universal, college-based Animal Visitation Programs (AVPs). Design/methodology/approach Duri...
Article
Full-text available
University students report high levels of stress. Although causal work is limited, one popular approach to promote stress relief is animal visitation programs (AVPs). We conducted a randomized trial (N = 249) examining effects of a 10-minute AVP on students’ salivary cortisol levels. Undergraduate students were randomly assigned to one of four cond...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined associations between adolescents' (N = 59; Mage = 11.63) diurnal and momentary activity of the Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal (HPA) axis as marked by salivary cortisol, and affective and behavioral responses to their first, mounted equine assisted learning (EAL) activity. The introduction to riding occurred during the fifth week...
Article
Full-text available
In response to the growing prevalence of mental health issues among college students, campuses across the nation are implementing animal-assisted stress reduction programs, despite a clear lack of evidence supporting their efficacy. Researchers conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine the effects of a universal, campus-based, animal-ass...
Article
Full-text available
There is growing evidence that promoting social competence in youth is an effective strategy to prevent mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders in adulthood. Research suggests that programs delivered in collaboration with schools are particularly effective when they target social and emotional skill building, utilize an interactive instructiona...
Article
Full-text available
Although equine facilitated programs have gained in popularity over the last decade, virtually nothing is known about the causal effects of equine facilitated interventions on human development and well-being. Researchers conducted a randomized trial to determine the effects of an 11-week equine facilitated learning program on the activity of the H...
Article
Based on a sample of parents (N = 148) of 4- to 7-year-olds (N = 74, M = 5.76 years), this study adapted a widely used, self-report measure of couples' dyadic conflict behavior to include reports of couples' conflict behavior in the child's presence (triadic conflict) to examine their additive and interactive associations with child maladjustment....
Article
In this study, associations were examined between cortisol levels of wives and husbands in 47 heterosexual married couples. Both partners' salivary cortisol levels were measured at the same moments seven times a day on 2 typical weekdays. After accounting for the effects of the diurnal rhythm of cortisol and relevant control variables, dyadic hiera...
Article
To explore the efficacy of equine programming to support positive behavioral development of horse-novice youth, researchers examined trajectories of behavioral change of 5-8th grade students as they participate in an equine facilitated learning program. Behaviors were rated and analyzed to examine group trajectories of change. Results indicated sig...
Article
While associations between exposure to marital conflict and child development have been documented extensively in middle childhood and adolescence, few studies have examined the developmental consequences of conflict exposure in infancy. Moreover, those that have examined marital conflict in infancy tended to focus on consequences of conflict expos...
Article
Self-regulation ability is an important component of children's academic success. Physiological reactivity may relate to brain activity governing attention and behavioral regulation. Saliva samples collected from 186 preschool children (101 boys, mean age = 53 months, 34% minority) before and after a series of mildly challenging games and again 30...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, the authors examined parent-adolescent cortisol associations in 45 families with adolescent children (24 girls; M age = 15.78 years, SD = 1.44 years). Family members' salivary cortisol levels were measured seven times a day on 2 typical weekdays. Family members provided reports of demographic and health variables, and adolescents rat...
Article
Full-text available
Associations between family functioning and children's stress hormone levels are explored, by examining how aspects of the interparental relationship (parents' marital satisfaction and parent conflict styles), the mother—child relationship (maternal involvement and warmth) and maternal emotional functioning (depression, anxiety and self-esteem) rel...
Article
Full-text available
Associations between demographic characteristics, school schedules, activity choices, family functioning, and sleep behaviors were estimated using nationally representative time-diary data from 2,454 children (ages 5.5 to 11.9 years) and adolescents (ages 12.0 to 19.1 years). For weekdays, African American adolescents, Asian children, and those wit...
Article
Although equine facilitated programs have gained in popularity over the last decade, virtually nothing is known about the causal effects of equine facilitated interventions on human development and wellbeing. To address this gap in the literature, researchers conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine if an 11-week equine facilitated lear...

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Projects (2)