Patricia L Mabry

Patricia L Mabry
National Institutes of Health | NIH · Office of Disease Prevention

Ph.D.

About

16
Publications
6,903
Reads
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2,072
Citations
Citations since 2017
0 Research Items
1693 Citations
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Introduction
Dr. Mabry joined the NIH Office of Disease Prevention in March 2014. She leads a team in developing a portfolio analysis tool to characterize NIH's investments in prevention research and another to promote the use of the best methods in prevention research. Dr. Mabry was formerly with the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research. She runs a listserv devoted to systems science, scientific rigor, reproducibility, big data. For current CV or to subscribe contact mabryp@od.nih.gov
Additional affiliations
October 2015 - present
Indiana University
Position
  • Managing Director
March 2014 - present
National Institutes of Health
Position
  • Senior Advisor for Disease Prevention
Description
  • I am developing a portfolio analysis tool to categorize NIH investments in prevention research. I am a NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Executive Committee Member (see http://bd2k.nih.gov). See more at: https://prevention.nih.gov/about/strategic-plan
April 2013 - March 2014
National Institutes of Health
Position
  • Acting Deputy Director

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
INSIGHTS Design principles for synthetic ecology p. 1425 ▶ Whacking hydrogen into metal p. 1429 PE R S PE C T IVE S SCIENTIFIC INTEGRITY Self-correction in science at work By Bruce Alberts, 1 Ralph J. Cicerone, 2 Stephen E. Fienberg, 3 Alexander Kamb, 4 Marcia McNutt, 5 * Robert M. Nerem, 6 Randy Schekman , 7 Richard Shiffrin, 8 Victoria Stodden, 9...
Article
Full-text available
Transparency, openness, and reproducibility are readily recognized as vital features of science (1, 2). When asked, most scientists embrace these features as disciplinary norms and values (3). Therefore, one might expect that these valued features would be routine in daily practice. Yet, a growing body of evidence suggests that this is not the case...
Article
Full-text available
Thermal biofeedback may be a useful adjunctive technique for enhancing cutaneous blood flow in patients with lower-extremity vascular complications of diabetes. However, autonomic, sensory, and/or motor neuropathies may impair vasomotion and limit the ability to alter blood flow and achieve significant foot warming with thermal biofeedback. We exam...
Article
In a study examining the relationships between two social psychological factors and exercise partner preferences, 97 women (mean age 32.42; SD = 9.85 years) provided demographic information, indicated their exercise partner preference, and completed measures of social physique anxiety (SPA) and perceived social discomfort (PSD) in exercise settings...
Article
This paper chronicles the development and feasibility testing of a computerized scheduled gradual reduction program for smokeless tobacco cessation. During Study 1, the LifeSign smoking cessation computer was adapted for use with smokeless tobacco by pairing it with an electronic timer. The computer recorded frequency of dips during a baseline phas...
Article
Thermal biofeedback (TBF) increases blood flow and may promote healing of diabetic ulcers, the leading cause of nontraumatic amputation in the U.S. We examined the relationship between nerve function and hand- and foot-warming proficiency during TBF in diabetic patients. Multiple regression techniques revealed that sympathetic and sensory nerve fun...
Article
The purpose of this article is to review the literature on the effects of the menstrual cycle on dependent variables in mood disorder research to inform investigators which physiological measures are likely to be significantly affected by menstrual cycle fluctuations and precisely how they might be affected. The following variables are discussed: p...
Article
The authors examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and the self-reported use of alcohol, carbohydrates, and caffeine in normal volunteers and four groups of psychiatric outpatients. Outpatients and normal volunteers were given a questionnaire asking about their use of each of the three substances in response to each of the 14 depress...

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