Patricia Louie

Patricia Louie
University of Washington Seattle | UW · Department of Sociology

Ph.D. Sociology

About

13
Publications
1,830
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138
Citations

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
This article investigates the association between skin tone and mental health in a nationally representative sample of black adolescents. The mediating influences of discrimination and mastery in the skin tone–mental health relationship also are considered. Findings indicate that black adolescents with the darkest skin tone have higher levels of de...
Article
The tendency for blacks to report similar or better mental health than whites has served as an enduring paradox in the mental health literature for the past three decades. However, a debate persists about the mechanisms that underlie this paradox. Drawing on the stress process framework, we consider the counterbalancing roles of self-esteem and tra...
Article
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This study assessed whether race moderates the association between flourishing and all-cause mortality. We used panel data from the Midlife in the United States Study (MIDUS) (1995–2016) (n = 2851). Approximately 19% of White respondents and 23% of Black respondents of the baseline sample died over the course of the 21-year study period (n = 564)....
Article
A central paradox in the mental health literature is the tendency for black Americans to report similar or better mental health than white Americans despite experiencing greater stress exposure. However, black Americans’ higher levels of certain coping resources may explain this finding. Using data from the Nashville Stress and Health Study (n = 1,...
Article
Does hearing about or witnessing someone else experience discrimination harm individuals’ mental health? Using data from the Nashville Stress and Health Study, we answer this question by examining how vicarious discrimination impacts depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and anger among black Americans. We also test whether mastery and self-esteem...
Article
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Over the past two decades, researchers have worked to make sense of the fact that Black Americans tend to exhibit similar or better mental health profiles relative to their White counterparts. In this study, we extend previous research by proposing and testing a new potential explanation of the Black-White mental health paradox: the dark side of re...
Article
Full-text available
Background and Objectives: This study assessed how attributions for everyday discrimination typologies relate to all-cause mortality risk among older Black adults. Research Design and Methods: Data come from Black participants in the 2006/2008 Health and Retirement Study (N=1,232). Attributions for everyday discrimination (i.e., ancestry, gender,...
Article
The influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health is of mounting concern to population-health researchers. While early reports indicated increases in mental health problems, noticeably absent from these studies is how mental health has changed in 2020 compared to previous years (2013–2019) and whether such trends vary by race/ethnicity. The p...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The present study assessed whether reporting multiple reasons for perceived everyday discrimination was associated with an increased risk for all-cause mortality risk among older Black adults. Methods: This study utilized data from a subsample of older Black adults from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a nationally representative...
Article
The tendency for Blacks to report similar or lower rates of mental disorder than Whites is well-established. However, whether these disparities are stable across cohorts of Black and White Americans is not well understood. In the current study, we examined Black-White differences in the lifetime prevalence of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Me...
Article
Studies have found blacks in the USA report lower levels of anger-out and higher levels of anger-in than whites. However, most of the research on anger expression has been based on data from limited samples. The current study investigates the black–white difference in anger-in and anger-out in a sample representative of Americans aged 40 and older....
Chapter
Engaging theories of legal consciousness, rights mobilization, and workplace conflict, we detail the factors that lead workers to mobilize their rights under US antidiscrimination laws and the obstacles that they face. Drawing on quantitative data from defendants in discrimination lawsuits as well as qualitative data from interviews with plaintiffs...

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Project (1)
Project
As shown in more than 200 papers, marginalized people gain less health from the very same socioeconomic resources than mainstream populations. In the US, Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, Asian Americans, and LGBTs are at a relative disadvantage compared to mainstream populations regarding the protective effects of education, income, employment, and marital status on a wide range of health outcomes. This phenomenon also holds for marginalized Whites who live in poor conditions. So it is not the behaviors of a particular group that result in disparities. It is social marginalization, broadly defined. Here is a summary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0TQ-FXmADI&t=1723s