Pat Baird

Pat Baird
Simon Fraser University · Centre for Wildlife Ecology

PhD

About

34
Publications
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346
Citations
Introduction
Pat Baird currently works at Kahiltna Research Group - Canada on ecological projects whose focus is marine food webs and the ecology of seabirds, shorebirds, and marine plankton. Her early work was on seabirds as indicators of the health of the ocean. In Canada she is also associated with the Centre for Wildlife Ecology , Simon Fraser University, and in California, with the Department of Biological Sciences at Cal State. Her research has encompassed projects from Argentina to Alaska, and California to France, where she has collaborated with a number of colleagues. Her current project is on the importance of diatoms in the marine ecosystem.

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
This review highlights diatoms and their production of fatty acids at Arctic ice edges and temperate estuaries as strategic in initiating high spring productivity. As important as their energy production is their synthesis de novo of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), which are bioactive molecules fundamental to maintaining e...
Book
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Research over four years on breeding biology, feeding ecology, abundance and distribution of ten species seabirds in seven colonies
Article
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Noninvasive, safe, quick marking of individual animals using distinctive colors that are highly visible and persistent is a valuable methodology, but practical techniques and permanent safe dyes are lacking. Here we describe a novel, remotely controlled dye machine to rapidly mark stationary animals in predictable locations, such as birds sitting o...
Article
Full-text available
3 Supplemental & Supporting sections to Baird et al. 2017 A Remote Marking Device and Newly Developed Permanent Dyes for Wildlife Research 1. Detailed instructions how to build the dye machine 2. Summaries of dyes used in other studies - their longevity, visibility, & toxicity 3. The biochemistry of dyes and why only the dyes we chose to mark with...
Conference Paper
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Plants at the base of the food chain, produce energy through photosynthesis using Chlorophyll-α (alpha) and sunlight. However, diatoms, phytoplankton, not only produce energy (alpha-based) but are also the major source of omega-three long-chain highly unsaturated fatty acids when they bloom. Omega-3's are essential for various physiological process...
Conference Paper
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Seabirds are better samplers of what occurs in the ocean than are any other type of sampling method. Seabirds are top predators, and sample from near the bottom of the food chain to near the top, at various depths, and in a myriad of geographic locations-both nearshore and offshore, over the continental shelf, along the shelf break, or in pelagic r...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Seabirds are better samplers of what occurs in the ocean than are any other type of sampling method. Seabirds are top predators, and sample from near the bottom of the food chain to near the top, at various depths, and in a myriad of geographic locations-both nearshore and offshore, over the continental shelf, along the shelf break, or in pelagic r...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Seabirds in the Arctic - their challenges in a warming world-- Climate change- The talk begins by discussion of changes in the marine environment from 1975-present, I illustrate differences between seabirds and other birds, and present data on how the Arctic is changing and why it is changing so rapidly. I then continue with a story of three arcti...
Article
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Trace element concentrations were measured in Pacific Dunlin (Calidris alpina pacifica) to identify factors that influence accumulation and to assess toxicity risks. We report concentrations of cadmium, copper, and zinc in kidneys as well as copper, lead, mercury, selenium and zinc in feathers. Relationships between element concentrations and Dunli...
Conference Paper
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The military owns <4% of the land in California, yet 53.5% of the population of least terns nest there. Of the colonies with > 100 pairs, the military has 65.3%. Habitat for terns on military land is indeed preferred in part because the military owns large and unfragmented tracts of undisturbed. It is also is protected by fenced areas, and access i...
Conference Paper
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English: Birds carry no passports. They do not stop at Customs. They are international--belonging to the world. These migratory birds are as much a part of South America as they are a part of Panama, Mexico, the United States and Canada. International groups of researchers and managers understand that by working together in partnerships, we can ach...
Article
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The Least Tern (Sternula antillarum) has undergone large population declines over the last century as a result of direct and indirect anthropogenic factors. The genetic implications of these declines are unknown. We used historical museum specimens (pre-1960) and contemporary (2001–2005) samples to examine range-wide phylogeographic patterns and in...
Article
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Por mucho tiempo se ha debatido la identidad taxonómica de las poblaciones en peligro de Sternula antillarum. Su estatus de conservación actual genera un incentivo aún mayor para examinar la distinción taxonómica de estos grupos. Usamos secuencias de ADN mitocondrial de la región control de rápida evolución (840 pares de bases; n = 188) y datos de...
Article
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We used telemetry and visual observations to identify important stopover sites used by western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) migrating from their major overwintering area in Panama Bay, north through Mexico to the United States during spring from 2005 through 2008. This tracking project is part of a research effort to discover possible alternate migr...
Article
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Communication in colonial seabirds is an important part of their existence. They use a combination of calls and postures to find a mate, defend a territory, and communicate to their neighbors, mates, chicks, or parents. Communication means expressing a motivation (e.g. aggression or hunger) via a posture, movement, or vocalization in response to a...
Chapter
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Black-legged Kittiwakes are small, pelagic gulls with a circumpolar distribution in the northern hemisphere. They feed at the ocean surface on fish and macrozooplankton, mostly in daylight, but also at night when foraging over deep ocean waters, where key prey approach the surface in darkness. They breed in colonies numbering from a few to many ten...
Chapter
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This chapter summarizes much of the published and unpublished literature on distribution, abundance, migration, breeding biology, and feeding ecology of marshbirds (herons, rails, cranes, and ibises), waterbirds (ducks, geese, coots, and grebes), shorebirds, and seabirds. each of these species assemblages is discussed separately under each of the f...
Chapter
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Introduction More than 195 species of birds use coastal or offshore aquatic habitats in the Southern California Bight (SCB). Population numbers are not accurately documented, but breeding birds number in the thousands and migratory populations number in the millions. The SCB is the only California breeding location for three seabird species and is...
Article
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Diets of Tufted Puffin (Fratercula cirrhata) chicks and breeding and nonbreeding adults were compared between two years during the breeding season at Kodiak Island, Alaska. Fish dominated the diet of all groups. Nonbreeders ate more invertebrates than did breeders, and chicks were fed the lowest proportion of invertebrates of any group. Nonbreeders...
Article
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Seabirds are suggested as useful indicators of the abundance and distribution of various of their prey species as well as indicators of changes in oceanic conditions. Additionally, it is shown that seabirds with varying foraging methods are affected differently, with respect to breeding success, by changes in prey numbers and availability. Diets of...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies have attempted to correlate abundance and distribution of seabirds over the ocean with various abiotic and biotic factors such as depth, temperature, salinity. This study describes seabird abundance in the Bering Sea at an oil-drilling rig during the stage of "spudding in" (beginning to drill). It suggests that during the drilling proc...
Article
Full-text available
Seabirds are suggested as useful indicators of the abundance and distribution of various of their prey as well as indicators of changes in oceanic conditions. Additionally, it is shown that seabirds with varying foraging methods are affected differently with respect to success, by changes in prey numbers and availability. Diets of three seabird sp...
Article
Full-text available
It is important to know what prey chicks and adults of the same species are eating. Sometimes adults are collected and stomach contents are examined. However, to segregate what adults eat from what they feed to chicks, another method is needed. Although chicks of some species regurgitate their stomach contents readily, chicks of a number of species...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Survey of Unalaska Island to determine populations numbers of seabirds. We estimated numbers of birds at all colonies : double-crested, pelagic, & red-faced cormorants; black oystercatchers; glaucous-winged gulls; black-legged kittiwakes; Aleutian terns; common & thick-billed murres; pigeon guillemots; horned puffins, ancient murrelets; parakeet, C...

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