Paride Antinucci

Paride Antinucci
University College London | UCL · Department of Neuroscience, Physiology, and Pharmacology

PhD
Neuroscientist at UCL

About

11
Publications
2,807
Reads
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296
Citations
Introduction
Systems neuroscientist interested in biological and artificial neural networks for vision, motor control and decision making.
Additional affiliations
April 2013 - present
King's College London
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Neuroscience
Education
September 2011 - September 2012
King's College London
Field of study
  • Neuroscience
September 2007 - April 2011
University of Florence
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
A striking feature of the CNS is the precise wiring of its neuronal connections. During vertebrate visual system development, different subtypes of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) form specific connections with their corresponding synaptic partners. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we report that the c...
Article
Full-text available
The orientation of visual stimuli is a salient feature of visual scenes. In vertebrates, the first neural processing steps generating orientation selectivity take place in the retina. Here, we dissect an orientation-selective circuit in the larval zebrafish retina and describe its underlying synaptic, cellular, and molecular mechanisms. We genetica...
Article
Full-text available
The larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an excellent vertebrate model for in vivo imaging of biological phenomena at subcellular, cellular and systems levels. However, the optical accessibility of highly pigmented tissues, like the eyes, is limited even in this animal model. Typical strategies to improve the transparency of zebrafish larvae require t...
Article
Full-text available
For many species, hunting is an innate behaviour that is crucial for survival, yet the circuits that control predatory action sequences are poorly understood. We used larval zebrafish to identify a population of pretectal neurons that control hunting. By combining calcium imaging with a virtual hunting assay, we identified a discrete pretectal regi...
Article
Full-text available
Hundreds of human genes are associated with neurological diseases, but translation into tractable biological mechanisms is lagging. Larval zebrafish are an attractive model to investigate genetic contributions to neurological diseases. However, current CRISPR-Cas9 methods are difficult to apply to large genetic screens studying behavioural phenotyp...
Preprint
Full-text available
Hundreds of human genes are associated with neurological diseases, but translation into tractable biological mechanisms is lagging. Larval zebrafish are an attractive model to investigate genetic contributions to neurological diseases. However, current CRISPR-Cas9 methods are difficult to apply to large genetic screens studying behavioural phenotyp...
Article
Full-text available
Optogenetic actuators with diverse spectral tuning, ion selectivity and kinetics are constantly being engineered providing powerful tools for controlling neural activity with subcellular resolution and millisecond precision. Achieving reliable and interpretable in vivo optogenetic manipulations requires reproducible actuator expression and calibrat...
Preprint
Full-text available
For many species, hunting is an innate behaviour that is crucial for survival, yet the circuits that control predatory action sequences are poorly understood. We used larval zebrafish to identify a command system that controls hunting. By combining calcium imaging with a virtual hunting assay, we identified a discrete pretectal region that is selec...
Article
Full-text available
The teneurins, also known as Ten-m/Odz, are highly conserved type II transmembrane glycoproteins widely expressed throughout the nervous system. Functioning as dimers, these large cell-surface adhesion proteins play a key role in regulating neurodevelopmental processes such as axon targeting, synaptogenesis and neuronal wiring. Synaptic specificity...
Article
Full-text available
Visual information is already processed in the retina before it is transmitted to higher visual centers in the brain. This includes the extraction of salient features from visual scenes, such as motion directionality or contrast, through neurons belonging to distinct neural circuits. Some retinal neurons are tuned to the orientation of elongated vi...

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