Paraic C. Ryan

Paraic C. Ryan
University College Cork | UCC · Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

PhD, BE (Hons), MSc, PGD, MIEI

About

38
Publications
7,429
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
483
Citations
Citations since 2016
30 Research Items
467 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
Introduction
Dr Paraic C. Ryan is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University College Cork, Ireland. Paraic's research interests include, the impacts of climate change on infrastructure (see CIViC Project), climate change adaptation, material deterioration, reliability and risk modelling and uncertainty modelling.
Additional affiliations
February 2013 - August 2015
The University of Newcastle, Australia
Position
  • Research Academic

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
This study reports the kinetics and isotherms of the adsorption of five herbicides, MCPA, mecoprop-P, 2,4-D, fluroxypyr and triclopyr, from aqueous solutions onto a range of raw and pyrolysed waste materials originating from an industrial setting. The raw waste materials investigated demonstrated little capability for any herbicide adsorption. Gran...
Article
One major issue when considering the effects of climate change is to understand, qualify and quantify how the changing climate will likely impact infrastructure assets and services as it strongly depends on current and future climate variability, location, asset design life, function and condition. Expected changes to local climatic conditions may...
Article
Full-text available
Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) that treat both foul and storm wastewater will experience significant pressure due to changing precipitation patterns and other geophysical parameters. Limited work has been done to understand the links between factors such as tidal and river levels, precipitation, and influent volumes to WWTPs. This paper analys...
Article
While considerable attention has been given to data driven methods that analyse and control energy systems in buildings, the same cannot be said for building water systems. As a result, approaches which support enhanced efficiency in building water consumption are somewhat underdeveloped, particularly in industrial settings. Water consumption in in...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents a novel scoring system which facilitates a relative ranking of pesticide risk to human health arising from contaminated drinking water. This method was developed to identify risky pesticides to better inform monitoring programmes and risk assessments. Potential risk was assessed considering pesticide use, chronic human health ef...
Article
Full-text available
Pesticides are widely employed as a cost‐effective means of reducing the impacts of undesirable plants and animals. The aim of this paper is to develop a risk ranking of transmission of key pesticides through soil to waterways, taking into account physiochemical properties of the pesticides (soil half‐life, and water solubility), soil permeability,...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Part A of the report presents the developed framework for the GIS-based high-level climate change risk assessment. It also presents the implementation of this framework across four of Ireland’s critical infrastructure (CI) sectors. This high-level analysis identified a number of key climate change risks for Ireland’s CI, and examined these using GI...
Conference Paper
p>One major issue when considering the effects of climate change is to understand, qualify and quantify how natural hazards and the changing climate will likely impact infrastructure assets and services as it strongly depends on current and future climate variability, location, asset design life, function and condition. So far, there is no well-def...
Article
The uninterrupted functioning of our energy infrastructure is crucial to the operation of modern day society. Thus, the energy infrastructure we construct today must be capable of supplying reliable power in our future climate. This may require development of effective and financially viable climate change adaptation actions. This is challenging fo...
Article
Full-text available
Large non-residential buildings can contain complex and often inefficient water distribution systems. As requirements for water increase due to water scarcity and industrialization, it has become increasingly important to effectively detect and diagnose faults in water distribution systems in large buildings. In many cases, if water supply is not i...
Article
While fault detection and diagnosis is a popular tool in the process industry, its application in building water distribution systems is however still largely absent. In this study, a new set of Water Distribution System Performance Assessment Rules (WDSPARs) were developed to identify common faults in a building water distribution system. The WDSP...
Conference Paper
The design and operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with combined storm and sewerage networks are significantly impacted by precipitation events characterised by high intensity rainfall and dry days. Normal dry weather flows (DWFs), defined by flows in rain free days with minimum infiltration, are an important parameter in designing was...
Article
Full-text available
Presentation of PestMan project objectives
Article
Full-text available
The IPCC states that climate change has unequivocally impacted on various aspects of the natural and built environment, including our vital critical infrastructure systems (transport, energy, water/wastewater and communications). It is thus essential for countries to gain an understanding of critical infrastructure vulnerability to current and futu...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The latest IPCC report states that warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and this warming may lead to increased risk of breakdown of infrastructure networks due to extreme weather. Before appropriate action can be taken for power infrastructure in this regard, we must first understand existing risk, and then try to predict potential climate...
Chapter
Critical infrastructure is vital to the efficient operation of modern-day societies and economies. Almost all types of critical infrastructure are reliant on energy supply, making energy infrastructure perhaps the most important component of today’s critical infrastructure networks. This chapter explores the vulnerability of power infrastructure to...
Article
The paper describes a risk analysis of the economic impact of damage to metal roofing of a typical contemporary (new) Australian house subject to extreme wind loading. The failure modes considered are roof cladding and batten-to-truss connection failures, with the effect of defective construction also considered. Monte-Carlo simulation and structur...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The warming of the climate system is unequivocal. Changes are already being felt in Ireland and are expected to intensify into the future. It is thus essential to understand the vulnerability of Irish Critical Infrastructure (CI) to climate change, in order to develop appropriate climate adaptation strategies and improve infrastructure resilience d...
Article
Bauxite residue (red mud), the by-product produced in the alumina industry, is being produced at an estimated global rate of approximately 150 Mt per annum. Due to its highly alkaline nature, many refineries use neutralisation techniques such as mud farming (atmospheric carbonation), direct carbon-ation using carbon dioxide or reactions with seawat...
Article
Full-text available
Power distribution pole networks are vulnerable to a changing climate. Climate change can increase wind speeds, and changes in rainfall and temperature can accelerate timber decay, affecting residual capacity of timber power poles. The present paper utilises advanced stochastic simulation methods to examine climate change impacts, and possible clim...
Article
A fragility analysis is conducted for loss of roof cladding for low rise metal-clad industrial buildings located in non-cyclonic regions of Australia. The stochastic analysis includes possible component and connection failures, load redistribution based on progressive failure, spatial distribution of wind load, and internal pressure variation cause...
Article
The IPCC, a collection of 800 of the world’s leading climate change scientists, state that future climate related risks to society and infrastructure are likely to change. It is therefore important for the power industry to consider the possible impacts of future climate change on infrastructure performance. However, very few studies have been publ...
Article
The uptake and accumulation of metals in plants is a potential pathway for the transfer of environmental contaminants in the food chain, and poses potential health and environmental risks. In light of increased population growth and urbanisation, the safe disposal of sewage sludge, which can contain significant levels of toxic contaminants, remains...
Article
Full-text available
The utilisation of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) in Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC) has the potential to reduce both the environmental impact and financial cost associated with this increasingly popular concrete type. However, to date limited research exists exploring the use of coarse RCA in SCC. The work presented in this paper seeks to build...
Article
This paper presents an approach for developing a vulnerability model to predict the probability and extent of damage to metal-clad industrial buildings due to extreme wind loading. Structural reliability-based methods that describe the spatially distributed wind load and component/connection strengths probabilistically are used in the model. Two fa...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents details of the 2007 novel repair of a RC marine bridge that involved removal of concrete cover on each of the bridge's seven crosshead beams and subsequent replacement of the cover with one of five different self-compacting concrete (SCC) options. Details of an on-site research initiative of this kind have not been published in...
Conference Paper
This paper utilises accelerated chloride ingress testing and probabilistic deterioration modeling to examine the durability characteristics of a number of Self Compacting Concrete (SCC) durability options. Firstly the paper presents details of an extensive laboratory study which examines the relative performance of five SCC durability options utili...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
SCORE is a €10m Horizon 2020-funded research project to increase climate resilience in European coastal cities lead by IT Sligo. The overall aim of SCORE is to design, develop, monitor and validate robust adaptation measures in coastal and low-lying areas to protect them from increasing climate and sea level risks, including coastal flooding and erosion, to enhance their overall long-term resilience. SCORE outlines a co-creation strategy, developed via a network of 10 coastal city ‘living labs’ (CCLLs), to rapidly, equitably and sustainably enhance coastal city climate resilience through Ecosystem-Based Approaches (EBAs) and sophisticated digital technologies. SCORE will establish an integrated coastal zone management framework for strengthening EBA and smart coastal city policies, creating European leadership in coastal city climate change adaptation in line with The Paris Agreement. SCORE will involve citizen science in providing prototype coastal city early-warning systems and will enable smart, instant monitoring and control of climate resilience in European coastal cities through open, accessible spatial ‘digital twin’ tools. SCORE will provide innovative platforms to empower stakeholders’ deployment of EBAs to increase climate resilience, business opportunities and financial sustainability of coastal cities. The SCORE interdisciplinary team consists of 28 world-leading organisations from academia, local authorities, RPOs, and SMEs encompassing a wide range of skills including environmental science and policy, climate modelling, citizen and social science, data management, coastal management and engineering, security and technological aspects of smart sensing research.
Project
The overarching aim of this proposal is to use a multidisciplinary approach merging soil processes, molecular biology, engineering, and quantitative risk assessment methodologies to: (1) understand the drivers and pressures for the use of pesticides in the environment, (2) examine their fate and persistence, (3) evaluate any potential impact and risks to the environment and human health, (4) develop a low-cost, passive, in-situ method to remediate pesticides in the environment, and (5) disseminate knowledge and engage stakeholders and the general public in the project.
Project
The project aims to increase our understanding of the vulnerability of Irish critical infrastructure to climate change.