Paola Lombardo

Paola Lombardo
Limno Consulting

PhD

About

43
Publications
21,727
Reads
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800
Citations
Introduction
I am an independent biological limnologist active as a researcher and an environmental consultant. Interests span all inland waters, with an emphasis on basic and applied aspects of the ecology of surface lentic systems (lakes). Focus is on submerged vegetation in shallow-water systems; littoral, stream, and groundwater ecological communities; (lake) gastropods and other benthic macroinvertebrates.
Additional affiliations
June 2014 - June 2015
Università degli Studi dell'Aquila
Position
  • Researcher
March 2012 - present
Università degli Studi dell'Aquila
Position
  • limnologist and environmental analyst
October 2010 - December 2015
Università degli Studi dell'Aquila
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
September 2006 - December 2010
Università degli Studi dell'Aquila
Field of study
  • PhD in Environmental Sciences
August 1995 - December 2001
Kent State University
Field of study
  • PhD in Biological Sciences - Aquatic Ecology
August 1991 - July 1995
Kent State University
Field of study
  • MS in Biological Sciences - Aquatic Ecology

Publications

Publications (43)
Article
Full-text available
Inlay Lake is the second largest natural lake in Myanmar. Located in Shan State, in the eastern part of the country, it is a known biodiversity hotspot. The lake is negatively affected by an increasing local human population and rapid growth in both agriculture and tourism. In recent decades, several studies have listed faunistic and floristic grou...
Article
Full-text available
Research on alien and invasive species focuses on the direct effects of invasion on native ecosystems, and the possible positive effects of their presence are most often overlooked. Our aim was to check the suitability of selected alien species (the snail Physa acuta, the bivalve Dreissena pol-ymorpha, and the gammarid Dikerogammarus villosus) as d...
Article
Physa acuta Draparnaud, 1805 is one of the most common freshwater gastropod species, with worldwide distribution. It is an effective periphyton grazer and a potential keystone species in shallow-water systems, where it can boost macrophyte well-being and thus help maintain high water clarity even in nutrient-rich habitats. P. acuta also has been ex...
Article
Full-text available
The sand stored in the gizzard of some freshwater snails should assist in the mechanical digestion of tough food, yet effects of gizzard sand on consumption of living macrophyte tissue are seldom addressed. We quantified the effects of gizzard sand both on consumption of plant tissue and on snail growth and reproduction with a cross-gradient, 28-da...
Article
Full-text available
Species interactions between stygobites (obligate groundwater organisms) are poorly known, reflecting the difficulty in studying such organisms in their natural environments. Some insight can be gained from the study of the spatial variability in microcrustacean communities in groundwater-fed springs. Earthquakes can increase hydraulic conductivity...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent studies have highlighted the importance of structural and functional parameters to assess the ecological integrity of freshwater ecosystems. Leaf litter breakdown is known as a key ecosystem-level process and has been widely used to evaluate the functional characteristics of aquatic ecosystems. However, leaf detritus decomposition in spring...
Article
Research on behavioural fever in Planorbarius corneus was undertaken using a longitudinal thermal gradient. Before the experiment, snails were acclimated at 19 °C. Following injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a pyrogenic agent), ketoprofen (an antipyretic) or saline solution (control), thermal behaviour of the animals was automatically recorded...
Article
Full-text available
Oviposition by Lymnaea stagnalis (L.) on shells of conspecifics has been reported anecdotally from laboratory observations. In order to gain the first quantitative insight into this behaviour, we have quantified the proportion of individuals bearing egg clutches in a long-term monospecific outdoor laboratory culture of L. stagnalis during two conse...
Article
The ecological knowledge of large rivers is still scarce or highly fragmented mainly because of complex, laborious and expensive procedures to collect informative samples from the benthic biota. Standard sampling protocols for macroinvertebrates were mainly developed and calibrated for wadeable streams while a number of heterogeneous non-standard s...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The role of (semi)aquatic mosses in supporting lacustrine benthic fauna is poorly known. We have compared the macroinvertebrate fauna associated with gravel or with nearby small, isolated shoreline clumps of the moss Fontinalis antipyretica at an otherwise unvegetated, open-canopy, shallow (~0.5 m) site in Lake Piediluco, central Italy, during a gr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Snail herbivory on living macrophytes is uncommon in temperate zones. The sand stored in the gizzard of some snails is thought to assist in the mechanical digestion of tough food, yet effects of gizzard sand on grazing of living macrophyte tissue are seldom addressed. We quantified the effects of gizzard sand both on snail growth and reproduction a...
Article
Full-text available
Earthquakes are among the most destructive natural events. The 6 April 2009, 6.3-Mw earthquake in L'Aquila (Italy) markedly altered the karstic Gran Sasso Aquifer (GSA) hydrogeology and geochemistry. The GSA groundwater invertebrate community is mainly comprised of small-bodied, colourless, blind microcrustaceans. We compared abiotic and biotic dat...
Data
Full-text available
Supplemental Material for Galassi et al., 2014, Earthquakes trigger the loss of groundwater biodiversity; Scientific Reports 4: 6372.
Article
Full-text available
The European Union (EU) threshold values for NH4+ in groundwater range from a minimum of 0.084 m L-1 to the maximum allowed of 5 mg L-1. The aim of our study was to determine whether these values are adequate to protect groundwater copepods in alluvial aquifers underlying intensive agriculture. To this end, we analyzed abiotic (including NH4+ conce...
Article
Full-text available
Information on both structure and function is essential to evaluate the ecological integrity of stream ecosystems and their response to natural and anthropogenic disturbance. Leaf-bags have been widely employed to assess stream ecosystem processes and the degree of leaf mass consumption has been proposed as one of the most useful functional descrip...
Article
Full-text available
Levins's asymmetrical α (alpha) index quantifies between species overlap over resources more realistically than similar-purpose single-value indices. The associated community-wide mean-α index expresses the degree of "species packing". Both indices were formulated upon competing animal (i.e., mobile) organisms and are independent of population dens...
Article
Full-text available
The Water Framework Directive (WFD) of the European Union includes benthic macroinvertebrates for the ecological assessment of running waters. The invertebrate-based Star-ICMi index, adopted in 2010, does not include Hydrachnidia (water mites) in its complex formulation. However, Hydrachnidia are associated with many environmental variables and may...
Article
Full-text available
Key-words: Ceratophyllum demersum, Elodea canadensis, nutrients, allelopathy, alternate stable states in shallow lakes macrophyte–phytoplankton interactions were investigated using a dual laboratory and field approach during a growing season, with responses quantified as changes in biomass. Short-term, close-range interactions in laboratory microco...
Article
Full-text available
Despite half a century of research on planarian-gastropod interactions, the population-level impact of planarian predation on littoral pulmonates is not well known. We have quantified the predation of the common lacustrine planaria Dugesia polychroa Schmidt on the ubiquitous snail Physa acuta Drap., a potential keystone grazer in benthic littoral c...
Article
Full-text available
The impact of Elodea canadensis on aquatic macrophyte biodiversity in (Lake) Steinsfjord has been studied through extensive lake-wide surveys and photographic sampling. E. canadensis greatly expanded in Steinsfjord since its appearance in 1978 and still dominated the macrophyte community in 2004. The areal distribution of E. canadensis peaked withi...
Article
Full-text available
Although most freshwater planarias are well known photonegative organisms, their diel rhythms have never been quantified. Differences in daily activity rhythms may be particularly important for temperate-climate, freshwater planarias, which tend to overlap considerably in spatial distribution and trophic requirements. Activity of stress-free, indiv...
Article
Full-text available
Though triclad planarias could limit littoral snail recruitment by preying on eggs with their muscular ventral pharynx, planarian predation on eggs has never been quantified. Intact egg clutches encompassing eight snail species × three developmental stages were offered to Dugesia (= Schmidtea) polychroa (Paludicola: Dugesiidae) individuals (body le...
Thesis
Doctoral Dissertation in Environmental Sciences; organized in eight chapters; includes bibliography, appendix.
Article
Full-text available
Though much is known about freshwater snail ecology, their circadian rhythms remain poorly investigated. Well-fed, stress-free, mid-size adults of six species common in central Italian lakes were exposed to natural sunlight and photoperiod, and their activity status was recorded at 3-h intervals during a 9-d indoor experiment. All species exhibited...
Article
Full-text available
Allelopathy, here defined as biochemical interactions between aquatic primary producers, has always been intriguing as a process explaining the dominance of certain plant or algal species over others. Negative chemical interference has been invoked as one of the steering mechanisms behind mutual dominance of either submerged macrophytes or phytopla...
Article
Full-text available
Allelopathy, here defined as biochemical interactions between aquatic primary producers , has always been intriguing as a process explaining the dominance of certain plant or algal species over others. Negative chemical interference has been invoked as one of the steering mechanisms behind mutual dominance of either submerged macrophytes or phytopl...
Article
Full-text available
Allelopathy, here defined as biochemical interactions between aquatic primary producers , has always been intriguing as a process explaining the dominance of certain plant or algal species over others. Negative chemical interference has been invoked as one of the steering mechanisms behind mutual dominance of either submerged macrophytes or phytopl...
Article
Full-text available
Seven shallow-to-intermediate-depth, meso-eutrophic lakes in northeast Ohio were surveyed July-August 1998 to evaluate a macrophyte-based littoral food-web (and its possible manipulation) role in increasing or maintaining water transparency. Macrophyte and periphyton growth were determined from pre-weighed C. demersum sprigs and biomass developed o...
Article
Full-text available
Many trophic generalist gastropods exert predation-based control on their trophic resources. However, most grazing experiments have been carried out with single snail species, and little is known about snail effects on trophic resources by coexisting species. Substrate colonization and feeding behavior of Physa spp. (Physidae) and Helisoma trivolvi...
Article
Full-text available
High macrophyte density in shallow lakes is often associated with clear water, especially when the non-rooted, submerged angiosperm Ceratophyllum demersum is dominant. Lack of true roots and high surface area:volume ratio suggest that nutrient uptake from the water column by C. demersum may be high. Therefore, possible competition for nutrients, in...
Article
Full-text available
Snails are considered to be primarily algivores, and may consume macrophytes only upon plant senescence and death. However, allegedly algivorous gastropods also consume leaf litter, and occasionally even living plant tissue. Periphyton, living plant, and detritus consumption by snails have seldom been compared directly. Two common pulmonate species...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Kent State University, 2001. Includes bibliographical references. Microfiche.
Thesis
Thesis (Ph.D., Biological Sciences / Aquatic Ecology) -- Kent State University, 2001. Includes eight chapters, bibliography, and appendix.
Article
Full-text available
OUTLINE: The ecology of shallow vs. deep lakes was concisely reviewed with emphasis on management issues. NOTE: This paper was Editor- but not peer-reviewed.
Article
Full-text available
OUTLINE: This article appeared in three parts on Ohio Shorelines, the newsletter of the Ohio Lake Management Society (OLMS), volumes 12(4), 1999, and 13(1) and (2), 2000 (Dana Oleskiewicz Editor). The article is intended to provide an overview of the ecology of aquatic plants in inland water bodies. Management suggestions and any other original ide...
Article
Full-text available
Macrophyte beds of the lake littoral host a diverse community of macroinvertebrates, from primary consumers to top predators. Different macrophyte species often support different macroinvertebrate communities. Complex leaf morphologies (plants with finely dissected leaves) usually support richer and/or more diverse invertebrate assemblages, probabl...

Questions

Questions (9)
Question
Hello there,
I need some help in understanding how an article suggested by a reviewer is applicable to a ms of mine currently under revision. Unfortunately the article is in Russian and I cannot extract the needed info, which apparently is in the text and not in Tables or Figures. The needed info is marginal in the Russian article, but can be important for my ms. The article is 13-page long, of which ~7 pages of text. If anybody knowledgeable in Russian has a little time to spare, please let me know and I will contact you with the article and the specifics. Thanks in advance!
-Paola
Question
Hello there,
I am trying to find solid scientific evidence that the partial "burying" of a Pinus picea tree trunk base under some soil is negative -- even detrimental -- to the tree health, even if the tree is mature and the depth of the "new" soil around the base of its trunk is only a few tens of cm.
Moving soil around pine tree trunks is a common practice during development and construction, typically to obtain a more desirable lawn/pavement slope, but it often leads to evident poor health and even death for the victimized trees.
Despite the common sight of impacted trees following such practices, I cannot find scientific evidence of this phenomenon, or how the soil accumulated around the tree trunk base leads to such catastrophic (for the tree) results.  I suspect something like the vascular system starts to rot because of prolonged, high humidity brought about by the contact with the (typically) humid soil, as P. picea is adapted to semi-arid conditions, but I cannot find any evidence for or against this idea.
Evidence presented in a scientific article, conference paper, technical report, etc., would be particularly welcome, but any piece of "official" information that goes beyond the anecdotal would do nicely.
Thanks a lot!
-Paola
Question
Hello, I am looking for recent (~1990s and forward) literature on invertebrate-moss associations in inland water ecosystems (lakes, streams, wetlands, canals, etc.).  Articles should focus on fully submerged or semi-aquatic moss and/or invertebrate species.  Articles in journals would be preferred, but easy-to-cite grey lit (e.g., USEPA technical reports) also would be appreciated -- anything that could stand in a soon-to-be-submitted manuscript that will have to pass through peer-review.  Also, any important literature citation on invertebrate-moss associations from other habitats (i.e., terrestrial), recent or historical, would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks a lot!

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Semiaquatic mosses may contribute to local "good" ecological status sensu the EU Water Framework Directive by increasing benthic spatial heterogeneity and, with it, benthic biodiversity. However, the role of lacustrine semiaquatic mosses in supporting benthic fauna remains unknown despite promising evidence from lotic mosses and submerged angiosperms in lakes. We have compared the macroinvertebrate fauna associated with gravel or with nearby small, isolated shoreline clumps of the moss Fontinalis antipyretica at an otherwise unvegetated, open-canopy, shallow (~0.5 m) site in Lake Piediluco, central Italy, during a growing season (March–December 2014). Gravel and moss hosted two different invertebrate assemblages with different seasonal dynamics. The site-wide invertebrate assemblage resulting from the integration of the sub-assemblages on gravel and moss was richer and more diverse than the sub-assemblages individually considered. The preliminarily elaborated data were presented in a poster at the 14th International Symposium on Aquatic Plants held in Edinburgh, Scotland, in September 2015. Though still not fully elaborated, our data strongly suggest that, even when its presence is marginal and patchy, lakeshore moss enhances local macroinvertebrate diversity as do submerged angiosperms and charophytes. Please check out the extended Abstract of the poster in the authors' "contributions" pages. Project updates will be released as data are further elaborated.
Project
Controlled laboratory experiments are carried out to assess the potential impact of one-time or periodic short-term exposure to air to selected species of lake littoral pulmonate snails. The first experiment (data collection completed) singled out Lymnaea stagnalis as the only species (among eight) capable of surviving up to 12 h of daily exposure to air at the egg stage. Ongoing experiments quantify the longer-term resistance to exposure to air of L. stagnalis eggs (June-July 2016) and the short-term resistance to exposure to air of post-hatching young through adult individuals (July-August 2016). The project is carried out with Dr. F. Paolo Miccoli of the University of L'Aquila. Production and submission of the first manuscripts for publication is expected to start in autumn 2016.