Pablo Gracia

Pablo Gracia
Trinity College Dublin | TCD · Department of Sociology

PhD
Assistant Professor of Sociology, Trinity College Dublin

About

40
Publications
14,930
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587
Citations
Citations since 2016
26 Research Items
536 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
Introduction
I am Assistant Professor of Sociology at Trinity College Dublin, where I lead a research team on Families and Inequalities. I obtained a PhD in Sociology at Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona and received parallel PhD training at the University of Oxford. I have been AMCIS Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Amsterdam and Max Weber Fellow at the European University Institute in Florence, as well as visiting fellow at leading academic institutions in my research fields.

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
Full-text available
Using time-diary data from the ‘2003 Spanish Time Use Survey’ (N = 2,941), I analysed two critical questions related to child development and gender equity. First, how do fathers of different levels of education adjust their parenting activities to their children’s developmental needs? Second, how does the mother’s employment affect paternal engage...
Article
This study uses time-diary data for dual-earner couples from Belgium, Denmark, Spain, and the United Kingdom to analyze educational inequalities in parental care time in different national contexts. For mothers, education is significantly associated with parenting involvement only in Spain and the United Kingdom. In Spain these differences are larg...
Article
Full-text available
This study analyses how the daily activities of children and adolescents differ by parents' work schedules, using data from the ‘2009–10 Spanish Time Use Survey’ (N = 913). Spain is an interesting institutional context for its widespread evening-work culture, combined with inflexible and gendered work-family arrangements. Results imply that parents...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the differences in child and adolescent time use across the following three countries with distinct policy and cultural regimes: Finland, Spain, and the United Kingdom. Studying children's time use cross‐nationally is urgent to better understand how societal contexts influence children's daily lives in ways that affect their fut...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the growing body of literature on how digital technologies impact child well-being, previous research has provided little evidence on recent digital trends. This paper examines the patterns and effects of digital use on child socioemotional well-being across two cohorts of children grown up ten years apart during the ‘digital age’: the 1998...
Preprint
This study uses high-quality longitudinal data from the Growing Up in Ireland to examine how home learning environment (HLE) and early childhood education (ECE) influence children’s early skills development across socioeconomic status (SES). Results from random-effects linear regression models indicate that: (1) higher SES is associated with higher...
Article
Full-text available
How divorce influences parents’ and children’s time use has received very little scientific attention. This study uses high-quality longitudinal time-diary data across six waves from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children to examine how parental separation shapes parent–child time and children’s daily activities. Results show that separation...
Preprint
Full-text available
This study addresses digital inequalities in young people’s daily lives and well-being. We examine how adolescents’ digital engagement differs across family socioeconomic status (SES) and gender, and how it relates to their psychological well-being. Analyses use longitudinal data from the Growing Up in Ireland study from age 9 to 18, combined with...
Preprint
Full-text available
This study uses high-quality longitudinal data from the Growing Up in Ireland (GUI) study to examine how digital engagement shapes socioemotional and educational outcomes from middle childhood to late adolescence across family socioeconomic status (SES). Results from fixed-effects regressions show that digital screen-time increases markedly from mi...
Article
Full-text available
This study uses largescale cross-national time-diary data from the Multinational Time Use Study (MTUS) (N = 201,972) covering the period from 2005 to 2015 to examine gender differences in time use by age groups. The study compares ten industrialized countries across Asia, Europe, and North America. In all ten countries, gender differences in time u...
Preprint
This study uses large-scale cross-national time-diary data from the Multinational Time Use Study (MTUS) (N = 201,972) covering the period from 2005 to 2015 to examine gender differences in time use by age groups. The study compares ten industrialized countries across Asia, Europe, and North America. In all ten countries, gender differences in time...
Article
Full-text available
Data from the European Working Conditions Surveys from 2005, 2010, and 2015 for 29 European countries show that the prevalence of nonstandard work schedules (evenings, nights, weekends, and rotating shifts) differs markedly across European regions with different public policies. Working nonstandard schedules also differs by education, gender, and p...
Article
Full-text available
This study used 2009–2015 time-diary data to examine gender differences in daily activities among children and adolescents aged 10–17 in Finland, Spain and the UK ( N = 3517). In all three countries, boys were significantly more involved in screen-based activities and exercising and girls in domestic work, non-screen educational activities and pers...
Preprint
Full-text available
Data from the ‘European Working Conditions Survey’ from 2005 to 2015 for 29 European countries show that the incidence of nonstandard work schedules (evenings, nights, weekends, rotating, shifts) differs remarkably across European regions with different public policies. Working nonstandard schedules differs by education, gender and parental status...
Preprint
Full-text available
Despite the growing body of literature on how digital technologies impact child well-being, previous research has provided little evidence on recent digital trends. This paper examines the patterns and effects of digital use on child socioemotional well-being across two cohorts of children grown up ten years apart during the ‘digital age’: the 1998...
Preprint
Full-text available
How children use their time is critical for their health, emotional, and cognitive development. Studies typically find that parental divorce lowers child development, due to a decline in parents’ monetary and time resources. Yet, little is known on how parental separation affects child time use. This study fills this relevant knowledge gap by using...
Preprint
Full-text available
Using three waves of the European Working Conditions Survey (2005-2015), we examined parental work schedules and hours across welfare regimes covering 29 European countries with attention to gender and socioeconomic gaps (N = 20,648). Multivariate logistic regression results revealed that: (1) nonstandard work schedules and overworking were more pr...
Preprint
Full-text available
This study uses 2009-2015 time-diary data to examine gender differences in daily activities among children and adolescents aged 10-17 in Finland, Spain and the UK (N = 3,517). Gender differences in child time use are strong in all three countries. Boys are more involved in screen-based time and exercising, and girls in domestic work, non-screen edu...
Preprint
Full-text available
This study investigates how child and adolescent time use differs across Finland, Italy, Spain and the UK, four countries capturing clearly distinct policy and cultural regimes. Studying children’s time use cross-nationally provides new understandings of the micro-macro drivers of children’s daily activities with critical implications for their per...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Minority students were found to have high educational aspirations, considering their background characteristics. This finding is often attributed to 'migrant optimism.' Yet, whether socioeconomic, educational, or demographic differences between and within ethnic groups mediate and/or moderate students' educational aspirations remains an...
Working Paper
Full-text available
The study of aspirations among the children of migrants is critical to understanding the future integration and opportunities of ethnic-minority students. Previous studies on the factors leading to ethnic differences in educational aspirations have provided limited and inconclusive evidence, restricted to only a few specific national contexts. This...
Article
Full-text available
This study used data on couples from the 2003 Spanish Time Use Survey (N = 1,416) to analyze how work schedules are associated with family, couple, parent-child, and non-family leisure activities. Spain is clearly an interesting case for the institutionalized split-shift schedule, a long lunch break rooted in the traditional siesta that splits the...
Article
Full-text available
This study used data from the 'Well Being Module' of the 2010 American Time Use Survey (N = 1699) to analyze how parents experience child care time in terms of meaning and stress levels. Multivariate multilevel regressions showed clear differences by gender and the circumstances of child care activities. Mothers experienced child care time as more...
Article
Full-text available
In this study we use time-diary data from Denmark, Spain, and the United Kingdom to analyze how fathers’ child care differs across countries with distinct gender norms, family policies, and maternal employment rates. We pay particular attention to the role of mothers’ paid work time in influencing paternal child care. Results show that Danish fathe...
Article
Full-text available
In Western Europe, the children of Moroccan and Turkish migrants were found to be significantly disadvantaged in the labour market. This ethnic gap was found to persist after considering differences in schooling, which was argued to reflect ‘ethnic penalties’ driven by cultural, religious, or racial factors. This study uses data from the 1st Wave o...
Article
Full-text available
We use data from the 2009/10 Wave of the Netherlands Longitudinal Lifecourse Study to analyze the employment participation and occupational status of Moroccan and Turkish Second Generation Migrants (SGM) in the Netherlands. By considering measures of family background (i.e. parental education, cultural capital) and skills (i.e. linguistic proficien...
Article
Full-text available
Using time-diary data from the ‘2003 Spanish Time Use Survey’ (N = 2,941), I analysed two critical questions related to child development and gender equity. First, how do fathers of different levels of education adjust their parenting activities to their children’s developmental needs? Second, how does the mother’s employment affect paternal engage...
Data
Full-text available
We address the issue of men's lagged adaptation to the ongoing revolution of women's roles. This article proposes a multiple equilibrium approach and shows how modes of couple specialization cluster around qualitatively distinct logics. We identify a traditional, egalitarian, and 'unstable' equilibrium. Theory posits that stable equilibria rest on...
Article
Full-text available
We address the issue of men’s lagged adaptation to the ongoing revolution of women’s roles. This article proposes a multiple equilibrium approach and shows how modes of couple specialization cluster around qualitatively distinct logics. We identify a traditional, egalitarian, and ‘unstable’ equilibrium. Theory posits that stable equilibria rest on...
Article
Studying paternal involvement in families with children of different ages is critical to better understand both children's well-being and gender relations. The present study sheds new light on the education gradient in paternal care engagement and on how father's child care participation intersects with women's employment, type of child care activi...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
1. Describing and documenting the contemporary links between parental work schedules and child well-being across nations 2. Examining the pathways by which parental work schedules is likely to affect child well-being 3. Further investigating the child, parent, family, and contextual factors that are likely to buffer or mediate the effects of parental work schedules on child development 4. Exploring policy and practice solutions in addressing the links between parental work schedules and child well-being 5. Providing implication and recommendations regarding the connection between parental work schedules and child well-being to inform policy and practice solutions and future research endeavor.