Pablo García‐Palacios

Pablo García‐Palacios
Spanish National Research Council | CSIC · Institute of Agricultural Sciences

www.garcia-palacios.com

About

86
Publications
61,522
Reads
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5,569
Citations
Additional affiliations
June 2015 - present
King Juan Carlos University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2013 - March 2015
Paul Valéry University, Montpellier 3
Position
  • Marie Curie Postdoctoral researcher
January 2012 - December 2012
Colorado State University
Position
  • Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellow

Publications

Publications (86)
Article
Full-text available
Phosphorus (P) acquisition is key for plant growth. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) help plants acquire P from soil. Understanding which factors drive AMF-supported nutrient uptake is essential to develop more sustainable agroecosystems. Here we collected soils from 150 cereal fields and 60 non-cropped grassland sites across a 3,000 km trans-Eur...
Article
Full-text available
Soil fungi are fundamental to plant productivity, yet their influence on the temporal stability of global terrestrial ecosystems, and their capacity to buffer plant productivity against extreme drought events, remain uncertain. Here we combined three independent global field surveys of soil fungi with a satellite-derived temporal assessment of plan...
Article
Full-text available
Soil carbon losses to the atmosphere, via soil heterotrophic respiration, are expected to increase in response to global warming, resulting in a positive carbon-climate feedback. Despite the well-known suite of abiotic and biotic factors controlling soil respiration, much less is known about how the magnitude of soil respiration responses to temper...
Article
Full-text available
Unprecedented nitrogen (N) inputs into terrestrial ecosystems have profoundly altered soil N cycling. Ammonia oxidizers and denitrifiers are the main producers of nitrous oxide (N2O), but it remains unclear how ammonia oxidizer and denitrifier abundances will respond to N loading and whether their responses can predict N-induced changes in soil N2O...
Article
Full-text available
Archaeal communities in arable soils are dominated by Nitrososphaeria, a class within Thaumarchaeota comprising all known ammonia‐oxidizing archaea (AOA). AOA are key players in the nitrogen cycle and defining their niche specialization can help predicting effects of environmental change on these communities. However, hierarchical effects of enviro...
Chapter
The decomposition of dead organic matter is critical for carbon and nutrient cycles across ecosystems from the bottom of oceans to mountain tops. Despite similarities in the driving abiotic and biotic factors, and interconnected flows of organic matter between streams and their surrounding riparian zones, litter decomposition has often been studied...
Article
Anthropogenic warming is expected to accelerate global soil organic carbon (SOC) losses via microbial decomposition, yet, there is still no consensus on the loss magnitude. In this Perspective, we argue that, despite the mechanistic uncertainty underlying these losses, there is confidence that a strong, positive land carbon–climate feedback can be...
Article
The functional traits of organisms within multispecies assemblages regulate biodiversity effects on ecosystem functioning. Yet how traits should assemble to boost multiple ecosystem functions simultaneously (multifunctionality) remains poorly explored. In a multibiome litter experiment covering most of the global variation in leaf trait spectra, we...
Article
Full-text available
In natural ecosystems, positive effects of plant diversity on ecosystem functioning have been widely observed, yet whether this is true in cropping systems remains unclear. Here we assessed the impact of crop diversification on soil microbial diversity, soil multifunctionality (SMF) and crop yields in 155 cereal fields across a 3,000 km north–south...
Article
Full-text available
Aims Conventional agriculture promotes negative feedbacks of soil microbes on crop performance (plant soil feedbacks, PSFs) by stimulating species-specific pathogens. Crop traits, modified by domestication, also influence PSFs. Therefore, we asked if crop cultivars and their wild progenitors promote soil pathogens and mutualists differently, and th...
Preprint
Full-text available
Soil carbon losses to the atmosphere, via soil heterotrophic respiration, are expected to increase in response to global warming, resulting in a positive carbon-climate feedback. Despite the well-known suite of abiotic and biotic factors controlling soil respiration, much less is known about how the magnitude of soil respiration responses to temper...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding whether soil microbial respiration adapts to the ambient thermal climate with an enhanced or compensatory response, hence potentially stimulating or slowing down soil carbon losses with warming, is key to accurately forecast and model climate change impacts on the global carbon cycle. Despite the interest in this topic and the plethor...
Article
Soil carbon losses to the atmosphere through soil respiration are expected to rise with ongoing temperature increases, but available evidence from mesic biomes suggests that such response disappears after a few years of experimental warming. However, there is lack of empirical basis for these temporal dynamics in soil respiration responses, and for...
Preprint
Full-text available
Soil carbon losses to the atmosphere through soil respiration are expected to rise with ongoing temperature increases, but available evidence from mesic biomes suggests that such response disappears after a few years of experimental warming. However, there is lack of empirical basis for these temporal dynamics in soil respiration responses, and of...
Article
Full-text available
Plant traits—the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants—determine how plants respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, and influence ecosystem properties and their benefits and detriments to people. Plant trait data thus represent the basis for a vast area of research sp...
Article
Full-text available
Multiple ecosystem functions need to be considered simultaneously to manage and protect the many ecosystem services that are essential to people and their environments. Despite this, cost effective, tangible, relatively simple, and globally‐relevant methodologies to monitor in situ soil multifunctionality, i.e. the provision of multiple ecosystem f...
Article
Full-text available
Plant diversity fosters productivity in natural ecosystems. Biodiversity effects might increase agricultural yields at no cost in additional inputs. However, the effects of diversity on crop assemblages are inconsistent, probably because crops and wild plants differ in a range of traits relevant to plant–plant interactions. We tested whether domest...
Article
The degree to which climate warming will stimulate soil organic carbon (SOC) losses via heterotrophic respiration remains uncertain, in part because different or even opposite microbial physiology and temperature relationships have been proposed in SOC models. We incorporated competing microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE)−mean annual temperature (...
Article
The distribution of organisms across ecosystem borders can be indicative of trophic interactions, food-web dynamics, and the potential for recovery after disturbance. Yet relatively little is known regarding patterns and ecology of belowground organisms across borders. Our hypothesis was that incremental zonation of vegetation and soil properties a...
Article
Drylands, which represent the world largest biome and support approximately 38% of the global human population, offer harsh climate and poor soil for agriculture. These environmental conditions are expected to get even harsher with climate change, challenging the potential to close the yield gap in these areas. In this short review, we focus on eco...
Article
Full-text available
Heterotrophic soil microbial respiration—one of the main processes of carbon loss from the soil to the atmosphere—is sensitive to temperature in the short term. However, how this sensitivity is affected by long-term thermal regimes is uncertain. There is an expectation that soil microbial respiration rates adapt to the ambient thermal regime, but w...
Article
The detritivore woodlouse Porcellio dilatatus was selected to test the effects of home-field advantage and land management on the isopod feeding preferences and ingestion rates. Woodlice specimens and plant litter from two neighbouring farms were used in “cafeteria” experiments. The farms are cork-oak agro-forests with a similar litter matrix but d...
Article
The insurance hypothesis, stating that biodiversity can increase ecosystem stability, has received wide research and political attention. Recent experiments suggest that climate change can impact how plant diversity influences ecosystem stability, but most evidence of the biodiversity-stability relationship obtained to date comes from local studies...
Article
Full-text available
A positive soil carbon (C)−climate feedback is embedded into the climatic models of the IPCC. However, recent global syntheses indicate that the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (RS) in drylands, the largest biome on Earth, is actually lower in warmed than in control plots. Consequently, soil C losses with future warming are expected to...
Article
Full-text available
Extracellular enzymes catalyze rate‐limiting steps in soil organic matter decomposition, and their activities (EEAs) play a key role in determining soil respiration (SR). Both EEAs and SR are highly sensitive to temperature, but their responses to climate warming remain poorly understood. Here, we present a meta‐analysis on the response of soil cel...
Article
Full-text available
Litter decomposition supplies nutrients and energy within and among aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. It is driven by several biotic and abiotic factors, the relative importance of which may change during litter decay. However, to date, very few studies have addressed the temporal dynamics of such factors across aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems...
Article
Organic farming enhances top soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks in croplands compared with conventional farming, which can contribute to sequester C. As farming system differences in the amount of C inputs to soil (e.g. fertilisation and crop residues) are not enough to explain such increase, shifts in crop residue traits important for soil C losses...
Article
Full-text available
Food security faces challenges that must be addressed from multiple perspectives. Ecology and agronomy contribute to that endeavour, allowing improvement in management practices. However, not only management affects food provision but also crop traits modulate key ecosystem services (ESs), including sustained yields. Here we highlight that understa...
Article
Full-text available
Climatic changes are altering Earth's hydrological cycle, resulting in altered precipitation amounts, increased inter-annual variability of precipitation, and more frequent extreme precipitation events. These trends will likely continue into the future, having substantial impacts on net primary productivity (NPP) and associated ecosystem services s...
Article
Full-text available
One of the main steps in road and railway embankment restoration is the spreading of previously removed topsoil, which provides an input of seeds, organic matter and microorganisms and encourages the establishment of a vegetation cover, essential to stabilise the embankment and blend it with the landscape. However, topsoil is a scarce resource, pro...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how drylands respond to ongoing environmental change is extremely important for global sustainability. In this review, we discuss how biotic attributes, climate, grazing pressure, land cover change, and nitrogen deposition affect the functioning of drylands at multiple spatial scales. Our synthesis highlights the importance of biotic...
Article
Full-text available
The mass ratio and niche complementarity mechanisms drive the influence of litter trait diversity on decomposition. However, the implications of these mechanisms remain poorly understood, as few studies have evaluated their importance relative to environmental conditions and soil decomposers when assessing different processes during decomposition (...
Article
Full-text available
Past global change studies have identified changes in species diversity as a major mechanism regulating temporal stability of production, measured as the ratio of the mean to the standard deviation of community biomass. However, the dominant plant functional group can also strongly determine the temporal stability. Here, in a grassland ecosystem su...
Data
Supplementary Figures 1-5, Supplementary Table 1
Article
Full-text available
Climate change-induced rainfall reductions in Mediterranean forests negatively affect the decomposition of plant litter through decreased soil moisture. However, the indirect effects of reduced precipitation on litter decomposition through changes in litter quality and soil microbial communities are poorly studied. This is especially the case for f...
Article
Full-text available
We lack both a theoretical framework and solid empirical data to understand domestication impacts on plant chemistry. We hypothesised that domestication increased leaf N and P to support high plant production rates, but biogeographic and climate patterns further influenced the magnitude and direction of changes in specific aspects of chemistry and...
Article
Full-text available
Climate, litter quality and decomposers drive litter decomposition. However, little is known about whether their relative contribution changes at different decomposition stages. To fill this gap, we evaluated the relative importance of leaf litter polyphenols, decomposer communities and soil moisture for litter C and N loss at different stages thro...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Integrar las comunidades del suelo en la teoría ecológica general es uno de los desafíos actuales de la Ecología Terrestre. Las comunidades de organismos del suelo son responsables de la descomposición y el reciclado de nutrientes, procesos esenciales para el funcionamiento de los ecosistemas terrestres y los ciclos biogeoquímicos a escala global....
Article
Full-text available
Climate and human impacts are changing the nitrogen (N) inputs and losses in terrestrial ecosystems. However, it is largely unknown how these two major drivers of global change will simultaneously influence the N cycle in drylands, the largest terrestrial biome on the planet. We conducted a global observational study to evaluate how aridity and hum...
Article
Full-text available
Plant leaf litter comprises the major common source of energy and nutrients in forested soil and freshwater ecosystems worldwide. However, despite the similarity of physical and biochemical processes, generalizations across aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems regarding litter decomposition drivers remain elusive. We reanalyzed data from a published...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years there has been an increase in research to understand how global changes’ impacts on soil biota translate into altered ecosystem functioning. However, results vary between global change effects, soil taxa and ecosystem processes studied, and a synthesis of relationships is lacking. Therefore, here we initiate such a synthesis to asse...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims: Many previous studies have evaluated aboveground–heterotrophic belowground interactions such as plant-soil feedbacks, plant-mycorrhizal fungi associations or plant-actinorhizal symbioses. However, few studies have used biocrusts, which are specialized soil communities of autotrophic cyanobacteria, mosses, lichens and non-photos...
Data
Full-text available
Plant-plant interactions are driven by environmental conditions, evolutionary relationships (ER) and the functional traits of the plants involved. However, studies addressing the relative importance of these drivers are rare, but crucial to improve our predictions of the effects of plant-plant interactions on plant communities and of how they respo...
Article
Full-text available
Plant-plant interactions are driven by environmental conditions, evolutionary relationships (ER) and the functional traits of the plants involved. However, studies addressing the relative importance of these drivers are rare, but crucial to improve our predictions of the effects of plant-plant interactions on plant communities and of how they respo...
Article
Full-text available
The biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are interlinked by primary production, respiration and decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems1. It has been suggested that the C, N and P cycles could become uncoupled under rapid climate change because of the different degrees of control exerted on the supply of these elemen...
Article
The biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are interlinked by primary production, respiration and decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems. It has been suggested that the C, N and P cycles could become uncoupled under rapid climate change because of the different degrees of control exerted on the supply of these element...
Article
Full-text available
Climate and litter quality have been identified as major drivers of litter decomposition at large spatial scales. However, the role played by soil fauna remains largely unknown, despite its importance for litter fragmentation and microbial activity. We synthesised litterbag studies to quantify the effect sizes of soil fauna on litter decomposition...
Article
Full-text available
While much is known about the factors that control each component of the terrestrial nitrogen (N) cycle, it is less clear how these factors affect total N availability, the sum of organic and inorganic forms potentially available to microorganisms and plants. This is particularly true for N-poor ecosystems such as drylands, which are highly sensiti...
Data
Pearsońs relationships between organic (DON and amino acids) and inorganic (ammonium and nitrate) N forms with aridity for both Stipa tenassicima (STIPA) and Bare soil (BS) microsites. Every data point is the average of five soil samples. Significance levels are as follows: *p<0.05, **p<0.01 and ***p<0.001. Ammonium, nitrate and DON were measured a...
Data
Pearson correlations coefficients. between available N and climatic (aridity), abiotic (pH; SAC: sand content), plant (CBA: coverage of bare ground; CHE: coverage of Stipa tenacissima; PA: plant patch area; API: Average plant patch interdistance; NP: number of plant patches per 10 m of transect) and nutrient (Organic-C; MIN; potential net mineraliz...
Data
Pearson correlations coefficients. between the different climatic (aridity), abiotic (pH; SAC: % of sand content), plant (CBA: % of coverage of bare ground; CHE: % of coverage of Stipa tenacissima; PA: plant patch area [m2]; API: Average plant patch interdistance [m]; NP: number of plant patches per 10 m of transect) and nutrient (Organic-C [%]; MI...
Data
Summary results of the semi-parametric PERMANOVA analyses carried out with organic carbon. PERMANOVA uses permutation tests to obtain p values, does not rely on the assumptions of traditional parametric ANOVA, and can handle experimental designs such as employed here (1). The model used evaluated the effects of plot (PL as random factor) and micros...
Data
Location, climatic, physical and main soil chemical characteristics in the studied sites. MAT = Mean annual temperature; MAP = Mean annual precipitation; Stipa = coverage of Stipa. (DOC)
Data
Relationships between organic (DON and amino acids) and inorganic (ammonium and nitrate) N forms with total available N for both Stipa tenassicima (STIPA) and Bare soil (BS) microsites. Every data point is the average of five soil samples. Significance levels are as follows: *p<0.05, **p<0.01 and ***p<0.001. Ammonium, nitrate and DON were measured...