Oxana Shevel

Oxana Shevel
Tufts University | Tufts · Department of Political Science

Doctor of Philosophy

About

31
Publications
8,330
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
429
Citations
Introduction
I specialize in comparative politics of the post-Communist region, in particular Ukraine and Russia. Thematically, my research has focused on nation- and state-building, the politics of citizenship and migration, memory politics, and church-state relations.
Additional affiliations
September 2007 - present
Tufts University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
September 2007 - present
Tufts University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Full-text available
This article surveys nation-building efforts in post-Soviet Russia. There have been five main nation-building projects reflecting the dominant ways of imagining the ‘true’ Russian nation but each has been fraught with contradictions and therefore have been unable to easily guide state policies. At the same time, a solution to the Russian nation-bui...
Article
Full-text available
Through a comparison of post-Franco Spain and post-Soviet Ukraine, Oxana Shevel examines state responses to the challenge of dealing with divided historical memory. Both countries embarked on the transition from authoritarian rule divided by the memory of the recent past, but each dealt with this similar challenge very differently. This article dis...
Book
Why do similar postcommunist states respond differently to refugees, with some being more receptive than others? Why do some states privilege certain refugee groups, while other states do not? This book presents a theory to account for this puzzle, and it centers on the role of the politics of nation-building and of the office of the UN High Commis...
Article
Full-text available
The fundamental dilemma in Ukraine's decommunization process is how to undo the legal, institutional, and historical legacy of the Soviet era without repeating the Soviet approach of mandating one ‘correct’ interpretation of the past …
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter analyzes the national citizenship regimes adopted by newly independent states— that is, states first appearing on the world political map during the era of popular sovereignty— and factors that influence the content of these regimes. The chapter examines how the goal of attaining state sovereignty, different visions of and debates over...
Article
Full-text available
How do people form beliefs about the factual content of major events when established geopolitical orders are violently challenged? Here, we address the tragic events of 2 May 2014, in Odesa, Ukraine. There, Euromaidan protest movement supporters and opponents clashed following Russia’s annexation of Crimea and the onset of the Donbas conflict, cul...
Chapter
Full-text available
Oxana Shevel takes up the theme of historical memory as a central component of Ukrainian identity. Conceptions of history have become pivotal in understanding what it means to be Ukrainian, and in particular the nature of the relationship between Ukraine and Russia. Shevel seeks to explain why these issues have become so polarized and what paths mi...
Article
Full-text available
Ukraine’s infamous decommunization legislation, enacted in May 2015, may be less divisive than it initially appeared. The laws ban positive public expression toward the Soviet past and mandate the renaming of thousands of localities with Soviet-era names. Critics have said that the laws will prohibit open discussion of Ukraine’s complex history and...
Article
Full-text available
The October 2014 legislative elections can be regarded as a watershed event in the political history of post-Soviet Ukraine. Held after the ousting of former President Viktor Yanukovych as a result of Euromaidan protests, the elections produced the first ever pro-western constitutional majority in the Ukrainian legislature. The article addresses th...
Article
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
Massive street protests in 2004 in Ukraine that became known as the Orange Revolution led to the overturning of fraudulent presidential election results, accession of pro-western Viktor Yushchenko to presidency, and wide spread expectations of rapid democratization, westernization, and socioeconomic advances of the country. As these hopes failed to...
Chapter
Full-text available
While the fall of the Berlin Wall is positively commemorated in the West, the intervening years have shown that the former Soviet Bloc has a more complicated view of its legacy. In post-communist Eastern Europe, the way people remember state socialism is closely intertwined with the manner in which they envision historical justice. Twenty Years Aft...
Article
Full-text available
Russian citizenship policy has evolved in puzzling ways from the 1990s, when all former Soviet citizens were entitled to simplified access to Russian citizenship, to the 2002 citizenship law, which put an abrupt end to this policy, giving few but those born on the territory of Russia the right to citizenship. Since 2002, the right to Russian citize...
Article
Full-text available
This study surveys nation-building efforts in post-Soviet Russia, and shows how all five main nation-building projects reflecting the dominant ways of imagining the “true” Russian nation have been fraught with contradictions and therefore could not easily guide state policies. At the same time, a solution to Russian nation-building dilemma may be e...
Article
Full-text available
In the 1990s, a number of post-Communist states adopted diaspora laws that defined the target group ethno-culturally, thus seemingly confirming the continued relevance of Hans Kohn’s distinction between ethnic Eastern and civic Western nationalism. This article, however, posits that while Kohn’s dichotomy may be valid, its related implications are...
Article
Full-text available
The politics of national identity influences citizenship rules in new states, but not in the way that existing theories would predict. Existing theories attribute ethnic or civic citizenship laws to dominant ethnic or civic national identity conceptions, but in many new states there is no dominant national identity conception. In the post-Soviet re...
Article
Full-text available
The paper investigates a puzzling evolution of the post-Soviet Russia's citizenship policy. Over the course of the 1990s Russia's "official" nation – the group eligible for citizenship acquisition under simplified rules – has been dramatically re-defined in the successive editions of the citizenship law. In the 1990s, Russia defined its official na...
Article
Full-text available
Nikolai A. Shulga, Velikoe pereselenie narodov: repatrianty, bezhentsy, trudovye migranty. Kiev: Institut Sotsiologii NAN Ukrainy, 2002, 700 pp, tables, figures. - Volume 31 Issue 3 - Oxana Shevel
Article
Full-text available
Although the fall of empires gives rise to states, it need not create nations. The collapse of the Soviet Union 10 years ago did not instantly transform citizens of its successor states into members of nations. As in other postimperial settings, in post-Soviet Ukraine the modern nation is built, or not. The question of Ukrainian nationbuilding dese...
Article
Full-text available
This paper analyzes the effects of international organizations on Ukrainian citizenship policies in the post-1991 period. As over 250,000 Crimean Tatars repatriated to Ukraine in the late 1980s and early 1990s after being forcefully deported in 1944, some 100,000 of them found themselves without Ukrainian citizenship, of which some 25,000 were stat...

Network

Cited By