Outi Tuomainen

Outi Tuomainen
Universität Potsdam · Department Linguistik

PhD

About

37
Publications
10,451
Reads
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277
Citations
Introduction
Outi Tuomainen currently works at the Department of Linguistics at the University of Potsdam, Germany. Outi does research in Speech Sciences and Developmental Psychology. Their current project investigates masking effects across the lifespan.
Additional affiliations
December 2013 - present
University College London
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
When attempting to maintain conversations in noisy communicative settings, talkers typically modify their speech to make themselves understood by the listener. In this study, we investigated the impact of background interference type and talker age on speech adaptations, vocal effort and communicative success. We measured speech acoustics (articula...
Article
Full-text available
Psychophysical thresholds were measured for 8–16 year-old children with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss (MMHL; N = 46) on a battery of auditory processing tasks that included measures designed to be dependent upon frequency selectivity and sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) or envelope cues. Children with MMHL who wore hearing...
Article
Full-text available
Auditory deprivation in the form of deafness during development leads to lasting changes in central auditory system function. However, less is known about the effects of mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss (MMHL) during development. Here, we used a longitudinal design to examine late auditory evoked responses and mismatch responses to nonsp...
Conference Paper
The impact of energetic (EM) and informational masking (IM) on speech communication is typically evaluated using perception tests that do not involve actual communication. Here, ratings of effort, concentration and degree of interference were obtained for 51 young, middle-aged and older adults after they had completed communicative tasks (Diapix) w...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study investigated whether seeing a conversational partner while carrying out a collaborative task (diapix) in easy and difficult communicative conditions affected clear speech adaptations in older and young adults. 17 older (OA) and 13 young (YA) women were recorded while doing diapix with a conversational partner; in one condition, they coul...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Disfluencies are a pervasive feature of speech communication. Their function in communication is still widely discussed with some proposing that their usage might aid understanding. Accordingly, talkers may produce more disfluencies when conversing in adverse communicative situations, e.g. in background noise. Moreover, increasing age may have an e...
Article
A related paper [Hazan et al., 2018b, Hearing Research], showed that, for young adult listeners, speech produced by older adults was less intelligible than the speech of young adults but both talker groups improved the intelligibility of their speech via clear speech modifications. Here, this study was extended to include older listeners with/witho...
Preprint
Full-text available
Psychophysical thresholds were measured for 8-16 year-old children with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss (MMHL; N = 46) on a battery of auditory processing tasks that included measures designed to be predominantly reliant upon frequency selectivity, and sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) or envelope cues. Children with MMHL who...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Most communication in everyday life takes place in less than ideal listening conditions and the presence of noise or other voices in the background is often challenging for older adults. This study investigated how the informational content of the background noise affects communication in age-matched younger and older talker pairs. We used an inter...
Article
The study investigated the speech adaptations by older adults (OA) with and without age-related hearing loss made to communicate effectively in challenging communicative conditions. Acoustic analyses were carried out on spontaneous speech produced during a problem-solving task (diapix) carried out by talker pairs in different listening conditions....
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates whether clear speech strategies vary according to the demands of the task used for eliciting clear speech. Spontaneous speech involves greater planning than sentence reading and this might particularly affect talkers who find communication more effortful. 77 talkers (24 young and 53 older adults) carried out two collaborativ...
Chapter
Full-text available
In order to investigate the clear speech adaptations that individuals make when communicating in intelligibility-challenging conditions, it would seem essential to examine speech that is produced in interaction with a conversational partner. However, much of the literature on clear speech adaptations has been based on the analysis of sentences that...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the relation between the intelligibility of conversational and clear speech produced by older and younger adults and (a) the acoustic profile of their speech (b) communication effectiveness. Speech samples from 30 talkers from the elderLUCID corpus were used: 10 young adults (YA), 10 older adults with normal hearing (OANH) a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In order to investigate the clear speech adaptations that individuals make when communicating in intelligibility-challenging conditions, it would seem essential to examine speech that is produced in interaction with a conversational partner. However, much of the literature on clear speech adaptations has been based on the analysis of sentences that...
Article
Full-text available
Speech communication can be difficult for older people, due to the combined effects of age-related hearing loss, which is common over the age of 65, age-related decline in the quality of phonation and speech articulation, and cognitive problems such as poorer short-term memory and processing speed. Past studies of how older individuals perceive and...
Article
This study investigates whether a “clear speech benefit” is obtained for speech produced by older (OA) talkers and younger adult (YA) controls in a clear speaking style when heard in babble noise. The speech materials were recorded while OA and YA talkers read BKB sentences to a YA partner who repeated the sentence while hearing normally (NORM) or...
Article
Full-text available
Background Stuttering and word-finding difficulty (WFD) are two types of communication difficulty that occur frequently in children who learn English as an additional language (EAL), as well as those who only speak English. The two disorders require different, specific forms of intervention. Prior research has described the symptoms of each type o...
Article
Full-text available
There is a general consensus that many children and adults with dyslexia and/or specific language impairment display deficits in auditory processing. However, how these deficits are related to developmental disorders of language is uncertain, and at least four categories of model have been proposed: single distal cause models, risk factor models, a...
Conference Paper
The study examined the partner-directed gaze patterns of old and young talkers in a task (DiapixUK) that involved two people (a lead talker and a follower) engaging in a spontaneous dialogue. The aim was (1) to determine whether older adults engage less in partner-directed gaze than younger adults by measuring mean gaze frequency and mean total gaz...
Poster
Full-text available
In everyday communication, speech production is guided by how well our speech is being understood by our interlocutors, and talkers adapt their speech according to the needs of the listener. These modifications aim to enhance speech intelligibility especially in difficult communicative contexts (‘clear speech benefit’). However, speech communicatio...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: The goal of this study was to examine language development and factors related to language impairments in children with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss (MMHL). Method: Ninety children, aged 8-16 years (46 children with MMHL; 44 aged-matched controls), were administered a battery of standardized language assessments, includin...
Poster
Our study investigates strategies used to clarify our speech and compensate for masking effects when communicating in challenging listening conditions in older and younger adults. A total of 50 older (OA, 65-85 years, 30 F) and 23 younger adults (YA, 18-35 years, 14 F) were recorded (in “Talker A” role) while they completed the problem-solving diap...
Article
This study investigated whether adaptations made in clear speaking styles result in more discriminable phonetic categories than in a casual style. Multiple iterations of keywords with word-initial /s/-/ʃ/ were obtained from 40 adults in casual and clear speech via picture description. For centroids, cross-category distance increased in clear speech...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Speech communication becomes increasingly difficult with age, especially in adverse listening conditions. We compared speech adaptations made by 'older adult' (65-84 years) and 'younger adult' (19-26 years) talkers when speech is produced with communicative intent. The aim was to investigate how articulation rate is affected by the type of adverse...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Purpose: This study investigated the acoustic characteristics of spontaneous speech by 9-14 year olds, and their ability to adapt these characteristics to maintain effective communication when intelligibility was artificially degraded for their interlocutor. Methods: Recordings were made for 96 children (50 F, 46 M) engaged in a problem-...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated vowel space area (VSA) development in childhood and adolescence and its impact on the ability to hyperarticulate vowels. In experiment 1, 96 participants aged 9-14 years carried out an interactive task when communication was easy (no barrier, 'NB') and difficult (the speech of one participant was filtered through a vocoder,...
Article
Full-text available
When asked to speak clearly, talkers make adaptations to various acoustic characteristics of their speech. Do these adaptations specifically enhance phonetic contrasts or just result in more global enhancements? For phonetic contrasts, increased discriminability could be achieved by increasing between-category distance, reducing within-category dis...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The aim of our study was to investigate whether children distinguish between 'new' and 'given' information via phonetic reduction in spontaneous speech in a similar way to adults. An interactive 'spot the difference' game was used to elicit spontaneous speech. Word duration, fundamental frequency and vowel formant frequencies in repeated content wo...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates phonetic categorisation and cue weighting in adolescents and young adults with Specific Language Impairment (SLI). We manipulated two acoustic cues, vowel duration and F1 offset frequency, that signal word-final stop consonant voicing ([t] and [d]) in English. Ten individuals with SLI (14.0-21.4 years), 10 age-matched contro...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates nonspeech and speech processing in specific language impairment (SLI) and dyslexia. We used a passive mismatch negativity (MMN) task to tap automatic brain responses and an active behavioural task to tap attended discrimination of nonspeech and speech sounds. Using the roving standard MMN paradigm, we varied the number of st...
Conference Paper
This study investigated (a) the acoustic-phonetic characteristics of spontaneous speech produced by talkers aged 9–14 years in an interactive (diapix) task with an interlocutor of the same age and gender (NB condition) and (b) the adaptations these talkers made to clarify their speech when speech intelligibility was artificially degraded for their...
Article
Full-text available
This thesis investigates auditory and speech processing in Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and dyslexia. One influential theory of SLI and dyslexia postulates that both SLI and dyslexia stem from similar underlying sensory deficit that impacts speech perception and phonological development leading to oral language and literacy deficits. Previous...
Article
Full-text available
Speech perception normally utilizes multiple acoustic cues in perception of specific speech sound contrast. This study investigates which acoustic cues are responsible for syllable final stop consonant voicing in English using speech and non-speech stimuli. Specifically we study vocalic duration and F1 offset frequency cues using three experimental...
Article
Full-text available
Proficiency in a second language (L2) may depend upon the age of exposure and the continued use of the mother tongue (L1) during L2 acquisition. The effect of early L2 exposure on the preattentive perception of native and non-native vowel contrasts was studied by measuring the mismatch negativity (MMN) response from 14-year-old children. The test g...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Speech perception normally utilizes multiple acoustic cues in perception of specific speech sound contrast. This study investigates which acoustic cues are responsible for syllable final stop consonant voicing in English using speech and non-speech stimuli. Specifically we study vocalic duration and F1 offset frequency cues using three experimental...

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Project (1)
Project
This research project investigates the impact of ageing on speech communication in good and adverse listening conditions. Speech communication in older talkers is affected by multiple factors: age-related hearing loss, declines in motor control, how the brain processes incoming information and how we remember facts. The aim of this project is to achieve a better understanding of the effects of ageing on speech communication and of the various contributing factors to potentially degraded speech communication in a population of ‘healthy aged’ individuals. In this project we are looking at speech production (acoustic-phonetic features), voice characteristics, head movement and eye contact (face tracking), cognitive function and sensory acuity (hearing thresholds) when communication becomes effortful (e.g., in background noise).