Oriana Kilbourn-Ceron

Oriana Kilbourn-Ceron
Northwestern University | NU · Department of Linguistics

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

About

13
Publications
1,251
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
39
Citations
Introduction
How does the real-time planning of speech affect the pronunciation of what we end up saying? I'm pursing the idea that variable phonological patterns are influenced by speech production planning. In spontaneous speech, I found that speakers are less likely to use contextual variants (English flaps, French liaison) when the upcoming context is difficult to plan. I found a similar result in a production experiment, and found that speakers use more flaps when they have a longer time to plan.
Additional affiliations
February 2019 - present
Northwestern University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Funded by B3 Postdoctoral Fellowship from Fonds de Recherche du Québec, Société et Culture
August 2017 - December 2018
Concordia University Montreal
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
August 2011 - July 2017
McGill University
Field of study
  • Linguistics
August 2007 - May 2011
Concordia University Montreal
Field of study
  • Linguistics

Publications

Publications (13)
Chapter
This chapter investigates some implications of Spell-Out in a phase-based, realizational derivational system. It is argued that all operations on the PF branch within a phase, specifically Vocabulary Insertion and phonological rule application are predicted to have isomorphic domains of application. This has implications for the proposals on how to...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Conference paper available: http://www.icphs2015.info/pdfs/Papers/ICPHS0932.pdf
Research
Full-text available
Recent work in the domain of scalar implicatures argues for the existence of a grammatical device of covert exhaustification exh (Krifka 1995; Chierchia 2006; Fox 2007; Fox and Spector 2009; Chierchia et al. 2011; Sauerland 2012). This covert operator strengthens sentence meanings in a way similar to neo-Gricean quantity inferences, but is cruciall...
Article
In two speech production experiments, we investigated the link between phonetic variation and the scope of advance planning at the word form encoding stage. We examined cases where a word has, in addition to the pronunciation of the word in isolation, a context-specific pronunciation variant that appears only when the following word includes specif...
Preprint
Full-text available
In two speech production experiments, we investigated the link between phonetic variation and the scope of advance planning at the word form encoding stage. We examined cases where a word has, in addition to the pronunciation of the word in isolation, a context-specific pronunciation variant that appears only when the following word includes specif...
Conference Paper
No PDF available ABSTRACT We examine how constraints on advance planning in speech production impact word form variation. A /t/ can be produced as a flap only when it's followed by a vowel (e.g., in “atom” and “great exam”). Planning can influence this process by restricting the availability of the following vowel during planning of the /t/. We tes...
Article
Full-text available
Speakers learning a second language show systematic differences from native speakers in the retrieval, planning, and articulation of speech. A key challenge in examining the interrelationship between these differences at various stages of production is the need for manual annotation of fine-grained properties of speech. We introduce a new method fo...
Article
Full-text available
Predictability has been shown to be associated with many dimensions of variation in speech, including durational variation and variable omission of segments. However, the mechanism or mechanisms that underlie these effects are still unclear. This paper presents data on a new aspect of predictability in speech, namely how it affects allophonic varia...
Article
Full-text available
Devoicing of high vowels (HVD) in Tokyo Japanese applies in two environments—between voiceless consonants, and between a voiceless consonant and a “pause”—and applies variably as a function of a number of factors. The role and definition of “pause” in this process, in terms of a physical pause or prosodic position (word or phrase boundary), remains...
Article
Full-text available
Connected speech processes have played a major role in shaping theories about phonological organization, and how phonology interacts with other components of the grammar (Selkirk, 1974; Kiparsky, 1982; Kaisse, 1985; Nespor and Vogel, 1986, among others). External sandhi is subject to locality conditions, and it is more variable compared to processe...
Research
Full-text available
The place of variation in phonology is the subject of ongoing investigation and debate. Variable allophonic processes are problematic for strictly categorical models of phonology in two ways: their outcome is not deterministic, which phonological computation is traditionally assumed to be, and the probabilities associated with these processes are o...
Conference Paper
http://www.lingref.com/cpp/wccfl/32/abstract3163.html The modifier almost indicates, intuitively, that the modified constituent is at least close to being true, but is not in fact true. For example, the sentence Bill almost swam the English Channel tells us (i) that Bill came close to swimming the Channel and (ii) that Bill did not swim the Channe...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The alternation in English between coronal stops /t,d/ and alveolar flap when intervocalic is nearly categorical when the VTV sequence is within a word, but is variable when a word boundary intervenes and occurs only rarely across a large boundary such as a clause edge. This pattern is common across many processes cross-linguistically – but why are segmental processes at word edges often more variable, and what influences the rate of variability? Previous literature that addressed phonological variability has proposed that phonological rules have to make reference to syntactic structure or that phonological process are tied to certain prosodic domains. In contrast, we propose that phonological variability is only indirectly influenced by syntax and prosody through the locality of production planning (LPP). This hypothesis is motivated based on psycholinguistic models of speech production, and we test its predictions for English flapping in a corpus study and a production experiment. Results show that syntax may have an effect above and beyond prosodic boundary strength, and that the lexical frequency of the following word has a significant influence on rate of flapping, both effects being consistent with and explained by the LPP hypothesis.