Oona Snoeyenbos-West

Oona Snoeyenbos-West
The University of Arizona | UA · Environmental Science

PhD. (Biology) PhD. (Geoscience)

About

63
Publications
13,037
Reads
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2,921
Citations
Citations since 2016
14 Research Items
1585 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
Introduction
I work on Life in the Underground: Fungal & prokaryote diversity and microbial ecology in the deep subsurface; with a focus on bioremediation and bioprospecting. I also work on biogeochemical cycling in the gut microbiome and the electromicrobiome.
Additional affiliations
March 2014 - May 2016
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Position
  • Senior Researcher
March 2013 - March 2014
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Position
  • Senior Researcher
January 2013 - January 2016
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Position
  • Adjunct Professor

Publications

Publications (63)
Article
Full-text available
Coastal sediments are rich in conductive particles, possibly affecting microbial processes for which acetate is a central intermediate. In the methanogenic zone, acetate is consumed by methanogens and/or syntrophic acetate-oxidizing (SAO) consortia. SAO consortia live under extreme thermodynamic pressure, and their survival depends on successful pa...
Article
Full-text available
Direct electron uptake by prokaryotes is a recently described mechanism with a potential application for energy and CO2 storage into value added chemicals. Members of Methanosarcinales, an environmentally and biotechnologically relevant group of methanogens, were previously shown to retrieve electrons from an extracellular electrogenic partner perf...
Article
Full-text available
Microbially induced corrosion of metallic iron (Fe0)-containing structures is an environmental and economic hazard. Methanogens are abundant in low-sulfide environments and yet their specific role in Fe0 corrosion is poorly understood. In this study, Sporomusa and Methanosarcina dominated enrichments from Baltic Sea methanogenic sediments that were...
Article
Full-text available
Recent discoveries of extant and fossilized communities indicate that eukaryotes, including fungi, inhabit energy-poor and anoxic environments deep within the fractured igneous crust. This subterranean biosphere may constitute the largest fungal habitat on our planet, but knowledge of abyssal fungi and their syntrophic interactions with prokaryotes...
Article
Full-text available
A growing literature of deep but also surficial fossilized remains of lithobiological life, often associated with igneous rocks, necessitates the unfolding of a sub-discipline within paleobiology. Here, we introduce the term paleolithobiology as the new auxiliary sub-discipline under which fossilized lithobiology should be handled. We present key c...
Preprint
Full-text available
Microbial induced corrosion of steel structures, used for transport or storage of fuels, chemical weapons or waste radionuclides, is an environmental and economic threat. In non-sulfidic environments, the exact role of methanogens in steel corrosion is poorly understood. From the non-sulfidic, methanogenic sediments of the Baltic Sea corrosive comm...
Preprint
Full-text available
Direct electron uptake by prokaryotes is a recently described mechanism with a potential application for energy and CO2 storage into value added chemicals. Members of Methanosarcinales, an environmentally and biotechnologically relevant group of methanogens, were previously shown to retrieve electrons from an extracellular electrogenic partner perf...
Article
Deoxygenation is a critical problem facing the ocean as the world warms, and has the potential to effect coastal upwelling zones, shelf areas influenced by high runoff and nutrification, and restricted and semi-restricted basins. The mechanisms that drive deoxygenation in these diverse environments are still not fully understood, in part because th...
Preprint
Full-text available
Coastal sediments are rich in conductive minerals, which could impact microbial processes for which acetate is a central intermediate. In the methanogenic zone, acetate is consumed by methanogens and/or syntrophic acetate oxidizing (SAO) consortia. SAO consortia live under extreme thermodynamic pressure and their survival depends on successful part...
Article
Full-text available
Studies on the mechanisms for extracellular electron transfer in Geobacter species have primarily focused on Geobacter sulfurreducens, but the poor conservation of genes for some electron transfer components within the Geobacter genus suggests that there may be a diversity of extracellular electron transport strategies among Geobacter species. Exam...
Article
Full-text available
Several experiments were conducted to determine whether protozoan grazing can reduce current output from sediment microbial fuel cells. When marine sediments were amended with eukaryotic inhibitors, the power output from the fuel cells increased 2-5-fold. Quantitative PCR showed that Geobacteraceae sequences were 120times more abundant on anodes fr...
Article
Previous studies have suggested that the conductive pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens are essential for extracellular electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides and for optimal long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms. The KN400 strain of G. sulfurreducens reduces poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide more rapidly than the more extensive...
Article
Previous studies have suggested that the conductive pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens are essential for extracellular electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides and for optimal long-range electron transport through current-producing biofilms. The KN400 strain of G. sulfurreducens reduces poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide more rapidly than the more extensive...
Article
Full-text available
Microbial oxidation of elemental sulfur with an electrode serving as the electron acceptor is of interest because this may play an important role in the recovery of electrons from sulfidic wastes and for current production in marine benthic microbial fuel cells. Enrichments initiated with a marine sediment inoculum, with elemental sulfur as the ele...
Article
Full-text available
Unlabelled: It has been proposed that Geobacter sulfurreducens requires conductive pili for long-range electron transport to Fe(III) oxides and for high-density current production in microbial fuel cells. In order to investigate this further, we constructed a strain of G. sulfurreducens, designated Aro-5, which produced pili with diminished conduc...
Data
Bacterial strains and plasmids used in this study.
Data
Primers used for RT-qPCR and recombinant strain construction.
Article
Full-text available
Microbial electrosynthesis is a promising strategy for the microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to transportation fuels and other organic commodities, but optimization of this process is required for commercialization. Cathodes which enhance electrode–microbe electron transfer might improve rates of product formation. To evaluate this possibility...
Article
Molecular genetic and biogeochemical analyses of recent microbial communities allows for targeting of specific organisms and their metabolites/biomarkers to use for paleoenvironmental reconstruction of early Earth. Of these, the distribution of wax esters (WE) in evaporative microbial mats suggests that they are the favored biosynthetic products du...
Article
Full-text available
Microbial electrosynthesis, a process in which microorganisms use electrons derived from electrodes to reduce carbon dioxide to multicarbon, extracellular organic compounds, is a potential strategy for capturing electrical energy in carbon-carbon bonds of readily stored and easily distributed products, such as transportation fuels. To date, only on...
Article
Full-text available
High levels of synonymous substitutions among alleles of the surface antigen SerH led to the hypothesis that Tetrahymena thermophila has a tremendously large effective population size, one that is greater than estimated for many prokaryotes (Lynch, M., and J. S. Conery. 2003. Science 302:1401-1404.). Here we show that SerH is unusual as there are s...
Article
Groundwater from an oxic, fractured basalt aquifer was examined for the presence of Archaea. DNA was extracted from cells concentrated from groundwater collected from five wells penetrating the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer (Idaho, USA). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of 16S rDNA was performed with Archaea-specific primers using...
Article
Full-text available
Current debate on microbial diversity contrasts the 'cosmopolitan' hypothesis, which argues for high gene flow and low diversity, with the 'endemism' hypothesis, which argues for high diversity and geographically restricted gene flow. Our analyses of genetic variation in ciliate morphospecies isolated from ephemeral environments (freshwater ponds a...
Article
We are exploring the evolutionary implications of genome duality in ciliates. Ciliates possess both a somatic macronucleus (MAC) and a germline micronucleus (MIC). Only the MAC is transcriptionally active, and divides by amitosis rather than mitosis and meiosis. We have previously hypothesized that genome duality is the driving force behind the het...
Article
Full-text available
Biogeography of microbial eukaryotes is widely debated. While some claim that all microbial organisms have a cosmopolitan distribution, other data suggest evidence of endemism. To assess these hypotheses for the distribution of ciliates in the orders Choreotrichia and Oligotrichia, coastal community samples were taken from Long Island Sound. We are...
Article
We find tremendous genetic diversity underlying the morphological entity Strombidium occulatum. We used multi-locus sequence data to examine molecular diversity within S. occulatum across space and time so as to explore the biogeography and biodiversity of this marine ciliate species. We are sequenceing the internally transcribed spacer regions (IT...
Article
We analyze small subunit ribosomal DNA (ssu-rDNA) sequences to evaluate both the monophyly of the ciliate class Phyllopharyngea de Puytorac et al. (1974), and relationships among subclasses. Classifications based on morphology and ultrastructure divide the Phyllopharyngea into four subclasses: the Phyllopharyngia, Chonotrichia, Rhynchodia and Sucto...
Article
We analyzed small subunit ribosomal DNA (ssu-rDNA) sequences to evaluate both the monophyly of the ciliate class Phyllopharyngea de Puytorac et al. (1974), and relationships among subclasses. Classifications based on morphology and ultrastructure divide the Phyllopharyngea into four subclasses, the Phyllopharyngia, Chonotrichia, Rhynchodia, and Suc...
Article
Ciliates are a group of microbial eukaryotes defined by the presence of dimorphic nuclei-each cell contains both a transcriptionally active macronucleus and a germline micronucleus. During the development of the macronucleus, germline chromosomes are rearranged through extensive fragmentation, removal of internally excised sequences (IESs) and DNA...
Article
Full-text available
Microbial diversity in four wells along a groundwater flowpath in a coal-tar-waste-contaminated aquifer was examined using RFLP analysis of both 16S rDNA and naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) genes. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) relied upon eubacteria-specific primers to generate four clone libraries. From each library, 100 clone...
Article
Full-text available
To examine relationships among spirotrich ciliates using multi-locus sequence analyses and to provide preliminary insights into molecular diversity within species, we sequenced the small subunit rDNA (SSU rDNA), 5.8S rDNA, alpha-tubulin and the internally transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 and ITS2) of the rDNA genes from seven choreotrich (Class: Sp...
Article
Full-text available
To examine relationships among spirotrich ciliates using multi-locus sequence analyses and to provide preliminary insights into molecular diversity within species, we sequenced the small subunit rDNA (SSU rDNA), 5.8S rDNA, alpha-tubulin and the internally transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 and ITS2) of the rDNA genes from seven choreotrich (Class: Sp...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we report on the development of quantitative PCR and reverse transcriptase PCR assays for the 16S rRNA ofGeobacter spp. and identify key issues related to fluorogenic reporter systems for nucleic acid analyses of sediments. The lower detection limit of each assay was 5 to 50 fg of genomic DNA or ≤2 pg of 16S rRNA. TaqMan PCR spectral...
Article
Full-text available
Engineered stimulation of Fe(III) has been proposed as a strategy to enhance the immobilization of radioactive and toxic metals in metal-contaminated subsurface environments. Therefore, laboratory and field studies were conducted to determine which microbial populations would respond to stimulation of Fe(III) reduction in the sediments of sandy aqu...
Chapter
Full-text available
Foraminifera in shales and mudrocks of the Greenhorn Cycle (late Cenomanian-middle Turonian age) in the Cretaceous Western Interior Basin were strongly influenced by sea level change. This long-term record of third-order sea level rise and fall is superposed by fourth-order relative sea level cycles as delimited by carbonate and sedimentological da...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Cenomanian-Turonian boundary interval (93-94 Ma) was a time of rapid oceanographic change in the U.S. Western Interior Sea ("Greenhorn Sea"). Previous studies documented changes in δ180 in carbonates and shifts in macrofossil (molluscan) populations indicating the incursion of a subsaline surface-water mass into the region and dysoxic to anoxic...
Article
Typescript. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 1998. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 153-164).
Article
Full-text available
Organelles, fibrillar bodies, present in the cytoplasm of all planktic foraminifera may have originated as intracellular symbiotic bacteria. Those in Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, are squat to elongate ovoids and elongate rods with a length of 2–15 μm and a diameter of 2–5 μm. They are bounded by a membrane-like structure, and sometimes more than o...
Article
Full-text available
The Gaia hypothesis states that the atmosphere, hydrosphere, surface sediments, and life on Earth behave dynamically as a single integrated physiological system. What has been traditionally viewed as the passive environment is a highly active, integral part of the gaian system. Aspects of the surface temperature and chemistry are regulated by the s...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
I am running growth curves on a BioTek Plate reader using Gen5 software. Kinetic analysis of bacterial growth (OD=600) is output as raw OD data and VMax of the blanked OD data. How does VMax relate to growth rate (k) and doubling time (g)? Is VMax the logarithmically scaled data and thus = to the growth rate? OR is there another data transformation that needs to be done to calculate growth rate from VMax??
Question
I want to use DynabeadsMyOne C1 magnetic beads to capture sequence-specific DNA. I will attach biotynilated ss oligos to my beads as the protocol outlines to produce immobilized oligos on the beads. My question concerns the subsequent hybridization of these bead attached, gene specific probes to my genomic DNA, i.e., what hybridization buffer(s) do I use? Can you suggest or recommend what to use to do my hybridizations between my magnetic bead bound probe and my DNA genomic template? Are there standard buffers such as SSC or is there some other I should use? Also how exactly does one dry out the hybridization in a tube and for what length of time? I have done hybridization on membranes, etc. but for some reason this has me stumped! Any help or advice is greatly appreciated!

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Electroactivity in the ascomycete Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been known for over a century. More recently, current production both with and without mediators, has been shown in S. cervassia using microbial fuel cells (MFC). We have demonstrated electricity harvesting in a double-chambered, poised potential MFC, both with and without yeast extract as a mediator, using a mutant strain of S.cervassia (Scm) unable to reduce oxygen (O2). We also have shown for the first time, the exoeclectrogenic capabilities of the industrially important ascomycete, Pichea pastoris. Electroactive fungi have important implications for energy harvesting, bioremediation, biotechnology and microbial ecology. Evaluation of other species and mechanisms of electron transfer are in progress to optimize such processes and to understand the contributions of electroactive fungi to global energy cycling.
Project
The DEEP project is exploring the diversity, interactions and electromicrobiology of anaerobic Fungal-Prokaryote-Viral (FPV) communities in the Deep Biosphere (DB).
Archived project
Establishment and modelling of multi-member microbial DIET & syntrophy.