Olupemi Oludare

Olupemi Oludare
University of Lagos | Unilag · Department of Creative Arts

Ph.D. Music

About

18
Publications
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Introduction
Olupemi Oludare lectures at the department of creative arts, University of Lagos. He specializes in the areas of theory and analysis and African musicology, with research interests in rhythm, language, movement, and cognition. He is currently on a postdoc research at the linguistics department, Utrecht University.
Additional affiliations
January 2022 - present
African Studies Centre
Position
  • Associate member
February 2020 - present
Utrecht University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Dùndún drum language is a practice of speech surrogacy employed by dùndún drummers in Yoruba culture. The dùndún drummers play sequences of melo-rhythmic patterns; a form of communication that employs musical and linguistic elements, comprehensible to listeners knowledgeable in the Yoruba language. Although these sequenced patterns are sourced from...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores the interdependence between organology and phonology in the Yoruba dùndún and bàtá drums. We analyze how the specific features of these drums, such as corpus shape, size, kind and number of membranes, and playing techniques affect their systems of speech surrogacy. The study relies on field recordings collected by the authors in...
Chapter
Indigenous knowledge reflects the traditional methods unique to a society. The Yoruba people are known for their exuberant cultural heritage, passed down aurally and orally through generations. This is achieved by an indigenous knowledge system, which also fosters their socio-cultural identity. Amongst such system is the Yoruba instrumental ensembl...
Chapter
The traditional institution of musical training of the Yoruba master instrumentalists was also examined in comparison with contemporary systems, highlighting their relevance and importance in Yoruba musical and socio-cultural milieu. One of the major musical leadership roles of the Yoruba master instruments is that they introduce the melodic and rh...
Article
Full-text available
The Yoruba people are blessed with a rich musical culture, with their traditional music engaging various arts and exhibiting their musical and extra-musical identities. Domiciled in South-western part of Nigeria, the Yoruba often express their socio-cultural way of life through music. This is epitomized in Yoruba traditional music in which the musi...
Article
Full-text available
Yoruba traditional instruments serve various musical and cultural functions, with the important roles of musical instruments juxtaposed with the significance of the family in the society. Hence, these instruments are given nomenclatures analogous to the parent-children and masculine-feminine designations, according to their musical functions. These...
Article
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This study examines the rhythmic structure of Sakara music by tracing its roots and analyzing the various rhythmic patterns employed as a compositional and aesthetic performance practice in this neo-traditional genre. While scholarly literature abounds generally on African rhythm, particularly in Yoruba music, little has been documented on theories...
Article
Full-text available
This paper discusses the thematic structure of Yoruba popular music of Southwest Nigeria. It examines the use of themes and variations in early and contemporary Juju music. The work is an outcome of a research developed by the author in his doctoral studies at the University of Lagos, Nigeria, with the aim of analyzing the thematic and motivic deve...
Article
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Abstract The role of music and musical arts education in African society traverse both socio-cultural and didactic functions; serving as social interaction, economic empowerment, political commentary, cultural indicator, historical preservation and educational tool. In Nigeria, while music function in the context of the people’s sacred beliefs and...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT This paper examines the compositional structure of Apala music, a Yoruba neo-traditional genre, with a focus on Yoruba popular musicians as creative artistes. It deliberates on the issue of musical techniques such as speech melody, speech rhythm, scale, phonemic tones, theme and motivic development, call and response form, etc., as composi...
Article
Full-text available
Music is an artistic sonic expression engaged in all human societies. In Africa societies, a musical style is a function of the people's linguistic attributes. While the 'Konkolo' pattern is a universal musical style, equally called 'Son', 'Tresillo' and 'Rumba' in other musical cultures, nonetheless it is an onomatopoeic sonic derivative of Yoruba...
Article
Full-text available
The Yoruba social and musical structures may be defined along the gender lines of masculinity and femininity. Despite the Yoruba culture reflecting a patriarchal system, yet the feminine figure and imagery is also sacrosanct, exemplified in the matriarchal reverence of the mother symbolism in Yoruba religious, socio-political and family traditions....
Article
Full-text available
The 'Konkonkolo' rhythm, while being a common pattern in Africa, is however an onomatopoeic sonic derivative of the percussive rhythm ubiquitous in Yoruba music. As a universal pattern, it is also employed in other world music, referred to as clave, standard pattern, and timeline. This paper examines this rhythm in its varied stroke patterns in Sak...
Article
Full-text available
Apàlà is an Islam-influenced genre indigenous to the Yoruba people in Nigeria. Although indigenous music among the Yoruba function in the realm of their religious and secular context, yet it aids in preserving their musical cultures, as the musicians are regarded as custodians of history. This study thus focuses on the preservation of Àpàlà musical...
Chapter
While Nigerian musician Chief Commander Ebenezer Obey did not create the juju style of music, he has nonetheless been a seminal force in reinventing what has come to be known as Nigeria's national sound. Taking the reins from juju master I. K. Dairo, Obey further modernized the music with his miliki (pleasure or enjoyment) style, adding several "ta...
Article
Full-text available
The Agidigbo is a major melo-rhythmic instrument of the Apala music, used by Yoruba musicians to achieve speech surrogate due to the tonal inflection of the Yoruba language. While it is somewhat easier in Yoruba vocal music to employ the three phonemic tones-low, mid and high for word intelligibility, the musicians must however adapt these tones in...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
The project attempts to bring together aspects of the distinct areas of knowledge of rhythm, language, and cognition, by seeking to understand the role and generative features of the kónkóló timeline's rhythmic structure in Yoruba traditional music. These include how the konkolo rhythm generates musical, language, dance, and cultural semantics. It also explores the implied affective aspects and therapeutic benefits of the auditory (kónkóló) rhythmic input in the performers' output.
Project
A project on “When Language has a Beat”, which investigates drum language in Africa. It focuses on the drum language in use in Africa, with a focus on the West African region were this musical language is prevalent. It investigates how the drum language is formed, how it relates to the linguistic (rhythm, phonology, semantics, etc.) features of spoken language, and how the drum texts are imbedded in musical contexts. It explores the interdependence between organology and phonology in the talking drums, by analyzing how the specific features of the drums and playing techniques are used to form single systems of speech surrogacy, and its linguistic relationship with the spoken language. We thank the Dutch Research Council (NWO - 360-89-060), for the financial support.
Project
Performance practices of African instruments. Musical Training and Indigenous Knowledge System