Olli-Pekka Tikkanen

Olli-Pekka Tikkanen
University of Eastern Finland | UEF · School of Forest Sciences

PhD

About

56
Publications
12,287
Reads
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1,577
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2014 - present
University of Eastern Finland
Position
  • Lecturer
December 2013 - September 2014
Finnish Forest Research Institute
Position
  • Senior Researcher
January 2011 - July 2011
University of Eastern Finland
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (56)
Article
Full-text available
Climate change has assisted the northward range expansion of various forest insect pests, increasing the risk of forest damage in Northern Europe. The pine beauty moth, Panolis flammea, is common in European pine stands with cyclical outbreaks that have damaged thousands of hectares. In the 1970s, its Finnish northern distribution limit was reporte...
Article
Full-text available
Primary forests, defined here as forests where the signs of human impacts, if any, are strongly blurred due to decades without forest management, are scarce in Europe and continue to disappear. Despite these losses, we know little about where these forests occur. Here, we present a comprehensive geodatabase and map of Europe’s known primary forests...
Article
Full-text available
The European spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus) has become a major forest pest in Finland in recent years. The beetle is a well-known vector of mainly ophiostomatoid fungi causing blue-stain of timber and pathogens that have the ability to amplify the insect damage. It also vectors other associated organisms, such as phoretic mites. The ecology o...
Article
The ability of plants to tolerate freezing limits their geographical distribution. Therefore, winter warming may shift a species’ occurrence northwards and/or to higher altitudes. In Europe, the hemiparasitic vascular plant Viscum album (mistletoe) has two common and widespread subspecies: V. a. ssp. album and V. a. ssp. austriacum. The former has...
Article
Full-text available
Primary forests are critical for forest biodiversity and provide key ecosystem services. In Europe, these forests are particularly scarce and it is unclear whether they are sufficiently protected. Here we aim to: (a) understand whether extant primary forests are representative of the range of naturally occurring forest types, (b) identify forest ty...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change induces multiple abiotic and biotic risks to forests and forestry. Risks in different spatial and temporal scales must be considered to ensure preconditions for sustainable multifunctional management of forests for different ecosystem services. For this purpose, the present review article summarizes the most recent findings on major...
Article
Full-text available
• As the development of the eight‐toothed spruce bark beetle Ips typographus is temperature‐dependent, climate change may encourage development of its additional generations per year and facilitate mass outbreaks further north than previously known. • The aim of the study was to analyse historical changes in effective temperature sums (ETSs) and ea...
Article
Full-text available
Tutkimusseloste Silva Fennican alkuperäisartikkelista. Tässä kuvataan kotimaan kielellä havununnan elinkaari ja merkitys metsätuholaisena (pääpiirteittäin) sekä vuoden 2019 seurannan menetelmät ja tulokset.
Article
Full-text available
Forests are affected by climate change in various ways. This includes abiotic factors such as droughts, but also biotic damage by pest insects. There are numerous examples from cases where pest insects have benefitted from longer growing seasons or from warmer summers. Similarly, new pest insects have been able to expand their range due to climatic...
Article
The northern regions are warming more rapidly than the global mean. This may cause problems in boreal forests if pest insects expand their ranges north. In Finland, the Nun moth (Lymantria monacha (Linnaeus)) is a potential forest defoliator that has earlier occurred sparsely along the southern coast of the country, but that might become a signific...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Primary forests have high conservation value but are rare in Europe due to historic land use. Yet many primary forest patches remain unmapped, and it is unclear to what extent they are effectively protected. Our aim was to (1) compile the most comprehensive European‐scale map of currently known primary forests, (2) analyse the spatial determina...
Article
Stump harvesting can help in managing forest pests, improve site preparation, and provide a source of bioenergy. However, stump removal does not remove all the roots from clear-cut areas. To investigate whether stump removal helps to manage forest pests, the effect of stump removal and its timing on the breeding and larval feeding activities of pin...
Article
1. It has been predicted that temperature increases of 3.6–5.8 °C would shift the northern distribution limit of Lymantria monacha (Linnaeus) and Lymantria dispar (Linnaeus) by 500–700 km, but these predictions ignore the effects of minimum winter temperatures. It was hypothesised that winter cold can limit range expansion due to high egg mortality...
Article
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Information concerning the speed of recovery in forest ecosystems is critical when seeking to determine the length of sustainable logging rotations, or for the evaluation of different forest restoration options for species conservation programs. Different functional groups may have specific roles within the ecosystem processes and costly conservati...
Article
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Species climate change vulnerability, their predisposition to be adversely affected, has been assessed for a limited portion of biodiversity. Our knowledge of climate change impacts is often based only on exposure, the magnitude of climatic variation in the area occupied by the species, even if species sensitivity, the species ability to tolerate c...
Article
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Intensive forest management and landscape degradation are threats to amphibian populations. We modelled and compared the extinction and colonization dynamics of the great crested newt in four different spatial contexts that describe landscape change from past to present and future forest landscapes in eastern Finland. In future landscape scenarios,...
Article
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Regeneration of natural forest structures and dead wood has a key role in the long-term maintenance of biodiversity in most parts of the boreal zone. In order to obtain benchmarks for practical dead wood management rapidly, we utilised unintended historical experiments in land use by studying the recovery of forests surrounding abandoned villages a...
Article
The present research examines the joint effects of climate change and management on the dead wood dynamics of the main tree species of the Finnish boreal forests via a forest ecosystem simulator. Tree processes are analyzed in stands subject to multiple biotic and abiotic environmental factors. A special focus is on the implications for biodiversit...
Article
Full-text available
The adaptation of different species to warming temperatures has been increasingly studied. Moose (Alces alces) is the largest of the ungulate species occupying the northern latitudes across the globe, and in Finland it is the most important game species. It is very well adapted to severe cold temperatures, but has a relatively low tolerance to warm...
Article
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Many amphibian species spend part of their life cycle in terrestrial habitats. However, their exact requirements regarding terrestrial habitats have often remained enigmatic. We aimed to compare the terrestrial habitat use of a common (smooth newt) and a rare newt (great crested newt) species around their breeding ponds, to see whether habitat pref...
Article
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The traditional way of living has affected forest landscapes surrounding the villages. We analyzed forest structure of old landscapes using satellite images and forestry maps, in the Kostomuksha region, in the western White Sea Karelia. The signs of past agricultural communities were still clearly visible in the forests surrounding the old villages...
Article
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The information about location and size of past human settlements can give new insights into the analysis of landscape structures. Vodlozero National Park (NP) is one the largest strictly protected areas in Northwestern Europe. We mapped the location of historic villages, which were abandoned in 1958, and studied the effect of past human activity i...
Article
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Amphibian declines have been reported worldwide during the last decades. In this study, we focused on the endangered great crested newt (Triturus cristatus), which has suffered from intensive forestry and past mire ditching in the northern verge of its distribution. We collected data from 46 breeding ponds in eastern Finland during 2005-2011 using...
Article
Maintenance of biodiversity in commercial forests has become a main goal in forestry, and several new management principles to reach that goal have been introduced lately. For example, in even-aged forestry, tree retention (leaving a proportion of trees standing in clear-cut sites) is widely used to increase the structural diversity and the amount...
Article
Setting aside parcels of land is the main conservation strategy to reduce the rate of biodiversity loss worldwide. Because funding for biological conservation is limited, it is important to distinguish the most efficient ways to use it. Here, we assess implications of alternative measures to conserve biodiversity in managed boreal forest landscapes...
Article
Aim Species–area relationships are often applied, but not generally approved, to guide practical conservation planning. The specific species group analysed may affect their applicability. We asked if species–area curves constructed from extensive databases of various sectors of natural resource administration can provide insights into large-scale c...
Article
The first known outbreak of Operopthera brumata in the subcontinental boreal zone was found in 1994. In the summer of 1995 use of the host plants by O. brumata was studied during the outbreak. Eight transects were studied from outbreak epicentres to the undefoliated perimeter. Along the transects the defoliation level of each tree and shrub species...
Article
Understanding of how a large landscape or network of conservation areas and habitats of red-listed species change in time is an important topic when addressing the temporal interplay between protected areas and matrix. We developed models of habitat suitability indices (HSI) for saproxylic red-listed invertebrate and fungal species, accounting for...
Article
Full-text available
Vole feeding amongst herbal willows that have a high concentration of salicylates in their bark and leaves, and may therefore be cultivated for use as raw material for herbal medicine was tested in the field and in laboratory conditions. Eight clones of dark-leaved willow (Salix myrsinifolia Salisb.) were cultivated for two years with six different...
Article
Eight Dark-leaved willow (Salix myrsinifolia) clones and two naturally hybridised clones (S.myrsinifolia×S.phylicifolia), that are considered to be suitable for herbal production, were cultivated for 2years in Luikonlahti and Punkaharju. Both experimental sites are located in eastern Finland and the distance between the sites is 140km. Different cu...
Article
Full-text available
Using data from expert assessments, we classified the habitat and resource requirements of red-listed boreal forest species in Finland. All major taxa were included and repre- sented by 466 species. Of the four major groups studied, red-listed Plantae & Fungi and Aphyllophorales were mainly inhabitants of shady coniferous forests, whereas the habit...
Article
The majority of studies demonstrating local adaptation of insect herbivores involve sessile species, particularly those with a parthenogentic phase to their life history or endophagous “parasites” of plants. Current arguments suggest the strength of selection determines whether local adaptation can or cannot take place. Therefore local adaptation s...
Article
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Phenological synchrony between budburst and emergence of larvae is critical for the fitness of many spring-feeding insect herbivores. Therefore, large intraspecific variation in timing of budburst of the host may have a negative effect on the herbivore. We studied how asynchrony between emergence of larvae and budburst affects the fitness of Operop...
Article
Plants are assumed to have a trade-off between growth and resistance. This trade-off has been demonstrated in herbaceous plants, but the information on woody plants is conflicting. In contrast to simple annual plant–herbivore systems, trees face highly variable herbivory. In this note, we measured clonal variation in the growth of Betula pendula an...
Article
Full-text available
The adaptation of three allopatric populations of a generalist moth, Operophtera brumata (L.), on two tree species, Prunus padus (L.) and Quercus robur (L.) which represent the extremes of the timing of budburst in spring, was studied in Finland and Sweden. The synchrony of the hatching and budbursting was monitored, and its importance to dispersal...
Article
Full-text available
The food selection, growth, and fecundity of insect herbivores are largely dictated by the chemical composition and nutritive values of plant foliage. We studied the host-use efficiency of larvae of the generalist moth, Operophtera brumata (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) on three chemically divergent but nutritively similar willows (Salix spp.). The 4th...
Article
During the mid 1990s, Operophterabrumata outbreaks were reported from different locations in eastern Fennoscandia. In this paper, we analysed the outbreak history of 13 separate 24–47-year-old stands of Prunuspadus, the main host of this herbivore in eastern Fennoscandia, based on width of annual growth rings. The stands were located on both sides...
Article
A generalist feeding strategy is common among eruptive insect herbivores but the ultimate reasons for a generalist strategy are not clear. Although generalist insect herbivores are able to complete their life cycle on several species of host plants, there is wide variation in the performance of individuals grown on different hosts. We examined whet...
Article
We studied the distribution and abundance of larvae of a highly polyphagous spring-feeding moth, Operophtera brumata (L.), by censusing 16 species of trees and shrubs in a mixed deciduous forest in southeastern Fennoscandia. The survival of 1st instars and the relative growth rate of last instars on potential host plants were studied in the laborat...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Our main purpose is to deliver needed information on how to adapt to climate warming in the forestry sector, keeping its sustainable management. We will also support the Finnish goal of carbon neutrality by 2035, and contributing to the sustainable development goal “Protect, restore, and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss.” (Goal 15: Life on land). Specifically, we will indicate regions of higher risk for the presence of outbreaking forest insects, bark beetle (Ips typographus) and moths (Lymantria monacha and Panolis flammea) due to climate warming. Those areas will probably need adaptations in their sustainable forest management plans and initially launch monitor plans for the studied insects. We will deliver the main results to decision and policymakers, so they could act and protect the Forest of Finland. It should be noted that the tools that we will develop will also be useful for projecting the distribution of other damaging forest insects in other countries of the Northern Hemisphere. Also, the information will be useful to develop more knowledge on the insect’s biology, useful for their management.
Project
Warming climate and more frequent storm damage have recently increased the risk of bark beetle damage on spruce in Finland. In this project, pheromone monitoring of Ips typographus is conducted annually in co-operation with the Finnish Forest Centre at about 40 sites in southern Finland. The aims of this project are (1) to assess the regional risks of spruce bark beetle damage and to analyze factors affecting it; (2) to increase the awareness of forest owners of risks caused by spruce bark beetles and to give timely information to forestry professionals and authorities about the risks and how to cope with them; (3) to evaluate bark beetle damage risks associated with forest restoration activities.