Olivier Gagey

Orthopedic Surgery, Surgery, Traumatology

MD, PhD, Professor and Head
37.60

Publications

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    ABSTRACT: This study analyzed baroreflex sensitivity, heart rate and systolic blood pressure variabilities during an oral 1 week administration of prednisone. This study examined the hypothesis that prednisone might change both systolic blood pressure level and baroreflex sensitivity. Twelve physically active male subjects participated to a double-blind, randomized cross-over study consisting of two 1-week periods of treatment separated by a 4-week drug-free washout period: placebo (PLA) or prednisone (PRED). Trials were performed by each subject four times on the second (D2) and seventh (D7) day of each treatment period. ECG and blood pressure were continuously recorded to compute heart rate variability, systolic blood pressure variability and baroreflex sensitivity components with the smoothed pseudo Wigner Ville distribution and baroreflex analysis. Following D2 prednisone treatment, both HR (PLA: 60.8 ± 10.5 vs. PRED: 65.8 ± 9.1 beats min −1 , p = 0.008) and low frequency component of systolic blood pressure variability (D2: 3.09 ± 0.19 vs. D7: 2.34 ± 0.19, p < 0.041) increased whereas other components did not change. Over 7 days of treatment, LF-SBP amplitude increased (D2: 2.71 ± 0.89 vs. D7: 3.87 ± 0.6 mmHg, p = 0.037). A slight increase in both HR and LF-SBPV were observed suggesting a potential sympathetic cardiovascular stimulus. Although we found a significant effect of the 1-week prednisone treatment on heart rate and low frequency power of systolic blood pressure variability, we reported neither an increase in the systolic blood pressure level nor a decrease in the baroreflex sensitivity. Therefore, the fragility of our results cannot support a deleterious effect of 1-week administration of prednisone on the autonomic cardiovascular control which might be involved in cardiovascular diseases.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · SpringerPlus
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    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique

  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: Improvement of motor performance in unilateral upper limb motor disability has been shown when utilizing inter-limb coupling strategies during physical rehabilitation. This suggests that 'default' bilateral central motor commands are facilitated. Here we tested whether this bilateral motor control principle may be generalized to the lower limbs during gait initiation, which involves alternate bilateral actions. Disability was simulated by strapping to produce ankle hypomobility. Healthy adult subjects initiated gait at a self-paced speed with no ankle constraint (control), or with the stance, swing or bilateral ankles strapped. The duration of the anticipatory postural adjustments lengthened and the center of mass instantaneous progression velocity at foot-off decreased when the ankle was strapped. During the step execution phase, progression velocity at foot-contact was higher when both ankles were strapped compared to unilateral strapping of the stance ankle. These findings suggest that bilateral central motor commands are favored during walking tasks. Indeed, unilateral constraint of the stance ankle should compel the central nervous system to adapt specific commands to the constraint and normal sides whereas the 'default' bilateral motor commands would be utilized when both ankles are strapped leading to better kinematics performance. Bilateral in-phase upper limb coordination and bilateral alternating lower limb locomotor movements may share similar control mechanisms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · Neuroscience Letters
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    ABSTRACT: Alterations of the scapular kinematics in different pathologic conditions have been widely studied. However, results have shown considerable discrepancies concerning the direction and the amplitude of scapular movement. The lack of consistency in the literature probably has several explanations. The purpose of this study was to analyze scapular orientation with the arm at rest and with 90° lateral elevation in healthy and pathologic subjects by use of stereoradiographs. All participants (n = 65) underwent a clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder to assess rotator cuff status. Participants were separated into 3 groups: healthy, rotator cuff tear (RCT), and RCT and subacromial impingement syndrome (RCT+ SIS). A 3-dimensional model of the scapula was fitted to each low-dose stereoradiograph acquired with the arm at rest and 90° arm elevation. Orientation of the scapula with the arm at rest was not significantly different between groups. During lateral elevation, scapular orientation was not significantly different between the healthy group and the RCT group. However, upward rotation was significantly reduced in the RCT + SIS group. Alterations of scapular kinematics in symptomatic subjects are multifactorial. We observed a link between clinically assessed subacromial impingement and scapular orientation during lateral elevation of the arm. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.]
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    ABSTRACT: Glucocorticoids are among the most commonly used drugs. They are widely administered for acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain, as well as for several other pain syndromes, although their therapeutic use is sometimes diverted for doping purposes. Their time-course effects on hormonal and inflammatory responses nevertheless remain poorly understood, both at rest and during exercise. We therefore studied the alterations induced by 1 week of prednisone treatment (60 mg daily) in recreationally trained male athletes after 2 days (i. e., acute) and 7 days (i. e., short-term). Hormonal (i. e., DHEA, DHEA-S, aldosterone, and testosterone) and pro- and anti-inflammatory markers (i. e., IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1β) were investigated at rest and after resistance exercise. A significant decrease in DHEA and DHEA-S (p<0.01) without change in the DHEA/DHEA-S ratio, aldosterone, or testosterone was demonstrated after acute prednisone intake. A significant increment in IL-10 and a significant decrement in IL-6 (p<0.05) were also observed with prednisone both at rest and during exercise, without significant change in IL-1β. Continued prednisone treatment led to another significant decrease in both DHEA and DHEA-S (p<0.05), whereas no change in the inflammatory markers was observed between days 2 and 7. Our data demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of prednisone were maximal and stable from the beginning of treatment, both in rest and exercise conditions. However, hormonal concentrations continued to decline during short-term intake. Further studies are needed to determine the effects of hormonal time-course alterations with longer glucocorticoid treatment and the clinical consequences. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Hormone and Metabolic Research
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    L D Duranthon · O J Gagey

    Full-text · Dataset · Jan 2015
  • J.-L. Rouvillain · D. Courcier · O. Gagey

    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · Revue de Chirurgie Orthopédique et Traumatologique
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    J-L Rouvillain · D Courcier · O Gagey

    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · Orthopaedics & Traumatology Surgery & Research
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    Conference Paper: The R-45 test
    Olivier Gagey

    Full-text · Conference Paper · Sep 2014
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    ABSTRACT: A robust and reproducible scapular coordinate system is necessary to study scapulo-thoracic kinematics. The coordinate system recommended by the ISB (International Society of Biomechanics) is difficult to apply in studies using medical imaging, which mostly use a glenoid-centered coordinate system. The aim of this study was to assess the robustness of a glenoid-centered coordinate system compared to the ISB coordinate system, and to study the reproducibility of this coordinate system measure during abduction. A Monte-Carlo analysis was performed to test the robustness of the two coordinate systems. This method enabled the variability of the orientation of the coordinate system to be assessed in laboratory setting. A reproducibility study of the glenoid-centered coordinate system in the thorax reference frame was performed during abduction in the scapular plane using a low-dose stereoradiography system. We showed that the glenoid-centered coordinate system was slightly more robust than the ISB-recommended coordinate system. Most reproducible rotation was upward/downward rotation (x axis) and most reproducible translation was along the Y axis (superior-inferior translation). In conclusion, the glenoid-centered coordinate system can be used with confidence for scapular kinematics analysis. The uncertainty of the measures derived from our technique is acceptable compared to that reported in the literature. Functional quantitative analysis of the scapular-thoracic joint is possible with this method.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2014 · Journal of applied biomechanics

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
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    ABSTRACT: All systemically administered glucocorticoids (GC) are prohibited in-competition, because of the potential ergogenic effects. Although short-term GC intake has been shown to improve performance during submaximal exercise, literature on its impact during brief intense exercise appears to be very scant. The purpose of this study was to examine the ergogenic and metabolic effects of prednisone during repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise. In a double-blind randomized protocol, ten recreational male athletes followed two 1-week treatments (Cor: prednisone, 60 mg/day or Pla: placebo). At the end of each treatment, they hopped on their dominant leg for 30 seconds three times consecutively and then hopped until exhaustion, with intervals of 5 min of passive recovery. Blood and saliva samples were collected at rest and 3 min after each exercise bout to determine the lactate, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, TNF-alpha, DHEA and testosterone values. The absolute peak force of the dominant leg was significantly increased by Cor but only during the first 30-second hopping bout (p<0.05), whereas time to exhaustion was not significantly changed after Cor treatment vs Pla (Pla: 119.9 ± 7.8; Cor: 123.1 ± 9.3 seconds). Cor intake lowered basal and end-exercise plasma interleukin-6 and saliva DHEA (p<0.01) and increased interleukin-10 (p<0.01), whereas no significant change was found in blood lactate and TNF-alpha or saliva testosterone between Pla and Cor. According to these data, short-term glucocorticoid intake did not improve endurance performance during repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise, despite the significant initial increase in absolute peak force and anti-inflammatory effect.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014 · Steroids
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    ABSTRACT: In humans, the hip joint occupies a central place in the locomotor system, as it plays an important role in body support and the transmission of the forces between the trunk and lower limbs. The study of the three-dimensional biomechanics of this joint has important implications for documenting the morphological changes associated with the acquisition of a habitual bipedal gait in humans. Functional integration at any joint has important implications in joint stability and performance. The aim of the study was to evaluate the functional integration at the human hip joint. Both the level of concordance between the three-dimensional axes of the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture, and patterns of covariation between these two axes were analysed. First, inter-individual variations were quantified and significant differences in the three-dimensional orientations of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck were detected. On a sample of 57 individuals, significant patterns of covariation were identified, however, the level of concordance between the axes of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture was lower than could be expected for a key joint such as the hip. Patterns of covariation were explored regarding the complex three-dimensional biomechanics of the full pelvic-femoral complex. Finally, we suggest that the lower degree of concordance observed at the human hip joint in a bipedal posture might be partly due to the phylogenetic history of the human species.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Journal of Human Evolution
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    ABSTRACT: Significant alteration in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function has been demonstrated in patients after short-term glucocorticoid therapy, but its impact on the circadian rhythm of steroid hormones has never been investigated. This study examined the effects of short-term prednisone administration on the diurnal patterns of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and testosterone. Saliva samples were collected from 11 healthy, physically active, male volunteers for DHEA and testosterone analysis, as follows: every 4 h from 0800 to 2000 h on 2 control days without medication, and after 1 week of oral therapeutic prednisone treatment (60 mg daily) (days 0-3). Overall, a diurnal decline in the two steroid hormones was observed on the control days. After short-term glucocorticoid administration, DHEA concentrations were significantly decreased with a complete disappearance of the DHEA diurnal pattern, which lasted 2 days post-treatment. No glucocorticoid effect was observed for testosterone. The results indicate that short-term prednisone treatment affects the circadian pattern of saliva DHEA but not testosterone in healthy active volunteers. Further studies are necessary to determine whether this alteration in DHEA circadian pattern has clinical consequences in patients with chronic glucocorticoid therapy.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · Endocrine
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    ABSTRACT: A recent review on the natural course of low back pain (LBP) in the general population indicated that the LBP reporting pattern is fairly constant over time. Furthermore, the LBP status at baseline (yes/no) seems to be predictive of the future course. When fluctuations occur, they seem most common between the nearest categories. However, in the majority of articles, non-responders were not taken into account in the analyses or interpretation of data, meaning that estimates may have been biased. Further, all reviewed studies included study participants of many different age groups. Data from three cross-sectional surveys over 8 years of the same cohort made it possible to answer the following questions: 1) Would the prevalence estimates of LBP be stable over time? 2) How would results change when taking into account non-responders? 3) Is the LBP reporting over the three survey periods stable at an individual level, taking into account also the non-responding group? Data from three subsequent cross-sectional surveys of a study sample were available and questions about LBP were asked at baseline and also 4 and 8 years later. Study participants were 40/41 years at base-line and initially randomly selected from the general Danish population. Data were analyzed with STATA/IC 12, and presented with percentages and 95% confidence intervals. The majority of participants reported to have had LBP in the preceding year but not having taken sick leave in relation to this pain. LBP was stable or relatively stable for the study participants as they progressed through their fifth decade. This was true on a population basis and also on an individual level. When non-responders were taken into account the results did not change. This study confirmed the results from our recent review; both presence and absence of LBP seem to be predictive for the future course. The percentage of non-responders in this type of study may not be as important as previously thought in relation to the presence/absence of LBP.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders

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