Olivier Broennimann

Olivier Broennimann
University of Lausanne | UNIL · Department of Ecology and Evolution

Dr.

About

143
Publications
76,469
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10,419
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2006 - present
January 2005 - December 2012
Université de Lausanne

Publications

Publications (143)
Article
Full-text available
To withstand the surge of species loss worldwide, (re)introduction of endangered plant species has become an increasingly common technique in conservation biology. Successful (re)introduction plans, however, require identifying sites that provide the optimal ecological conditions for the target species to thrive. In this study, we propose a two‐ste...
Article
Mountains are hotspots of biodiversity and ecosystem services, but they are warming about twice as fast as the global average. Climate change may reduce alpine snow cover and increase vegetation productivity, as in the Arctic. Here, we demonstrate that 77% of the European Alps above the tree line experienced greening (productivity gain) and <1% bro...
Preprint
Full-text available
Context Human-induced changes in landscape structure are among the main causes of biodiversity loss. However, despite their important contribution to biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, microbes – and particularly protists – remain spatially understudied. Furthermore, soil microbiota are most often related to the local soil properties, whereas...
Article
Full-text available
Although widely used in ecology, comparative analyses of diversity and niche properties are still lacking for microorganisms, especially focusing on niche variations. Quantifying the niches of microbial taxa is necessary to then forecast how taxa and the communities they compose might respond to environmental changes. In this study, we first identi...
Article
Full-text available
Aim The abundant centre hypothesis (ACH) predicts a negative relationship between species abundance and the distance to the geographical range centre. Since its formulation, empirical tests of the ACH have involved different settings (e.g. the distance to the ecological niche or to the geographical range centre), but studies found contrasting suppo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background The niche concept describes the range of conditions supporting the establishment and persistence of species in the environment. Although widely used in ecology, it has not been often applied to microbes, for which comparative niche analyses are still lacking. Yet, quantifying the niche of microbial taxa is necessary to forecast how taxa...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although widely used in ecology, comparative analyses of diversity and niche properties are still lacking for microorganisms, especially concerning niche variations. In this study, we identified important topoclimatic, edaphic, spatial and biotic drivers of the alpha and beta diversity of bacterial, archaeal, fungal and protist communities. Then, w...
Article
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Many species distribution models (SDMs) are built with precise but geographically restricted presence-absence datasets (e.g. a country) where only a subset of the environmental conditions experienced by a species across its range is considered (i.e. spatial niche truncation). This type of truncation is worrisome because it can lead to incorrect pre...
Article
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One key hypothesis explaining the fate of exotic species introductions posits that the establishment of a self-sustaining population in the invaded range can only succeed within conditions matching the native climatic niche. Yet, this hypothesis remains untested for individual release events. Using a dataset of 979 introductions of 173 mammal speci...
Article
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Aim: Niche-based species distribution models (SDMs) have become a ubiquitous tool in ecology and biogeography. These models relate species occurrences with the environmental conditions found at these sites. Climatic variables are the most commonly used environmental data and are usually included in SDMs as averages of a reference period (30–50 year...
Article
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Spatial autocorrelation (SAC) is a common feature of ecological data where observations tend to be more similar at some geographic distance(s) than expected by chance. Despite the implications of SAC for data dependencies, its impact on the performance of species distribution models (SDMs) remains controversial, with reports of both strong and negl...
Article
Aim: Mounting evidence suggests that failure of species distribution models to integrate local adaptation hinders our ability to predict distribution ranges, raising the question of whether modelling should be performed at the level of species (clade models) or intraspecific lineages (subclade models), characterized by the restricted availability o...
Article
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The extent to which species can balance out the loss of suitable habitats due to climate warming by shifting their ranges is an area of controversy. Here, we assess whether highly efficient wind-dispersed organisms like bryophytes can keep-up with projected shifts in their areas of suitable climate. Using a hybrid statistical-mechanistic approach a...
Article
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As anthropogenic degradation of biodiversity and ecosystems increases, so does the potential threat to the supply of ecosystem services, a key contribution of nature to people. Biodiversity has often been used in spatial conservation planning and has been regarded as one among multiple services delivered by ecosystems. Hence, biodiversity conservat...
Preprint
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Why do some alien species introductions fail while others are successful? One key hypothesis is that in order for a species to invade a new range, it must initially establish successfully in conditions within its native climatic niche (NCN). Yet, this hypothesis has largely remained untested at the level of individual release events. Using a datase...
Article
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Assessing the degree to which climate explains the spatial distributions of different taxonomic and functional groups is essential for anticipating the effects of climate change on ecosystems. Most effort so far has focused on aboveground organisms, which offer only a partial view on the response of biodiversity to environmental gradients. Here, in...
Article
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Biological invasions are a major driver of human-induced global environmental change. This makes monitoring of potential spread, population changes and control measures necessary for guiding management. We illustrate the value of integrated methods (species distribution modelling (SDM), plant population monitoring and questionnaires) for monitoring...
Article
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Underpinnings of the distribution of allopolyploid species (hybrids with duplicated genome) along spatial and ecological gradients are elusive. As allopolyploid speciation combines the range of genetic and ecological characteristics of divergent diploids, allopolyploids initially show their additivity and are predicted to evolve differentiated ecol...
Article
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A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between land cover, climate change, and disturbance dynamics is needed to inform scenarios of vegetation change on the African continent. Although significant advances have been made, large uncertainties exist in projections of future biodiversity and ecosystem change for the World’s largest tropica...
Data
DOIs of occurrence data used for the ecological niche modeling of Aegilops species
Preprint
Full-text available
Aim: To assess if and how species' range size relates to range structure, if the observed geographic range properties can be retrieved from predicted maps based on species distribution modeling, and whether range properties are predictable from biogeophysical factors. Location: Europe. Time period: Current. Major taxa studied: 813 vascular plant sp...
Article
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Aim: Domestic animals first appeared in the archaeological record in northern Africa c. 9000 years before present and subsequently spread southwards throughout the continent. This geographic expansion is well studied and can broadly be explained in terms of the movement of pastoralist populations due to climate change. However, no studies have expl...
Article
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Trends in spatial patterns of diversity in macroscopic organisms can be well predicted from correlative models, using topo‐climatic variables for plants and animals allowing inference over large scales. By contrast, diversity in soil microorganisms is generally considered as mostly driven by edaphic variables and, therefore, difficult to extrapolat...
Data
Supplement to: Phelps, Leanne N; Broennimann, Oliver; Manning, Katie; Timpson, Adrian; Jousse, Hélène; Mariethoz, Gregoire; Fordham, Damien A; Shanahan, Timothy M; Davis, Basil A S; Guisan, Antoine (accepted): Reconstructing climatic niche breadth of land use for animal production during the African Holocene. Global Ecology and Biogeography, https:...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aim: General trends in spatial patterns of macroscopic organisms diversity can be reasonably well predicted from correlative models, using for instance topo-climatic variables for plants and animals allowing inference over large scales. By contrast, soil microorganisms diversity is generally considered as mostly driven by edaphic variables and, the...
Article
Full-text available
Protected areas (PAs) play a critical role in conserving biodiversity and maintaining viable populations of threatened species. Yet, as global change could reduce the future effectiveness of existing PAs in covering high species richness, updating the boundaries of existing PAs or creating new ones might become necessary to uphold conservation goal...
Article
Aim Species distribution models (SDMs) based on habitat suitability and niche quantification are powerful tools in vegetation science. Recent findings suggest that they could be applied at the landscape scale as vegetation conservation tools, but that some environmental dimensions (e.g. climate) need to be considered at larger scales. Here, we high...
Chapter
Alien plant species have been essential for farming and agro-forestry systems and for their supply of food, fiber, tannins, resins or wood from antiquity to the present. They also contributed to supporting functions and regulating services (water, soil, biodiversity) and to the design of landscapes with high cultural and scenic value. Some of those...
Article
Full-text available
Aim The current volume of global trade has led to an unprecedented rate of biological invasions, causing severe problems to native ecosystems. The knowledge of species introduction routes and areas suitable for establishment is therefore an important step in preventing future invasions. The situation can be further exacerbated by climate change, wh...
Article
Climate change impact on species is commonly assessed by predicting species' range change, a measure of a species' extrinsic exposure. However, this is only one dimension of species' vulnerability to climate change. Spatial arrangement of suitable habitats (e.g., fragmentation), their degree of protection or human disturbance, as well as species' i...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive alien plants (IAP) are a threat to biodiversity worldwide. Understanding and anticipating invasions allow for more efficient management. In this regard, predicting potential invasion risks by IAPs is essential to support conservation planning into areas of high conservation value (AHCV) such as sites exhibiting exceptional botanical richne...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the mechanisms by which the abiotic and biotic requirements of species, or ecological niches, change over time is a central issue in evolutionary biology. Niche evolution is poorly understood at both the macroecological and macroevolutionary scales, as niches can shift over short periods of time but appear to change more slowly over l...
Article
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In the version of this Article originally published, in Fig. 3a the first boundary was incorrectly labelled the “K/T boundary”; it should have read the “K/Pg boundary”. The two equations in the main text were incorrectly omitted from the HTML. In the description of the posterior distribution of an ancestral state, the normal distribution was incorr...
Article
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Correlative species distribution models are based on the observed relationship between species’occurrence and macroclimate or other environmental variables. In climates predicted less favourable, populations are expected to decline, and in favourable climates they are expected to persist. However, little comparative empirical support exists for a r...
Article
Full-text available
Biological control using natural antagonists has been a most successful management tool against alien invasive plants that threaten biodiversity. The selection of candidate agents remains a critical step in a biocontrol program before more elaborate and time-consuming experiments are conducted. Here, we propose a biogeographic approach to identify...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of the ecospat package is to make available novel tools and methods to support spatial analyses and modeling of species niches and distributions in a coherent workflow. The package is written in the R language (R Development Core Team 2016) and contains several features, unique in their implementation, that are complementary to other existi...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive alien plants (IAP) are a threat to biodiversity worldwide. Understanding and anticipating invasions allow for more efficient management. In this regard, predicting potential invasion risks by IAPs is essential to support conservation planning into areas of high conservation value (AHCV) such as sites exhibiting exceptional botanical richne...