Oliver D. Smith

Oliver D. Smith

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16
Publications
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Introduction
Independent researcher. For a full list of my publications: https://oliveratlantis.com

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
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The story of Atlantis appears in Plato’s Timaeus-Critias (c. 355 BCE) as an oral tradition Solon acquired in Egypt and adapted into an epic poem, but which he left unfinished. Nevertheless, Solon told the story to his family relative Dropides, who passed it orally to his son (Critias the elder), who in turn told it to his grandson (Critias the youn...
Article
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In ancient Chinese literature there are several mentions of hairy humanlike beings, and eyewitness reports of the yeren ("wildman") in China have persisted into the modern era. Dozens of alleged sightings of the Chinese wildman in the forests of Shennongjia (northwestern Hubei) eventually prompted a large-scale expedition of scientists to investiga...
Article
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This paper provides a checklist of 35 hypotheses concerning the identity of the yeti – a hairy creature in Sherpa folklore, Tibetan literature, and cryptozoology. Most scientists dismiss the idea the yeti is an unidentified animal and instead suggest known animal misidentifications such as bears (e.g.,Ursus thibetanus thibetanus) to explain yeti st...
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Nearly all archaeologists identify the remains of Troy with Hisarlik. This article in contrast looks at some alternative suggested locations and finding them to be implausible suggests a Bronze Age site – Yenibademli Höyük – on the North Aegean Island Imbros (Gökçeada). The popular identification of Hisarlik with Troy is questioned and doubted. It...
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Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (6. 297-299).
Article
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Misanthropic anti-natalism argues it is unethical for humans to procreate because the human species inflicts an immense amount of pain and suffering (including painful death) on other humans, non-human animals and causes environmental degradation (such as pollution). This article tentatively estimates the number of insect deaths caused by humans wo...
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This paper rejects the idea the legendary character Santa Claus traces back to Saint Nicholas and instead proposes a more recent historical figure-Walter Clement Shields (1884-1918) who organised reindeer fairs in Seward Peninsula, Alaska between 1915 and 1918. Shields died of an influenza epidemic in 1918 but was by venerated by indigenous inhabit...
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The following note looks at Robert Graves's casual writings about Atlantis, 1953-1967, foregrounding areas of difference with classical scholars and suggesting sources of influence.
Article
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Plato in his dialogue Critias (c. 355 BCE) wrote about an imaginary king named Atlas and an island civilisation (Atlantis) which derived its name from him. This article argues Plato based his king Atlas on a mythical Arcadian king of the same name and his main inspiration for Atlantis was the town Methydrium and nearby city Megalopolis, both in Arc...
Article
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Solon is widely thought by classicists to have once travelled to Egypt during his lifetime; this paper in contrast denies Solon set foot in Egypt based on issues with Herodotean chronology as well as puts forward a new argument: Egypto-Greek contact during Solon's lifetime was limited to commerce mostly by Greek merchants from Asia Minor (such as I...
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In the 1960s and early 1970s it was fashionable among academics to identify Atlantis with Minoan Crete or Thera (Santorini) in the Aegean Sea. This Minoan hypothesis or Thera-Cretan theory was proposed in 1909 but did not attract much attention until it was popularised by three books in 1969. However, the hypothesis was criticised and arguably refu...
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The Iliad describes Poseidon's view of Troy from Samothrace, atop the highest mountain on the island. It is argued from this view, the city of Troy couldn't have been Hisarlik. Instead, an alternative location for Troy is suggested, about 45 miles northwest of Hisarlik on the island Imbros (Gökçeada), further identifying the Trojan citadel (Ilios)...
Article
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The Pillars of Heracles were columns ancient Greeks regarded as marking the boundaries of the furthest west. In Greek mythology, Heracles laid down the columns when sailing to the island Erytheia at the edge of the world. It is argued the original columns were located during the time of Homer (late 8th century BCE) and Hesiod (c. 700 BCE) at Epirus...
Conference Paper
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In 1982 Myra Shackley published "The Case for Neanderthal Survival: Fact, Fiction or Fraction?" in the journal Antiquity, followed by a book the next year Still Living? Yeti, Sasquatch and the Neanderthal Enigma. While focusing on recent alleged sightings of the almas (a hairy human-like creature) across Central Asia as a possible relict population...
Article
Full-text available
The ancient Greeks had a myth about five successional kinds (ages) of mankind: gold, silver, bronze, heroic and iron. While most classicists accept the last three kinds have some basis in historical truth (interpreting them as the archaeological sequence of bronze and iron metalworking), the silver or gold kinds are instead treated as metaphorical...
Thesis
The author analyses the Atlantis story (Plato's Timaeus-Critias) and argues it is an authentic oral tradition that was passed from Solon to the family of Dropides, before eventually reaching Plato. The story was garbled via oral transmission (retelling a story by word of mouth is unreliable) and therefore semi-fictionalized, but probably contains a...