Oliver Moore

Oliver Moore
University of Leeds · Earth Surface Science Institute (ESSI)

PhD Geochemistry

About

14
Publications
2,170
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
181
Citations

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
Minerals are widely proposed to protect organic carbon from degradation and thus promote the persistence of organic carbon in soils and sediments, yet a direct link between mineral adsorption and retardation of microbial remineralisation is often presumed and a mechanistic understanding of the protective preservation hypothesis is lacking. We find...
Article
Full-text available
The coprecipitation of organic carbon with iron minerals is important for its preservation in soils and sediments, but the mechanisms for carbon-iron interactions and thus the controls on organic carbon cycling are far from understood. Here we coprecipitate carboxylic acids with iron (oxyhydr)oxide ferrihydrite and use near-edge X-ray absorption fi...
Article
Full-text available
Association of organic carbon (OC) with reactive iron (FeR) represents an important mechanism by which OC is protected against remineralisation in soils and marine sediments. Recent studies indicate that the molecular structure of organic compounds and/or the identity of associated FeR phases exert a control on the ability of an OC–FeR complex to b...
Preprint
Full-text available
Association of organic carbon (OC) with reactive iron (FeR) represents an important mechanism by which OC is protected against remineralisation in soils and marine sediments. Recent studies indicate that the molecular structure of organic compounds and/or the identity of associated FeR phases exerts a control on the ability of an OC-FeR complex to...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Earth's critical zone (CZ) has been constantly evolving and changing over geological timescales, historically driven by tectonic and climatic forcings. Recently CZ changes have also been driven by anthropogenic factors occasioned by increases in population, which has increased demand for resources and expansion of agriculture, leading to unsust...
Article
The majority of organic carbon (OC) burial in marine sediments occurs on continental shelves, of which an estimated 10–20% is associated with reactive iron (FeR). The association of OC with FeR (OC-FeR) is thought to facilitate preservation of organic matter (OM) in sediments and therefore represents an important carbon sink. The citrate-bicarbonat...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Drawdown of atmospheric CO2 over geologic timescales is largely controlled by imbalances in the carbonate-silicate cycles and the preservation of Organic Carbon (OC) in marine sediments. Up to 85% of this OC is buried in continental shelf sediments of which ~20% is associated with reactive iron (Fe) (hydr)oxides. Association with Fe (hydr)oxides ma...
Article
Granitic weathering profiles display highly diverse morphologies, reflecting the complex relationships between climate and weathering rates. Some profiles exhibit abrupt transitions from fresh bedrock to highly weathered material over short (<1 m) distances, while others exhibit only limited weathering extending 10s of meters into the bedrock. Alth...
Article
Full-text available
The analysis of reference materials is a fundamental part of the data analysis process, in particular for XAS experiments. The beamline users and more generally the XAS community can greatly benefit from the availability of a reliable and wide base of reference sample spectra, acquired in standard and well-characterized experimental conditions. On...
Article
Full-text available
Soils are crucial in regulating ecosystem processes, such as nutrient cycling, and supporting plant growth. To a large extent, these functions are carried out by highly diverse and dynamic soil microbiomes that are in turn governed by numerous environmental factors including weathering profile and vegetation. In this study, we investigate geophysic...
Article
The processes that control chemical weathering of bedrock in the deep critical zone at a mm-scale are still poorly understood, but may produce 100 s of meters of regolith and substantial fluxes of silicate weathering products and thus may be important for modeling long-term, global CO 2 . Weathering controls are also difficult to ascertain, as labo...
Article
Full-text available
Soil degradation, including rocky desertification, of the karst regions in China is severe. Karst landscapes are especially sensitive to soil degradation as carbonate rocks are nutrient-poor and easily eroded. Understanding the balance between soil formation and soil erosion is critical for long-term soil sustainability, yet little is known about t...
Article
In order to assess the effects of critical zone processes on Mg concentrations and isotopic signatures of tropical streams, we studied a well constrained, highly weathered andesitic volcaniclastic catchment in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico. Our results indicate that dissolved Mg concentrations and isotope ratios in the regolit...
Article
Lithologic differences give rise to the differential weatherability of the Earth’s surface and globally variable silicate weathering fluxes, which provide an important negative feedback on climate over geologic timescales. To isolate the influence of lithology on weathering rates and mechanisms, we compare two nearby catchments in the Luquillo Crit...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The oceanic carbon cycle is fundamentally important for regulating the Earth system because, in sediments and seawater, the balance between the degradation and preservation of organic carbon (OC) exerts a first order control on atmospheric CO2 and O2. These gases have mediated global climate, planetary oxidation and Earth’s habitability through geologic time, while increasing CO2 levels now present a major climate threat. In sediments, OC is preserved over millions of years, while in seawater, a dissolved form of recalcitrant OC has been recently recognised as critical to OC storage over anthropogenic timescales. Both sedimentary and seawater OC are derived from living organisms, and should therefore be easily degraded. Their persistence in the oceans is therefore one of the most enduring paradoxes in marine biogeochemistry. MINORG will quantify the role of minerals in the preservation of OC for the first time, by combining cutting-edge molecular-level techniques with the first ever comprehensive and fully integrated experimental and modelling campaign, to determine in unprecedented detail the exact mechanisms responsible for the interaction of OC with minerals, and its subsequent degradation and preservation behaviour. This project will make a major contribution to our quantitative understanding of the oceanic carbon cycle, and so to predicting and mitigating current and future climate change.