Oliver Patrick Höner

Oliver Patrick Höner
Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research · Department of Evolutionary Ecology

Dr. phil. nat.

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36
Publications
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921
Citations

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal has a significant impact on lifetime reproductive success, and is often more prevalent in one sex than the other. In group-living mammals, dispersal is normally male-biased and in theory this sexual bias could be a response by males to female mate preferences, competition for access to females or resources, or the result of males avoiding...
Article
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Life history theory predicts that mothers should provide their offspring with a privileged upbringing if this enhances their offspring's and their own fitness. In many mammals, high-ranking mothers provide their offspring with a privileged upbringing. Whether dispersing sons gain fitness benefits during adulthood from such privileges (a 'silver spo...
Article
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Dispersal is a key driver of ecological and evolutionary processes. Despite substantial efforts to explain the evolution of dispersal, we still do not fully understand why individuals of the same sex of a species vary in their propensity to disperse. The dominant hypothesis emphasizes movements and assumes that leaving home (dispersal) and staying...
Article
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Identifying how dominance within and between the sexes is established is pivotal to understanding sexual selection and sexual conflict. In many species, members of one sex dominate those of the other in one-on-one interactions. Whether this results from a disparity in intrinsic attributes, such as strength and aggressiveness, or in extrinsic factor...
Article
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1. In many animal societies, dominant males have a higher reproductive success than subordinate males. The proximate mechanisms by which social rank influences reproductive success are poorly understood. One prominent hypothesis posits that rank‐related male attributes of attractiveness and fighting ability are the main mediators of reproductive sk...
Article
The rate of adaptive evolution, the contribution of selection to genetic changes that increase mean fitness, is determined by the additive genetic variance in individual relative fitness. To date, there are few robust estimates of this parameter for natural populations, and it is therefore unclear whether adaptive evolution can play a meaningful ro...
Article
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Management strategies to reduce human-carnivore conflict are most effective when accepted by local communities. Previous studies have suggested that the acceptance depends on emotions toward carnivores, the cultural importance of carnivores, and livestock depredation, and that it may vary depending on the types of strategies and carnivores involved...
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Individuals of many species rely on odors to communicate, find breeding partners, locate resources and sense dangers. In vertebrates, odorants are detected by chemosensory receptors of the olfactory system. One class of these receptors, the trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs), was recently suggested to mediate male sexual interest and mate cho...
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Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play a pivotal role in vertebrate self/nonself recognition, parasite resistance and life history decisions. In evolutionary terms, the MHC’s exceptional diversity is likely maintained by sexual and pathogen-driven selection. Even though MHC-dependent mating preferences have been confirmed for many specie...
Article
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1.Enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) are widely used to quantify concentrations of hormone metabolites. Modifications in laboratory conditions may affect the accuracy of metabolite concentration measurements and lead to misinterpretations when results of different accuracy are combined for a statistical analysis. This issue is of great relevance to studies...
Article
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Spotted hyenas live in social groups of up to 100 members. In these complex societies, a strikingly simple behavioural pattern has evolved that efficiently prevents inbreeding: females are very picky when it comes to choosing a father for their young and as a result, most sexually mature males disperse from the group. The results of pioneering stud...
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Ein evolutionäres Verhaltensmuster verhindert Inzucht in sozialen Tiergemeinschaften: Weil weibliche Tüpfelhyänen so wählerisch sind, wandern die fortpflanzungsreifen Männchen aus. Ergebnisse wegweisender Studien im Ngorongoro-Krater in Tansania.
Article
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The diet of free-ranging carnivores is an important part of their ecology. It is often determined from prey remains in scats. In many cases, scat analyses are the most efficient method but they require correction for potential biases. When the diet is expressed as proportions of consumed mass of each prey species, the consumed prey mass to excrete...
Data
Guidelines for feeding experiments to ensure the experiments simulate as closely as possible natural feeding situations. (DOC)
Data
Determination of correction factors 1 (CF1) and 2 (CF2) from four published feeding experiments with the new method. We used the studies on wolves from North America [8], Europe [9] and India [7] and Eurasian lynx from Europe [16]. For each study we present in a table the published data and our calculations to derive CF1 and CF2, and the figures wi...
Data
Correction factor 2 (CF2) described as exponential function from our data set in table 1. Mean number of collectable scats excreted per cheetah and prey animal (Q4) as a function of mean prey body mass (kg) provided per feeding experiment (Q1). CF2 follows the exponential function y = 2.654(1-exp(−0.960x)), R2 = 0.705, P<0.05, n = 14. For details a...
Data
Application of correction factors 1 (CF1) and 2 (CF2) to four published studies on carnivore diet following the new method. We applied CF1 and CF2 derived from our feeding experiments with cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) to a cheetah study in Namibia [2], and a tiger (Panthera tigris) and leopard (P. pardus) study in India [13], and CF1 and CF2 derived...
Article
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1. The long-term ecological impact of pathogens on group-living, large mammal populations is largely unknown. We evaluated the impact of a pathogenic bacterium, Streptococcus equi ruminatorum, and other key ecological factors on the dynamics of the spotted hyena Crocuta crocuta population in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania. 2. We compared key demog...
Article
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Host defense peptides act on the forefront of innate immunity, thus playing a central role in the survival of animals and plants. Despite vast morphological changes in species through evolutionary history, all animals examined to date share common features in their innate immune defense strategies, hereunder expression of host defense peptides (HDP...
Article
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Social status is an important phenotypic trait that determines fitness-relevant parameters. In many mammalian societies, offspring acquire a social position at adulthood similar to that held by their mother (“rank inheritance”) and thus obtain fitness benefits associated with this status. Mothers may influence the rank of their offspring at adultho...
Article
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Replying to: R. C. Van Horn, H. E. Watts & K. E. Holekamp 454, 10.1038/nature07122 (2008)We demonstrated that female mate-choice, rather than male inbreeding avoidance, resources or male-male competition, drives male-biased dispersal in spotted hyaenas (Crocuta crocuta). We further showed that females use two simple rules based on male tenure to ch...
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Thirteen strains of Streptococcus equi subsp. ruminatorum from free-ranging spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) and plains zebras (Equus burchelli) in Tanzania were characterized by biochemical and molecular-biological methods. Although the colony appearance of the S.e. ruminatorum wildlife strains differed from that of the S.e. ruminatorum type strai...
Article
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In a population of spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) monitored between 1996 and 2005 in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, 16 individuals from five of eight social groups displayed clinical signs of an infection, including severe unilateral swelling of the head followed by abscess formation at the mandibular angle, respiratory distress, mild ataxia, a...
Article
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We used naturally occurring spatial and temporal changes in prey abundance to investigate whether the foraging behavior of a social, territorial carnivore, the spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta), conformed to predictions derived from the ideal free distribution. We demonstrate that hyenas in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, redistributed themselves fr...
Article
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Sera from 38 free-ranging spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) in the Serengeti ecosystem, Tanzania, were screened for exposure to coronavirus of antigenic group 1. An immunofluorescence assay indicated high levels of exposure to coronavirus among Serengeti hyenas: 95% when considering sera with titer levels of > or = 1:10 and 74% when considering sera...
Article
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In social species with low rates of direct male competition levels of corticosteroids should not correlate with social status. Male spotted hyenas acquire social status by observing strict queuing conventions over many years, and thus levels of male-male aggression are low, and male social status and tenure are closely correlated. In this study, we...
Article
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Avian models of facultative siblicide predict that rates of sibling aggression and the incidence of siblicide should be lower in prey-rich than prey-poor environments, and that siblicide should only occur when fitness benefits outweigh costs. We tested these predictions by comparing data from spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) twin litters in the Ngor...
Article
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Summary • Over the last three decades the main prey species (wildebeest Connochaetes taurinus, zebra Equus burchelli, Thomson’s gazelle Gazella thomsoni, and Grant’s gazelle Gazella granti) of spotted hyaenas Crocuta crocuta in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, substantially declined in numbers, whereas buffalo Syncerus caffer numbers increased stro...
Article
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Little is known about to what extent the sensitivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may be state dependent and vary in the same species between environments. Here we tested whether the faecal corticosteroid concentrations of matrilineal adult female spotted hyenas are influenced by social and reproductive status in adjacent ecosys...
Article
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Members of the genus Colobus have been observed to associate frequently with Cercopithecus monkeys in several African sites. In the Taï National Park, Ivory Coast, one group of western red colobus was found to be in association with one particular group of diana monkeys more than could be expected by chance (Holenweg et al., 1996). We show that dya...

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Project (1)
Project
I aim to assess how human activities have impacted the fitness, distribution, and dietary patterns of spotted hyenas in Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania. I also am collaborating with the Maasai community to understand how spotted hyenas and other large carnivores are affecting their livelihoods through interviews and camera trapping. Using this multi-disciplinary approach, I hope to better understand the drivers and scope of human-carnivore conflict in the NCA and promote coexistence strategies.