Oliver Ehmer

Oliver Ehmer
Universität Osnabrück | UOS · Institut für Romanistik / Latinistik

Doctor of Philosophy & Habilitation

About

34
Publications
4,979
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
161
Citations
Introduction
My research focuses on language in its context of use, mainly in oral communication but also in written media. I am inspired by interactional, cognitive and usage based approaches in linguistics. My research interests include: * Linguistic structure and social interaction, * Language variation and change, and * Digital humanities, language corpora, corpus technology.

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
The present paper analyzes the discourse-pragmatic function of introducing Spanish qué 'what'-interrogatives with the concessive connective pero 'but'. In some contexts, a pero-preface contributes to the interpretation of the interrogative as the realization of an interactional challenge rather than a request for information (e.g. an information qu...
Article
Full-text available
Demonstrations are a central resource for instructing body knowledge. They allow instructors to provide learners with a structured perceptual access to the performance of an activity. The pre-sent paper considers demonstrations as inherently social activities, in which not only the instruc-tor but also the learners may participate. A particular for...
Article
Full-text available
Este artículo presenta la traducción y adaptación al español de la versión revisada de GAT, un sistema de transcripción desarrollado por un grupo alemán de analistas de la conversación y lingüistas de la interacción en 1998. GAT intenta seguir, de la manera más fiel posible, los principios y las convenciones del estilo de transcripción utilizado po...
Article
Full-text available
This contribution focusses on a complex adverbial pattern in spoken French. It will be argued that the pattern is used to manage inferences in interaction. Based on the analysis of different realizations of the pattern, the paper will show that it occurs in two (more or less sedimented) constructions. The first type is a responsive bipartite constr...
Article
Full-text available
This article investigates the interactional relevance of weak cesuras in multimodal transitions in enactments. Previous research has pointed out that enactments are multimodally accomplished phenomena in that they do not only consist of a quotation but usually involve changes in prosody and bodily conduct, too. Furthermore, it has been noted that a...
Article
Full-text available
In the introduction to the special issue on ‘Instructing embodied knowledge’, we present a general orientation into this growing field of research, providing the relevant background for the individual contributions. The starting point for the endeavor is the basic observation that practical knowledge or ‘knowing-how’ is typically of a procedural, i...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Aligned Corpus Toolkit (act) is designed for linguists that work with time aligned transcription data. It offers functions to import and export various annotation file formats ('ELAN' .eaf, 'EXMARaLDA .exb and 'Praat' .TextGrid files), create print transcripts in the style of conversation analysis, search transcripts (span searches across multi...
Book
The special issue is available here: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/opli.2018.4.issue-1/issue-files/opli.2018.4.issue-1.xml
Article
Full-text available
Der vorliegende Beitrag beschäftigt sich mit einer Konstruktion im Sinne der construction grammar, die sowohl im Deutschen wie im Spanisch Verwendung findet: die Exis-tenz-Attributiv-Konstruktion. Sie besteht aus einem teilfixierten Konjunkt 1 (K1), das die Existenzassertion einer personalen Kategorie vornimmt und ein Konjunkt 2 (K2) projiziert, da...
Article
http://www.verlag-gespraechsforschung.de/2013/pdf/veranschaulichungsverfahren.pdf
Conference Paper
This paper presents the results of a joint effort of a group of multimodality researchers and tool developers to improve the interoperability between several tools used for the annotation and analysis of multimodality. Each of the tools has specific strengths so that a variety of differ- ent tools, working on the same data, can be desirable for pro...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Body knowledge. Multimodal practices for instructing corporeal-performative knowledge in interaction The project is based on the observation that ‘knowledge’ is not located exclusively in the brain of human beings. We rather find that our bodies also have memory and knowledge. A very important part of such memory consists of knowledge about physical activities and performative practices, such as, for example, cycling, swimming or, to name much more complex activities, dancing tango or doing aikido. Professional practices also constitute a very significant field for society. From a linguistic perspective, it is remarkably interesting that body knowledge cannot be transmitted using language alone. When learning a physical activity (for instance, tango or aikido), it is not enough to read a book about it. Words themselves are insufficient to transmit this kind of knowledge, so it is necessary to demonstrate, imitate and practice the relevant activity. Nevertheless, lessons in these physical activities also include the use of language, which plays an important role. The relationship between ‘words’ and ‘the body’ in these situations is, however, complex and still unexplored to a large extent. Consequently, the aim of this project is to study, from a linguistic perspective, how participants in a class of this type combine the use of language and their bodies. On the one hand, the project will focus on lessons relating to exclusively physical activities, such as tango, aikido, or Pilates. On the other hand, research will be conducted on professional activities and practices of which language is also an integral part, such as first aid courses, vocational training, and studies in nursing. Conocimientos incorporados. Prácticas multimodales de la enseñanza de conocimientos performativos y corporales El punto de partida del proyecto es la observación de que ‘el saber’ no está localizado solamente en el cerebro de los seres humanos. Más bien, encontramos que el cuerpo también dispone de memoria y conocimiento. Una parte muy importante de esta memoria son los conocimientos sobre actividades físicas y prácticas performativas, como, por ejemplo, andar en bicicleta, nadar o, para nombrar actividades mucho más complejas, bailar tango, hacer aikido. Las prácticas profesionales representan también un ámbito muy importante para la sociedad. Desde una perspectiva lingüística resulta sumamente interesante el hecho de que el saber del cuerpo no se pueda transmitir utilizando exclusivamente la lengua. Al momento de aprender una actividad física (por ejemplo, bailar tango o hacer aikido) no es suficiente con leer un libro al respecto. Las palabras por sí mismas no alcanzan para transmitir este tipo de conocimiento, sino que hay que demostrar, imitar y practicar esa actividad. Sin embargo, en las clases de estas actividades físicas, también se utiliza el idioma, el cual juega un rol importante. La relación entre ‘la palabra’ y ‘el cuerpo’ en estas situaciones es, empero, compleja y todavía inexplorada en su mayor parte. El fin del proyecto entonces es investigar desde una perspectiva lingüística cómo los integrantes de una clase de este tipo utilizan el lenguaje y sus cuerpos en conjunto. El proyecto se centrará, por un lado, en clases de actividades que son exclusivamente físicas como tango, aikido, pilates. Por otro lado, se van a investigar actividades y prácticas profesionales en las cuales el lenguaje también forma una parte integral, como, por ejemplo, cursos de primeros auxilios, oficios y cursos de formación en Enfermería. Körperwissen. Multimodale Verfahren der Vermittlung performativ-körperlichen Wissens in der Interaktion Ausgangspunkt des Projektes ist die Beobachtung, dass ‘Wissen’ nicht ausschließlich im menschlichen Gehirn lokalisierbar ist, sondern auch der Körper über ein Gedächtnis und über Kenntnisse verfügt. Ein sehr wichtiger Teil dieses Gedächtnisses ist das Wissen über die Ausführung physischer Aktivitäten und Praktiken, wobei man von performativ-praktischem Wissen spricht. Hierzu zählt beispielsweise Wissen darüber wie man Fahrrad fährt oder schwimmt, oder – um wesentlich komplexere Aktivitäten zu nennen – wie man Tango tanzt, Aikido ausübt oder ein Musikinstrument spielt. Über solche rein körperliche Aktivität hinaus spiel Körperwissen auch in anderen Bereichen eine wichtige Rolle, wie beispielsweise in medizinischen Berufen oder Handwerksberufen. Aus einer sprachwissenschaftlichen Perspektive ist nun interessant interessant, dass Körperwissen nicht ausschließlich über die Sprache weitergegeben werden kann. Beim Erlernen einer körperlichen Aktivität ist es nicht ausreichend, ein Buch über diese Aktivität zu lesen. Wörter alleine reichen also nicht, um diese Art von Wissen zu vermitteln. Vielmehr muss diese Aktivität in einem körperlichen Prozess von Lehrenden demonstriert und von Lernenden imitiert und geübt werden. Dennoch wird im Unterricht physischer Aktivitäten auch Sprache verwendet, die eine wichtige Rolle spielt. Das Verhältnis zwischen ‘dem gesprochenen Wort’ und ‘dem Körper’ in solchen Vermittlungssituationen ist komplex und bislang relativ wenig untersucht. Ziel des Forschungsprojektes ist es, aus linguistischer Perspektive zu untersuchen, wie die Interagierenden im Unterricht Sprache und Körper in feiner Abstimmung aufeinander verwenden. Das Projekt ist zum einen auf Aktivitäten wie Tango, Aikido und Pilates gerichtet, die ausschließlich körperlich realisiert werden. Zum anderen werden Aktivitäten und Ausübungen untersucht, in denen nicht nur körperliches Wissen, sondern auch anderes Fachwissen eine wichtige Rülle spielt, wie beispielsweise bei der Realisierung erster Erste-Hilfe, der Krankenpflege und im Handwerk.
Project
The scientific network "Interactional Linguistics", funded by the German Research Foundation, examines particular types of discourse particles – that is, words (and fixed phrases that behave similarly) that are used to organize, maintain, or regulate interaction between speaker and recipient – from a comparative-linguistic perspective. We focus on question tags (e.g. isn’t it?), response particles (which provide answers to questions, e.g. yes or exactly), and repair markers (e.g. uh or no) in a set of typologically diverse languages, namely, the spoken variants of Arabic, Czech, English, Finnish, French, Low and Standard German, Hebrew, Mandarin Chinese, Polish, Spanish, Turkish, and Yurakaré. The network takes the communicative tasks of questioning, responding, and initiating repair as a starting point. As these tasks prove to be similar across speech communities, and must be accomplished regularly by interlocutors, our focus on particles as specific linguistic means for performing these tasks provides ideal grounds for identifying potentially generic linguistic resources of human social interaction, and for exploring the extent of possible language-specific variation. More specifically, our aim is to explore i) the array of particles the different languages provide for these communicative tasks, and the different functions these particles have in each of the languages studied, ii) whether there are recurrent particles that are used cross-linguistically for these tasks, e.g. phonetic variants of huh as question tags, of hm as response particles, or of uh as repair markers, and iii) the relationships between the three different types of particles. On the one hand, question tags and response particles occur within the same sequential environment (question-response sequences), which allows for the investigation of possible co-occurrences of certain question tags and response particles across languages. On the other hand, comparing all three types of particles in each language, we will be able to explore relationships between them, e.g. regarding the existence of polyfunctional particles in the two different conversational systems, that is, sequence organization (question tags, response particles) and the repair system (repair markers). Through this approach, the network hopes to gain insights into how these types of discourse particles are organized across languages, and how they are used for accomplishing certain generic interactional tasks.
Project
'Emergent remembering, fragmented syntax and textual coherence' investigates how speakers and writers cope with the challenge of telling traumatic experiences (World War II, forced labour, concentration camps, etc.) in order to better understand the extent to which fragmented syntax (restarts, trail-offs, parentheses) is not (only) a symptom of problems, such as remembering or contextualising. Rather, it could also be a strategy to cope with the challenge of relaying these experiences and/or to enhance recipient design in emergent storytelling. The data stems from oral history interviews, collaborative Sofa Talks and French post war literature (Claude Simon, Jorge Semprún, ...). Research is carried out in coordination with the Zürich team of French Literary and Cultural Studies (Director: Professor Dr. Thomas Klinkert).