Olga Lozovskaya

Olga Lozovskaya
Institute for the History of Material Culture, Russian Academy of Science, St.Petersbourg, Russia · Laboratory for Experimental Traceology

PhD

About

94
Publications
17,693
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392
Citations
Education
September 1981 - June 1987
Saint Petersburg State University
Field of study
  • Archaeology

Publications

Publications (94)
Preprint
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The transitions from foraging to farming and later to pastoralism in Stone Age Eurasia (c. 11-3 thousand years before present, BP) represent some of the most dramatic lifestyle changes in human evolution. We sequenced 317 genomes of primarily Mesolithic and Neolithic individuals from across Eurasia combined with radiocarbon dates, stable isotope da...
Article
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Mesolithic geometric ornamentation is a part of the complex worldview of the latest hunter-gatherer societies. Questions about the functional role of the ornament in utilitarian objects – knives, daggers, arrowheads, etc. – do not have an unambiguous answer. Despite a variability of ornamental motives used, there are some stable connections between...
Article
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In the Middle Holocene, favorable living conditions were formed environmental on the territory of the modern Upper Volga River, which, after the retreat of the latest glacier, abounded with a branched system of feeders. They contributed to the economic stability driven by hunting for elk and beaver, waterfowl and marsh birds, as well as intensive f...
Article
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Период позднего мезолита в Верхнем Поволжье характеризуется многочисленными свидетельствами изобразительной деятельности. По материалам многослойной стоянки Замостье 2 (Московская область) наибольший расцвет орнаментации костяного (рогового) инвентаря прослеживается во второй половине VII тыс. до н. э. (cal BC), а в раннем неолите резко идет на спа...
Article
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The most important changes in the economy and material culture in foraging societies of the Eastern Europe forest zone on the eve of the spread of ceramic production coincided with the 8.2 ka Cold Event and its consequences. We consider these changes in the local example of the site Zamostje 2 located in Volga-Oka region, using results of long-time...
Book
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The collection of scientific works is devoted to modern research on the interaction of the natural environment and the prehistoric population of Eastern Europe. Particular attention is paid to the study of the impact of abrupt climate change in the early Holocene on the material culture and economy of the Neolithic and sub-Neolithic communities. Th...
Article
Relationship between the prehistoric human and the surrounding fauna has always been of a complex nature and consisted of material and non-material elements. Sculptural images of animals and birds made of various materials (bone, antler, flint, or wood) are a typical feature of the surviving evidence of the spiritual culture of Mesolithic and Neoli...
Article
Materials of the multilayer wetland site Zamostje 2 are key to study the human cultural history of the Volga-Oka interfluve in Central Russia due to the diversity and completeness of the material culture, on the one hand, and encompass large information potential of fragile organic remains preserved in the waterlogged conditions, on the other hand....
Article
Only 21 human remains have been identified at Zamostje 2, despite extraordinarily good conditions for organic preservation, and the recovery of thousands of animal bones from layers dating from the Late Mesolithic to the Middle Neolithic (c.6500–4000 cal BC). Almost all the human remains are fragments of the cranium, maxilla, mandible, which are po...
Article
The Neolithization of Northern Eurasia is marked by the emergence of pottery among hunter-gatherer societies. The driving forces behind the adoption of ceramic cooking vessels among non-agricultural societies remain unclear, although previous research, mainly in North East Asia (e.g. Japan, Korea and the Russian Far East), suggests that it was adop...
Article
Full-text available
The economy of the Mesolithic and Early Neolithic population of the forest zone of Eastern Europe was highly dependent on the exploitation of water resources. The settlements of ancient hunters -fishermen along the shores of large lakes succeeded each other for millennia. It was at this time that fish from an episodic food gradually became an impor...
Presentation
In Northern Eurasia, the Neolithic is marked by the adoption of pottery by hunter-gatherer communities. The degree to which this is related to wider social and lifestyle changes is subject to ongoing debate and the focus of a new research programme. The use and function of early pottery by pre-agricultural societies during the 7th-5th millennia BC...
Article
Full-text available
The fi gurative activity is a characteristic feature of the prehistoric culture. Vessels and weapons were the most frequent objects that underwent “decoration”. However, the purpose of decorated items often remains unclear, which suggests their use for symbolic purposes. Numerous images of animals and birds dated back to the Mesolithic and Neolithi...
Presentation
In north-eastern Europe, resource-rich aquatic and boreal ecotopes were created with the stabilization of climate during the early Holocene, with a climatic optimum from ca, 8ka cal BP. During this period, pottery technology also dispersed across the continent and was taken up by a broad range of hunter-gatherer societies. We aim to explore how ear...
Presentation
This study focuses on the site of Zamostje 2, occupied during the Atlantic period from around 7,000 to 5,500 cal BC. Faunal remains suggest a broad subsistence economy based on hunting/gathering/fishing throughout the late Mesolithic and Neolithic, the latter period defined by the introduction of pottery. In order to examine the motivation for its...
Article
Full-text available
The Upper Volga culture (UVC) in the Volga and Oka basin is one of the earliest pottery cultures in Eastern Europe. The Sakhtysh IIa site is attributed to the core area of the UVC, with pottery encompassing all stages of this culture. A detailed analysis of artefact deposition in different lay­ers allows the creation of chronological models of earl...
Article
Full-text available
The Upper Volga culture (UVC) in the Volga and Oka basin is one of the earliest pottery cultures in Eastern Europe. The Sakhtysh IIa site is attributed to the core area of the UVC, with pottery encompassing all stages of this culture. A detailed analysis of artefact deposition in different lay­ers allows the creation of chronological models of earl...
Poster
Full-text available
In north-eastern Europe, resource-rich aquatic and boreal ecotopes were created with the stabilization of climate during the early Holocene, with a climatic optimum from ca, 8ka cal BP. During this period, pottery technology also dispersed across the continent and was taken up by a broad range of hunter-gatherer societies. We aim to explore how ear...
Article
Full-text available
Artefacts from Zamostje 2, a Mesolithic site in the Volga-Oka interfluve, are used to review morphological patterns and discuss interpretations of one of the least studied groups of ranged weapons, i. e. large points of spears or leisters. Despite strong similarity of proportions and techniques used in shaping some components, the points show subst...
Article
Full-text available
Prehistoric sites preserved in the waterlogged environments of northern Europe, the Baltic region, and Russia possess a number of common features related to the specifics of their locations in prehistoric times and the later conditions of their preservation. The lake settlements of the forest zone of European Russia did not undergo any drastic chan...
Article
Full-text available
Investigations of Stone Age waterlogged sites in eastern Europe pose a great scientific interest due to the excellent preservation of organic materials. Excavations of settlements like Sārnate, Zvidze (Latvia), Šventoji (Lithuania), Purkajasuo (Finland), and Okhta 1 (Russia) are among the best examples of such research. New investigations in 2010–2...
Book
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Fishing in the late Mesolithic and early Neolithic of the Russian Plain: the case of site Zamostje 2
Chapter
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Urge to natural shapes is inherent to the human being. This fact is vividly illustrated by a unique type of the cutting artefact— made of the beaver lower jaw—with a natural haft. The nature itself created a multipurpose wood-focused tool equipped with a comfortable and ergonomic handle. This instrument type was extraordinarily popular among the Me...
Article
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Zamostje 2, on the Dubna River, c.100km north of Moscow, appears to offer an ideal opportunity to understand the relative and absolute chronology of Upper Volga Early Neolithic pottery. More than 100 radiocarbon (14C) dates are available from a stratigraphic sequence which spans from the Late Mesolithic to the Middle Neolithic. All typological stag...
Chapter
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During decades of investigations on site Zamostje 2 a special attention was paid to late Mesolithic and early Neolithic layers, and middle Neolithic Lyalovo culture layer remained partly uninvestigated. However recent excavations on the site raised a number of serious question concerning problems of formation of the layer, occupation area and chron...
Chapter
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This paper presents pottery complex from Middle Neolithic Lyalovo culture layer of site Zamostje 2. Total amount of pottery fragments found during all years of excavations is 26911, among them 506 pieces belong to the early (archaic) stage, 9246 — to the middle (developed) stage and 17159 — to the late stage of Lyalovo culture. The most popular dec...
Chapter
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CONCLUSION Given the new AMS results from Zamostje 2, we cannot date the first Upper Volga pottery at this site to before c. 5700 cal BC. While we would not assume that Zamostje 2 was the first site with pottery in central Russia, it is difficult to accept that pottery was produced in this region for c. 300 years before it appeared at Zamostje 2, i...
Chapter
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Investigations of waterlogged cultural layers from lake and peat-bog settlements faced with the problem of interpreting the paleogeographic situation and the conditions of formation of deposits with the remains of material culture, which include fragile organic materials. On the basis of complex data — both archaeological and paleoecological — the...
Article
This article presents the results of technological analyses of the laminar products from three bone dwelling structures from the Mezhyrich site (dated to Upper Palaeolithic; 15,000–14,500 years BP). More than 2500 blades and bladelets were studied from technological point of view. We find close similarity between the three dwellings, which reflects...
Article
Full-text available
The paper describes the complex of Early Neolithic Upper Volga culture pottery from site Zamostje 2. The analysis revealed that the vast majority of ceramics found during the excavation of site belong to the first stage of development of the Upper Volga culture - ceramics without ornaments and fragments with ornaments comprised of small dots and no...
Article
Full-text available
The multilayer waterlogged site Zamostje 2 in Central Russia represents a unique opportunity to study the interplay of human cultural history and its environmental context over the late Mesolithic – Middle Neolithic, ca. 7900–5500 BP (7000–4300 BC). Compared to previous paleogeographical reconstructions made more than 15 years ago and pollen diagra...
Article
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L'estudi d'eines de fusta provinents de jaciments prehistòrics de medis humits suscita qüestions en torn trets específics vinculats als seus mètodes de manufactura. L'estudi es fonamenta en una experimentació realitzada amb instruments de pedra, os i banya emprats en el treball de fusta, i en l'estudi de les traces tecnològiques desenvolupades sobr...
Chapter
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Fishing was a fundamental element of the subsistence economy of the Mesolithic and Neolithic inhabitants of Zamostje 2, located on the Central Russian Plain (Sergiev Possad, Moscow). This is attested by the astronomical amounts of fish remains found at this site, along with fishing tools such as harpoons, netting needles, net weights, hooks and de-...
Article
Full-text available
Zamostje 2 is a river bank site located in the region of Serguev Possad (Russia). This site is constituted by occupations from the late Mesolithic to the middle Neolithic. If no habitat was discovered, structures and many artefacts dealing with fishing practices have been found there. Our attention was drawn by a particular typological set of bone...
Chapter
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Several fishery constructions were found during investigations on the site Zamostje 2. Three fish-traps made from pine and spruce splinters were discovered during surface excavations. They dated to the early Neolithic period. Another two constructions made from long pine, spruce and willow splinters were found during underwater prospection in river...
Chapter
Full-text available
Fishing played a fundamental role in the subsistence economy of the Mesolithic and Neolithic inhabitants of Zamostje 2, a site located on the Russian plain (Sergiev Possad, Moscow). The abundant ichtiofaunal remains and the tools found at the site (harpoons, needle nets, fishhooks and scaling knives) corroborate this importance. In this article, we...
Chapter
Full-text available
Experimentation was carried out with bone tools and equipment connected with fishing and processing fish. Experiments with four fish species showed that the specific characteristics of their teeth leave different marks on the fishing hooks. The marks identified on harpoons and knives made from elk ribs and used to scale and gut fish are also descri...