Olga Biosca

Olga Biosca
Glasgow Caledonian University | GCU · Yunus Centre for Social Business and Health

PhD

About

30
Publications
7,005
Reads
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120
Citations
Citations since 2016
21 Research Items
113 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - present
Glasgow Caledonian University
Position
  • Lecturer
August 2015 - July 2019
Glasgow Caledonian University
Position
  • Lecturer
August 2012 - July 2015
Glasgow Caledonian University
Position
  • Lecturer in Social Business and Microfinance

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
Place-based creative programmes can help alleviate the structural and place-related problems that affect older adults' health. However, it is unclear why these programmes achieve positive outcomes, and how these may vary across contexts. This critical realist review aimed to address these gaps. We were able to evidence why these programmes may work...
Article
Full-text available
Taking advantage of the passage of a microfinance law in Italy (2014), we explore the rationales for introducing microfinance-specific regulation in high-income welfare states and the potential effects that this process may have on MFIs’ social and financial performances (i.e. double bottom line). Our findings suggest that the institutional transfo...
Chapter
Full-text available
The purpose of this chapter is to provide a detailed overview of the UK legal and institutional factors at the macro-level that can be regarded as decisive for explaining the effective capacity of the country to integrate migrants, refugees and asylum seekers into the labour market. By doing so, we aim to better understand the conditions within whi...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This is the final report of the FinWell London research project which aimed to review the ways in which money and health interrelate in the lives of people in urban places, such as the London boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark. This work offers an analysis of how, why and for whom financial health and long-term conditions interact and recommends wa...
Article
The widening health gap between the best and worst-off in the UK requires innovative solutions that act upon the social, economic and environmental causes of ill-health. Initiatives such as microcredit have been conceptualised as having the potential to act on the social determinants of health. However, pathways that lead to this impact have yet to...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter discusses UK-based civil society organisations supporting vulnerable groups (migrants, refugees and asylum seekers; disabled people; and the unemployed) which have been on the front line of a decade of austerity and funding cuts. It does so by exploring the relationship between these organisations and policymakers; the impact of auster...
Chapter
Social policy networks consisting of diverse and independent organizations are a popular instrument to implement policy at community level. However, little is known about the way in which different types of organizations collaborate in these networks and if these interactions depend on the nature of their funding (public/private) and/or their remit...
Article
Full-text available
Financially vulnerable, low-income individuals are more likely to experience financial exclusion as they are unable to access financial services that meet their needs. How do they cope with economic instability, and what is the role of social networks in their coping strategies? Using financial diaries, we explore the day-to-day monetary transactio...
Article
Full-text available
Networks of organizations involved in public policy implementation require strong interaction, concerted action and high degrees of collaboration to be effective. However, little is known about how different types of organizations involved in implementation of multi-sectoral social policies interact in these networks. In this article the relationsh...
Chapter
It is well documented that individuals who are materially worse-off have poorer health and subjective wellbeing. Despite their limited means, we also know these same individuals can have complicated financial lives. However, it is not clear how individuals’ strategies for managing their wealth impact on broader aspects of their wellbeing. In this c...
Article
Solidarity among member states, one of the European Union’s (EU) fundamental values, has recently been put to the test by numerous and diverse challenges that have led to a “crisis of solidarity.” In the United Kingdom, the decision in June 2016 by the electorate to vote to leave the EU revealed the British dimension of this crisis. However, little...
Article
Full-text available
Background Health inequalities in the UK have proved to be stubborn, and health gaps between best and worst-off are widening. While there is growing understanding of how the main causes of poor health are perceived among different stakeholders, similar insight is lacking regarding what solutions should be prioritised. Furthermore, we do not know th...
Conference Paper
Background Health inequalities in the UK have proved to be stubborn, and health gaps between best and worst-off are widening. While we have an understanding of how the main causes of poor health are perceived among different stakeholders, similar insight is lacking regarding what solutions should be prioritised. Furthermore, we do not know the rela...
Chapter
Full-text available
Solidarity in contemporary Britain has come under pressure not only as a result of the global financial crisis and the ensuing austerity measures but also against a backdrop of constitutional volatility from the Scottish independence referendum in 2014 and the vote to leave the EU in 2016. Using cross-sectional data from an original survey of 2083...
Article
Innovative interventions that address the social determinants of health are required to help reduce persistent health inequalities. We argue that microcredit can act in this way and develop a conceptual framework from which to examine this. In seeking to evaluate microcredit this way we then examine how randomized controlled trials, currently consi...
Research
Full-text available
This report presents preliminary findings about the activities of civil society organizations (CSOs) working in the filed of migration/asylum, disability and unemployment in the UK. It reflects also the impact of the economic crisis and austerity policies on these CSOs' work. The report is part of a research delivery of the Horizon 2020 project Tra...
Article
Obesity is a global health concern. This is the first study to explore if the relationship between body fatness and time preference is consistent across different ways of objectively measuring body fatness. Our second aim is to explore if there are differential associations between educational attainment and being a saver to determine if education...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we discuss the challenge posed by growing inequalities, specifically health inequalities, which have grown increasingly wider in recent decades. Rather than arguing for a wholesale return to state intervention to curb the worst excesses of the market, we put forward a less obvious potential solution, arguing for a greater role - and g...
Article
Full-text available
Background There is a growing need to identify upstream public health interventions as an alternative means of acting on health. Microfinance has been portrayed in this regard in public health journals. Furthermore, microfinance has spread to more-advanced economies where it offers potential as an alternative means of acting on persistent and growi...
Article
It has become common to try and increase the effectiveness of microfinance programmes by adding supplementary services to the financial product. However, the added value accruing from this ‘credit-plus’ approach has been little analysed. We hypothesise that the extent of added value from credit-plus depends on the ability of the credit supplier to...
Article
Non-financial programs are being used by microfinance institutions to manage reputational risks and competitive pressures.
Article
In Latin America, health care is costly for the poor. More than half of the population is frequently excluded from salary-based health insurance schemes. The need to pay for health out-of-pocket continues to have a devastating and impoverishing effect on the more vulnerable. Equitable and efficient health financing is a major policy priority in mos...
Article
Background: Achieving universal health insurance coverage is a goal for many developing countries. Even when universal health insurance programmes are in place, there are significant barriers to reaching the lowest socio-economic groups such as a lack of awareness of the programmes or knowledge of the benefits to participating in the insurance mar...
Article
Full-text available
Microfinance non-financial services have been recently reformulated as high quality demand-led programs. In the Mexican context, these are now voluntary, can have a cost for the borrower and are frequently supplied in partnership with specialized public or private agencies. Using primary data from a survey of clients of two credit-plus programs in...

Network

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Despite an established link between income and health, limited evidence exists on the health impacts of income-based initiatives such as fair microcredit. Microcredit is a small, collateral-free loan, supplied at fair interest rates to the low-income and financially excluded population. In this study we establish, from the perspective of target communities, if an association exists between the use of microcredit and health and wellbeing, and the mechanisms through which any perceived association operates. For more info see: https://www.cso.scot.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/Focus-on-Research-CZH-4-1095-1.pdf
Project
www.sirius-project.eu Despite the polarization in public and policy debates generated by the post-2014 influxes of refugees, asylum seekers and migrants, European countries need to devise an evidence-based strategy towards tackling migration and asylum issues using a constructive and sustainable approach. The proposed project, SIRIUS, builds on a multi-dimensional conceptual framework in which host country or political-institutional, societal and individual-related conditions function either as enablers or as barriers to migrants’, refugees’ and asylum seekers’ integration via the labour market. SIRIUS has three main objectives: A descriptive objective: To provide systematic evidence on post-2014 migrants, refugees and asylum applicants especially women and young people and their potential for labour market employment and, more broadly, social integration. An explanatory objective: To advance knowledge on the complexity of labour market integration for post-2014 migrants, refugees and asylum applicants, and to explore their integration potential by looking into their spatial distribution (in relation to the distribution of labour demand across the labour market), while taking into account labour market characteristics and needs in different country and socio-economic contexts. A prescriptive objective: To advance a theoretical framework for an inclusive integration agenda, outlining an optimal mix of policy pathways for labour market integration including concrete steps that Member States and other European countries along with the EU can take to ensure that migrant-integration policies and the broader system of workforce-development, training, and employment programmes support new arrivals’ access to decent work opportunities and working conditions. The research design consists of a multidimensional theoretical framework that combines macro-level (legal/policy/institutional), meso-level (organizational), and micro-level (individual) enabling and hindering factors impacting on (the potential for) labour market and social integration, a cross-national comparative design that includes seven European countries with different degrees of exposure to the recent migration and refugee crisis, different institutional and socio-economic contexts, an integrated methodological approach based on multiple methods (quantitative data gathering and analyses of macro-economic, labour market forecasting, qualitative analyses and related data gathering tools such as in-depth interviews, focus groups, observations, organizational study) and an innovative dissemination plan involving online priority action networks, film essays, festival, job affair and an applied game for young migrants, refugees, asylum applicants, scientific and policy dialogue workshops and conferences).