Ole Tendal

Ole Tendal
University of Copenhagen · State Natural History Museum of Denmark

Dr. phil.

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65
Publications
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Publications

Publications (65)
Article
Four cores from Vestnesa Ridge on the western Svalbard margin from water depth of 1200 m have been studied. The Vestnesa Ridge is known for the presence of numerous pockmarks and active methane gas seepage is often observed in the form of acoustic gas flares. Three of the cores were collected from a pockmark with active seepage of methane and one c...
Article
During his scientific career, largely from 1910-1970, the Danish cnidarian specialist P.L. Kramp authored 94 scientific papers, and more than 30 other kinds of publications, such as reports and popular articles. Kramp was affiliated with the marine department of the Zoological Museum of the University of Copenhagen (now: The Natural History Museum...
Preprint
Full-text available
Currently, > 4,000 macro- and megabenthic invertebrate species are known from Arctic seas, representing the majority of marine faunal diversity in this region. This estimate is expected to increase with future studies. Benthic invertebrates are important ecosystem components as food for fishes, marine mammals, seabirds and humans. The Benthos Exper...
Preprint
Full-text available
Currently, > 4,000 macro- and megabenthic invertebrate species are known from Arctic seas, representing the majority of marine faunal diversity in this region. This estimate is expected to increase with future studies. Benthic invertebrates are important ecosystem components as food for fishes, marine mammals, seabirds and humans. The Benthos Exper...
Article
Sponges form an important component of benthic ecosystems from shallow littoral to hadal depths. In the deep ocean, beyond the continental shelf, sponges can form high-density fields, constituting important habitats supporting rich benthic communities. Yet these habitats remain relatively unexplored. The oil and gas industry has played an important...
Chapter
Sponges form an important component of benthic ecosystems from shallow littoral to hadal depths. In the deep ocean, beyond the continental shelf, sponges can form high-density fields, constituting important habitats supporting rich benthic communities. Yet these habitats remain relatively unexplored. The oil and gas industry has played an important...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter reviews the major known monospecific and multispecific sponge aggregations in the world’s oceans. They are shown to occur from the intertidal to abyssal depths, in tropical, temperate, and high latitudes and sometimes to create spectacular formations, such as glass sponge reefs, lithistid reef-like fields, and carnivorous sponge ground...
Article
We present new data on xenophyophores from the Russian license area of the Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ) in the abyssal eastern equatorial Pacific based on samples collected in box cores during cruises of the R/V “Yuzhmorgeologia” in 2009–2012. The new material yielded five species of these giant foraminifera: Psammina multiloculata Kamenskaya, Goo...
Article
Full-text available
A total of 228 bryozoan species are recorded within the EEZ of the Faroe Islands, 74 of which are new to the area. Analysis of the distribution of the species among six sectors, each characterized by different environmental conditions, showed three faunal assemblages. Variation of the total Faroese bryozoan fauna and of the bryozoan fauna of most s...
Article
Full-text available
The first living sample of Lophelia pertusa from Greenlandic waters was inadvertently collected at 60.3675°, −48.45528°, entangled together with other corals to a seawater sampler and property sensor (CTD) package. We collected in situ photographs taken at two sites in the same area in order to determine whether a reef was present. We identified re...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter reviews the major known monospecific and multispecific sponge aggregations in the world’s oceans. They are shown to occur from the intertidal to abyssal depths, in tropical, temperate, and high latitudes and sometimes to create spectacular formations, such as glass sponge reefs, lithistid reef-like fields, and carnivorous sponge ground...
Article
Full-text available
We describe three new and one poorly-known species of psamminid xenophyophores (giant foraminifera), all of which were found attached to polymetallic nodules in the Russian claim area of the Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone (CCFZ; abyssal eastern equatorial Pacific, 4,716-4,936 m water depth). Semipsammina licheniformis sp. nov. is the second speci...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Between mid-December 2011 and mid-January 2012 an unusual mixture of ctenophores was observed and collected at Kerteminde harbour (Great Belt, Denmark). In addition to native zooplanktivorous species Pleurobrachia pileus (O.F. Müller, 1776) and Bolinopsis infundibulum (O.F. Müller, 1776), non-native zooplanktivorous Mnemiopsis leidyi A. Ag...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT. Sampling gears employed in the Thai-Danish Biodiversity Surveys included the triangular dredge, rectangular dredge, Agassiz trawl (Agassiz dredge), beam trawl, otter trawl, detritus sledge (Ockelmann sledge), epibenthic sledge (Rothlisberg-Pearcy hyperbenthic sledge), Smith-Mcintyre grab, and box corer. The surveys aimed to improve the...
Article
Full-text available
Data on individual specimens in the computerized database of the PMBC Reference Collection are revised. Data includes PMBC accession number and locality information .A total of 650 lots of the Class Cephalopoda are deposited in the Reference Collection of Phuket Marine Biological Center. The collection includes 54 cephalopod species, representing 1...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background / Purpose: The worldwide so called “golf ball” sponges (Tetillidae Sollas, 1886) are massive oval/spherical sponges that can reach 20cm in diameter. Atlantic boreo-arctic Tetillidae live in the deep sea and were poorly described in the late 18th or 19th century, so most of these species are poorly known.This revision is essentially bas...
Article
Geodia species north of 60°N in the Atlantic appeared in the literature for the first time when Bowerbank described Geodia barretti and G. macandrewii in 1858 from western Norway. Since then, a number of species have been based on material from various parts of the region: G. simplex, Isops phlegraei, I. pallida, I. sphaeroides, Synops pyriformis,...
Article
Full-text available
Until 2012, living colonial stone corals had not been recorded in Greenland. However, in that year two Canadian expeditions found living specimens of Lophelia pertusa, the eye-coral, and showed the presence of reef-like structures at about 800 m depth off southwest Greenland. The considerable extension of the known geographic range of these corals...
Article
Full-text available
The paper reports on two new species of calcareous sponges (Porifera, Calcarea) from the Antarctic Weddell Sea, Clath-rina brandtae sp. nov. and Leucetta delicata sp. nov., collected at 600 m depth during the ANT XXIV/2-SYSTCO expe-dition in January 2008. The new species are described based on a combination of morphological and molecular data. With...
Article
Full-text available
Fifteen bryozoan species were found on three species of brachiopods in the Faroe area, but only two of the brachiopod species can be regarded as common biogenic substrates for bryozoans. Incrusting bryozoan species were the most diverse compared to other growthforms. A maximum of five species were found on one valve, but usually from one to three...
Article
Full-text available
In September 2008, orange-striped sea anemone Diadumene lineata (verril, 1869) was recorded for the first time in denmark. Numerous live specimens of the sea anemone were found in a small inlet connected to the large coastal lagoon bovet bugt on the island laesoe in kattegat. following the initial discovery, their abundance has been estimated throu...
Article
Full-text available
X-radiography revealed that borings of Cliona celata in a shell belonged to two individuals which showed strict avoidance of coalescence. A special development of small branches of the borings occurs along the “zone of proximity” between the two sponges. Possible reasons for the non-coalescence are discussed.
Article
Full-text available
This report draws together scientific understanding of deep-water sponge grounds alongside the threats they face and ways in which they can be conserved. Beginning with a summary of research approaches, sponge biology and biodiversity, the report also gives up-to-date case studies of particular deep-water sponge habitats from around the world. Thes...
Article
Recent investigations convincingly establish that the choanocyte is one of the principal cell types of sponges. The spermatozoon and the egg can be derived from choanocytes also in terms of orientation of the cell and function of certain cell surface areas. The idea that different functional properties are bound to certain surface areas of this cel...
Article
Full-text available
A photo transect along the continental slope off Morocco, Northwest Africa revealed an extensive population of the hexactinellid sponge Pheronema carpenteri (thomson, 1869). The population forms a distinct band parallel to the depth contours between 740 and 820 m. Because of the long persistence of dead hexactinellid skeletons, living and dead indi...
Article
Full-text available
The paper deals with sponges collected in the Atlantic by the Swedish Deep Sea Expedition. The collection contains six species of the genera Malaco-saccus, Chonelasma, heptonema, Asbestopluma, and Chondrocladia, which are well known from the deep-sea. Three new species are described, viz. Asbestopluma quadriserialis sp.n., Chondrocladia al-batrossi...
Article
Full-text available
The project 'Biodiversity of the Andaman Sea Shelf (BIOSHELF)' attempted to cover the west coast of Thailand, from the Burmese border in the north to the Malaysian border in the south. The objective of the project, during 1996--2000, was to expand our general knowledge of the diversity of benthos at depths down to 1000 m within the Thai Economic...
Article
Full-text available
THE BIOFAR PROGRAMMEIt is expected that a large number of scientific papers on marine benthic animals from Faroese waters will be published in SARSIA and elsewhere in the coming years. The authors of these articles will need to include or refer to lists of sampling stations for detailed information. A complete list, giving information on all deploy...
Article
The reproductive cycle of the sponge Halichondria panicea was investigated at Boknis Eck in the Western Kiel Bight over 2 yr, and over 1 yr on the island Helgoland in the North Sea and was compared with material collected earlier at Tjärnö at the Swedish west coast. Temperature and salinity were monitored at the different stations in order to deter...
Article
Xenophyophores, large deep-sea rhizopodan protists, are very rare in Antarctic seas. One specimen of Reticulammina antarctica nov. spec. was retrieved from bathyal depths in the Weddell Sea and preserved in a comparatively good condition, thus allowing a cytological description. Faecal pellets (stercomata) enclosed within the test were found to con...
Article
Three species of the sponge genus Geodia (G. baretti; G. macandrewii and G. sp.), one species of the genus Isops (I. phlegraei), and one species of the genus Stryphnus (S. ponderosus), collected at the Faroe Islands were characterized by morphological structure, chemical composition and macrofauna. The chemotaxonomic value of amino acids and sterol...
Chapter
Fossil benthic and planktonic foraminifers play a major role in paleontology, first of all as a stratigraphic tool, but also in paleoecology, paleoclimatology, paleoceanography and paleobiogeography. Recent foraminifers are abundant and diverse in nearly all modern marine ecosystems, and although little is known about their life as organisms, they...
Article
The volatile components of the marine sponge,Halichondria panicea, collected at Clever Bank in the North Sea were investigated by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The penetrating stench of the sponge is explained by identification of three sulfur compounds (dimethyl di- and, trisulfide and methyl benzyI sulfide). Much less odiferous s...
Article
Eight species of xenophyophores, seven of them new, are described from epibenthic sledge material collected in the north-east Atlantic by the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences. A new genus is established for two of the new species, Homogammina lamina and H. maculosa. The other five new species are Galatheammina discoveryi, G. microconcha, Psammin...
Article
A vertical life position for Astrorhiza arenaria in the sediment surface is suggested from a study of box cores and bottom photographs from the southern Barents Sea. The specimens recovered include the largest ever reported, measuring approximately 3 cm in maximum dimension. The position and distribution of live specimens suggest that this species...
Article
Full-text available
Four species of Thenea are recognized in the North Atlantic instead of two, T. muricata (Bowerbank, 1858) and T. abyssorum Koltun, 1959, as currently believed. T. valdiviae Lendenfeld, 1906 and T. levis Lendenfeld, 1906, are removed from the synonymy with T. muricata, and the first description of fully grown specimens of T. levis is given. Most arc...
Article
Full-text available
Recent cruises to the Chatham Rise and to the Challenger Plateau have provided new material of 3 species of xenophyophores: Reticulam‐mina labyrinthica Tendal, 1972; Syringammina fragillissima Brady, 1883; and S. tasmanensis Lewis, 1966. These records confirm the occurrence of S. fragillissima in New Zealand waters, indicate a wide distribution of...
Article
Some 23 species of sponges have been recorded from depths <200m around the island of Jan Mayen.-from Author
Article
Full-text available
Xenophyophores are a group of giant, but extremely fragile, rhizopod protozoans generally found at lower bathyal or abyssal depths. Recent dredge samples and photographs suggest that there is a largely endemic fauna of xenophyophores with anastomosing branches living at upper bathyal depths around New Zealand. Their distribution may be related to t...
Article
Full-text available
Komokiacea n . superfam . (Textulariina. Foramini-1928. Lana n . gen., Baculella n . gen., and Edgertonia n . ferida. Protozoa) comprises agglutinating foramini-gen . are described . Two families. Komokiidae and fers with test consisting of a complex system of fine. Baculellidae. are erected . branching tubules of even diameter . The test wall is T...
Article
The xenophyophore (Rhizopodea, Protozoa) Semipsammina fixa n.gen., n.sp., lives on plant material and is the first certain example of an attached species within this group. It is the deepest record for the order Psamminida.

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Projects (2)
Archived project
Project
SponGES is a research and innovation project funded under the H2020 Blue Growth BG1 call aimed at “Improving the preservation and sustainable exploitation of Atlantic marine ecosystems”. Its overarching goal is to develop an integrated ecosystem-based approach to preserve and sustainably use deep-sea sponge ecosystems of the North Atlantic. Its consortium, an international and interdisciplinary collaboration of 19 European and North American research institutions, environmental non-governmental and intergovernmental organizations, will focus on one of the most diverse, ecologically and biologically important and vulnerable marine ecosystems of the deep-sea - sponge grounds – that have received very little research and conservation attention to date. Over the course of four years, from March 2016 - Feb 2020, SponGES will: 1 - Strengthen the knowledge-base on North Atlantic sponge ground ecosystems by investigating their distribution, diversity, biogeography, function and dynamics; 2 - Improve innovation and industrial application by unlocking the biotechnological potential of these ecosystems; 3 - Improve the capacity to model, understand and predict threats and impacts and future anthropogenic and climate-driven changes to these ecosystems; 4 - Advance the science-policy interface and developing tools for improved resource management and good governance of these ecosystems from regional to international levels across the North Atlantic. Want to know more? Follow us on: www.deepseasponges.org https://www.facebook.com/Deep-Sea-Sponges-1101396993244491/ https://twitter.com/DeepSea_Sponges *SponGES has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 679849