Núria Sánchez Coll

Núria Sánchez Coll
CRAG Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics | CRAG

PhD

About

62
Publications
57,475
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6,646
Citations

Publications

Publications (62)
Article
Recognition of a pathogen by the plant immune system often triggers a form of regulated cell death traditionally known as the hypersensitive response (HR). This type of cell death occurs precisely at the site of pathogen recognition, and it is restricted to a few cells. Extensive research has shed light into how plant immune receptors are mechanist...
Article
Tomato varieties resistant to the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum have the ability to restrict bacterial movement in the plant. Inducible vascular cell wall reinforcements seem to play a key role in confining R. solanacearum into the xylem vasculature of resistant tomato. However, the type of compounds involved in such vascular physi...
Chapter
In plants, the hypersensitive response (HR) is a programmed cell death modality that occurs upon recognition of harmful non-self. It occurs at the site of pathogen infection, thus preventing pathogens to live off plant tissue and proliferate. Shedding light on the molecular constituents underlying this process requires robust and quantitative metho...
Article
Full-text available
Diverse pathogen effectors convergently target conserved components in plant immunity guarded by intracellular nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat receptors (NLRs) and activate effector-triggered immunity (ETI), often causing cell death. Little is known of the differences underlying ETI in different plants triggered by the same effector....
Article
Full-text available
Ralstonia solanacearum causes bacterial wilt, a devastating plant disease, responsible for serious losses on many crop plants. R. solanacearum phylotype II-B1 strains have caused important outbreaks in temperate regions, where the pathogen has been identified inside asymptomatic bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara) plants near rivers and in potato field...
Preprint
Full-text available
Recognition of a pathogen by the plant immune system often triggers a form of regulated cell death traditionally known as the hypersensitive response. This type of immune cell death occurs precisely at the site of pathogen recognition, and it is restricted to a few cells. Extensive research has shed light into how plant immune receptors are mechani...
Chapter
Potato bacterial wilt is caused by the devastating bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. Quantitative resistance to this disease has been and is currently introgressed from a number of wild relatives into cultivated varieties through laborious breeding programs. Here, we present two methods that we have developed to facilitate the screening fo...
Article
Full-text available
Background Cell walls (CWs) are protein-rich polysaccharide matrices essential for plant growth and environmental acclimation. The CW constitutes the first physical barrier as well as a primary source of nutrients for microbes interacting with plants, such as the vascular pathogen Fusarium oxysporum (Fo). Fo colonizes roots, advancing through the p...
Preprint
The soil borne pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is the causing agent of bacterial wilt, a devastating disease affecting major agricultural crops. R. solanacearum enters plants through the roots and reaches the vasculature, causing rapid wilting. We recently showed that tomato varieties resistant to bacterial wilt restrict bacterial movement in the p...
Article
Full-text available
Background Ralstonia solanacearum is the causal agent of bacterial wilt, a devastating plant disease responsible for serious economic losses especially on potato, tomato, and other solanaceous plant species in temperate countries. In R. solanacearum , gene expression analysis has been key to unravel many virulence determinants as well as their regu...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Potato, the third most important crop worldwide, plays a critical role in human food security. Brown rot, one of the most destructive potato diseases caused by Ralstonia solanacearum, results in huge economic losses every year. A quick, stable, low cost and high throughout method is required to meet the demands of identification of germ...
Article
Full-text available
Bacterial wilt caused by the soil-borne pathogen Ralstonia solancearum is economically devastating, with no effective methods to fight the disease. This pathogen invades plants through their roots and colonizes their xylem, clogging the vasculature and causing rapid wilting. Key to preventing colonization are the early defense responses triggered i...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Full-text available
Xylem vascular wilt pathogens cause some of the most devastating diseases in plants. Proliferation of these pathogens in the xylem tissue causes massive disruption of water and mineral transport, resulting in severe wilting and death of the infected plants. Upon reaching the xylem vascular tissue, these pathogens multiply profusely and later spread...
Article
Metacaspases and paracaspases are proteases that were first identified as containing a caspase-like structural fold (Uren et al., 2000). Like caspases, metacas-pases and paracaspases are multi-functional proteins regulating diverse biological phenomena, such as aging, immunity , proteostasis, and programmed cell death. The broad phylogenetic distri...
Article
Full-text available
Twitching and swimming are two bacterial movements governed by pili and flagella. The present work identifies for the first time in the Gram-negative plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum a pilus-mediated chemotaxis pathway analogous to that governing flagellum-mediated chemotaxis. We show that regulatory genes in this pathway control all of the ph...
Article
Full-text available
Ralstonia solanacearum is a bacterial vascular pathogen causing devastating bacterial wilt. In the field, resistance against this pathogen is quantitative and is available for breeders only in tomato and eggplant. To understand the basis of resistance to R. solanacearum in tomato, we investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of bacterial colonizati...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Potato, the third most important crop worldwide, plays a critical role in human food security. Brown rot, one of the most destructive potato diseases caused by Ralstonia solanacearum, results in huge economic losses every year. A quick, stable, low cost and high throughout method is required to meet the demands of identification of ger...
Article
Pathogen recognition by the plant immune system leads to defense responses that are often accompanied by a form of regulated cell death known as the hypersensitive response (HR). HR shares some features with regulated necrosis observed in animals. Genetically, HR can be uncoupled from local defense responses at the site of infection and its role in...
Article
Bacterial wilt caused by the bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most devastating crop diseases worldwide. The molecular mechanisms controlling the early stage of R. solanacearum colonization in the root remain unknown. Aiming to better understand the mechanism of the establishment of R. solanacearum infection in root, we establ...
Article
The hypersensitive response (HR) is a plant defence reaction triggered by activation of immune receptors upon pathogen recognition. It results in rapid cell death at the attempted invasion site, confining the pathogen and sending signals to distal parts of the plant that can in turn activate defences for subsequent attacks. HR cell death is a highl...
Article
Full-text available
Highlight: This review emphasizes the crucial functions of plant proteases during the regulation of defence-related hypersensitive cell death. Abstract The hypersensitive response (HR) is a plant defence reaction triggered by activation of immune receptors upon pathogen recognition. It results in rapid cell death at the attempted invasion site, con...
Article
Full-text available
Efficacy and efficiency of pesticide application in the field through the foliage still faces many challenges. There exists a mismatch between the hydrophobic character of the leaf and the active molecule, low dispersion of the pesticides on the leaves’ surface, runoff loss and rolling down of the active molecules to the field, decreasing their eff...
Article
Full-text available
Bacterial wilt caused by the bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is one of the most devastating crop diseases worldwide. The molecular mechanisms controlling the early stage of R. solanacearum colonization in the root remain unknown. Aiming to better understand the mechanism of the establishment of R. solanacearum infection in root, we establ...
Poster
Full-text available
If you are interested in plant proteases and/or plant programmed cell death, join us in September in Ghent for the 4th Plant Protease and PCD Symposium! Great line-up, lots of open slots for selected oral and poster presentations, and a historical meeting venue promise another excellent conference in this meeting series. Please check out vibconfer...
Article
Finding chemical compounds that prevent and combat bacterial diseases is fundamental for crop production. Bacterial virulence inhibitors are a promising alternative to classical control treatments, because they have a low environmental impact and they are less likely to generate bacterial resistance. The major virulence determinant of most animal a...
Article
Full-text available
Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is a powerful proteomic technique to display protein activities in a proteome. It is based on the use of small molecular probes that react with the active site of proteins in an activity-dependent manner. We used ABPP to dissect the protein activity changes that occur in the intercellular spaces of tolerant (...
Article
Full-text available
Autophagy is a eukaryotic catabolic pathway essential for growth and development. In plants, it is activated in response to environmental cues or developmental stimuli. However, in contrast to other eukaryotic systems, we know relatively little regarding the molecular players involved in autophagy and the regulation of this complex pathway. In the...
Article
Full-text available
The causing agent of bacterial wilt, Ralstonia solanacearum, is a soilborne pathogen that invades plants through their roots, traversing many tissue layers until it reaches the xylem, where it multiplies and causes plant collapse. The effects of R. solanacearum infection are devastating and no effective approach to fight the disease is so far avail...
Article
Autophagy is a highly conserved degradation and recycling process that controls cellular homeostasis, stress adaptation, and programmed cell death in eukaryotes. Emerging evidence indicates that autophagy is a key regulator of plant innate immunity and contributes with both pro-death and pro-survival functions to antimicrobial defences, depending o...
Article
Full-text available
Bacterial wilt of potatoes—also called brown rot—is a devastating disease caused by the vascular pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum that leads to significant yield loss. As in other plant-pathogen interactions, the first contacts established between the bacterium and the plant largely condition the disease outcome. Here, we studied the transcriptome o...
Article
Full-text available
Initially found to be critically involved in inflammation and apoptosis, caspases have since then been implicated in the regulation of various signaling pathways in animals. How caspases and caspase-mediated processes evolved is a topic of great interest and hot debate. In fact, caspases are just the tip of the iceberg, representing a relatively sm...
Article
The hypersensitive response (HR) is a localized programmed cell death phenomenon that occurs in response to pathogen recognition at the site of attempted invasion. Despite more than a century of research on HR, little is known about how it is so tightly regulated and how it can be contained spatially to a few cells. AtMC1 is an Arabidopsis thaliana...
Article
Full-text available
Ralstonia solanacearum is the causative agent of bacterial wilt of potato. Ralstonia solanacearum strain UY031 belongs to the American phylotype IIB, sequevar 1, also classified as race 3 biovar 2. Here we report the completely sequenced genome of this strain, the first complete genome for phylotype IIB, sequevar 1, and the fourth for the R. solana...
Article
Full-text available
Programmed cell death (PCD) is a fundamental cellular process that has adopted a plethora of vital functions in multicellular organisms. In plants, PCD processes are elicited as an inherent part of regular development in specific cell types or tissues, but can also be triggered by biotic and abiotic stresses. Although over the last years we have se...
Chapter
Full-text available
Plants are constantly exposed to a complex and changing environment that challenges their cellular homeostasis. Stress responses triggered as a consequence of unfavorable conditions result in increased protein aggregate formation at the cellular level. When the formation of misfolded proteins surpasses the capacity of the cell to remove them, insol...
Article
Full-text available
Bacterial pathogens possess complex type III effector (T3E) repertoires that are translocated inside the host cells to cause disease. However, only a minor proportion of these effectors have been assigned a function. Here, we show that the T3E AWR5 from the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is an inhibitor of TOR, a central regulator in eukaryot...
Article
Full-text available
Type III effectors (T3E) are key virulence proteins that are injected by bacterial pathogens inside the cells of their host to subvert cellular processes and contribute to disease. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an important heterologous system for the functional characterisation of T3E proteins in a eukaryotic environment. I...
Article
Full-text available
In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring au...
Article
The objective of this review is to highlight the proteases required for regulated cell death mechanisms in animals and plants. Our aim is to be incisive, and not inclusive of all the animal proteases that have been implicated in various publications. We aim to focus on instances when several publications from disparate groups have demonstrated the...
Article
Full-text available
A plethora of diverse programmed cell death (PCD) processes has been described in living organisms. In animals and plants, different forms of PCD play crucial roles in development, immunity, and responses to the environment. While the molecular control of some animal PCD forms such as apoptosis is known in great detail, we still know comparatively...
Article
Full-text available
Background Solanum commersonii is a wild potato species that exhibits high tolerance to both biotic and abiotic stresses and has been used as a source of genes for introgression into cultivated potato. Among the interesting features of S. commersonii is resistance to the bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum, one of the most devastating b...
Article
Reactive oxygen species (ROS)- and calcium- dependent signaling pathways play well-established roles during plant innate immunity. Chloroplasts host major biosynthetic pathways and have central roles in energy production, redox homeostasis, and retrograde signaling. However, the organelle's importance in immunity has been somehow overlooked. Recent...
Article
Full-text available
Autophagy is a major nutrient recycling mechanism in plants. However, its functional connection with programmed cell death (PCD) is a topic of active debate and remains not well understood. Our previous studies established the plant metacaspase AtMC1 as a positive regulator of pathogen-triggered PCD. Here, we explored the linkage between plant auto...
Article
Full-text available
Cell death and differentiation is a monthly research journal focused on the exciting field of programmed cell death and apoptosis. It provides a single accessible source of information for both scientists and clinicians, keeping them up-to-date with advances in the field. It encompasses programmed cell death, cell death induced by toxic agents, dif...
Article
Full-text available
Several breeding programs are under way to introduce resistance to bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum in solanaceous crops. The lack of screening methods allowing easy measurement of pathogen colonization and the inability to detect latent (i.e. symptomless) infections are major limitations when evaluating resistance to this disease in...
Article
Full-text available
Ralstonia solanacearum was ranked in a recent survey the second most important bacterial plant pathogen, following the widely used research model Pseudomonas syringae (Mansfield et al., 2012). The main reason is that bacterial wilt caused by R. solanacearum is the world's most devastating bacterial plant disease (http://faostat. fao.org), threateni...
Article
Full-text available
Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal path...
Article
Metacaspases are distant relatives of animal caspases found in protozoa, fungi, and plants. Limited experimental data exist defining their function(s), despite their discovery by homology modeling a decade ago. We demonstrated that two type I metacaspases, AtMC1 and AtMC2, antagonistically control programmed cell death in Arabidopsis. AtMC1 is a po...
Article
Full-text available
The conditional flu mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana generates singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) in plastids during a dark-to-light shift. Seedlings of flu bleach and die, whereas mature plants stop growing and develop macroscopic necrotic lesions. Several suppressor mutants, dubbed singlet oxygen-linked death activator (soldat), were identified that abrogate...
Article
Full-text available
The flu mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana overaccumulates in the dark the immediate precursor of chlorophyllide, protochlorophyllide (Pchlide), a potent photosensitizer, that upon illumination generates singlet oxygen (1O2). Once 1O2 has been released in plastids of the flu mutant, mature plants stop growing, while seedlings die. Several suppressor mu...
Article
Full-text available
Programmed cell death (PCD) plays an important role during the life cycle of higher organisms. Although several regulatory mechanisms governing PCD are thought to be conserved in animals and plants, light-dependent cell death represents a form of PCD that is unique to plants. The light requirement of PCD has often been associated with the productio...

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Projects (2)
Archived project
In this project we investigated the potential of tuning plant autophagic activity to enhance performance of a plant model organism Arabidopsis thaliana.
Archived project
This project is focused on elucidating the physiological role of plant autophagy in co-occurring with developmentally programmed death of embryo suspensor cells. To address this question we are using Picea abies (Norway spruce) embryogenic cultures as a model organism and investigate cell biological and biochemical aspects of the crosstalk between the autophagic and PCD pathways.