Noreen Von Cramon-Taubadel

Noreen Von Cramon-Taubadel
University at Buffalo, The State University of New York | SUNY Buffalo · Department of Anthropology

Ph.D.

About

92
Publications
21,290
Reads
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2,746
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2016 - present
University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
August 2014 - August 2016
University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
September 2013 - August 2014
University of Kent
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
October 2004 - April 2008
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Biological Anthropology
September 2002 - September 2003
University College London
Field of study
  • Human Evolution and Behaviour
September 1998 - May 2002
National University of Ireland, Galway
Field of study
  • Zoology (major)

Publications

Publications (92)
Article
Previous studies of the prezygapophyseal articular facet (PAF) of the thoracolumbar vertebrae in primates have suggested that the morphology of this feature reflects relative mobility of the lower back, and therefore corresponds to locomotor behavior. Specifically, these studies suggest that the PAF morphology found in cercopithecoids reflects grea...
Article
As a cultural isolate and historically labelled ethnicity, the extent of biological divergence between Vlachs and non‐Vlachs in Southeast Europe is not well understood. Here we present a comparison of metric and non‐metric cranial morphology designed to investigate the degree to which a Vlach sample (n=32) from the Ottoman period in southern Croati...
Article
The evolution of novel vertebral morphologies observed in humans and other extant hominoids may be related to changes in the magnitudes and/or patterns of covariation among traits. To examine this, we tested magnitudes of integration in the vertebral column of cercopithecoids and hominoids, including humans. Three-dimensional surface scans of 14 ve...
Preprint
Full-text available
Human culture, biology, and health were shaped dramatically by the onset of agriculture ~12,000 years before present (BP). Subsistence shifts from hunting and gathering to agriculture are hypothesized to have resulted in increased individual fitness and population growth as evidenced by archaeological and population genomic data alongside a simulta...
Article
Full-text available
Although there are various indices available for calculating morphological integration, the integration coefficient of variation (ICV) is most suited for assessing magnitudes of integration within and between morphological variance/covariance (V/CV) matrices. However, it is currently not known what the effects of varying sample sizes are on the rel...
Article
Objectives Magnitudes of morphological integration may constrain or facilitate craniofacial shape variation. The aim of this study was to analyze how the magnitude of integration in the skull of Macaca fascicularis changes throughout ontogeny in relation to developmental and/or functional modules. Materials and methods Geometric morphometric metho...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives The cranium is generally considered more reliable than the postcranium for assessing primate taxonomy, although recent research suggests that pelvic shape may be equally reliable. However, little research has focused on intrageneric taxonomic discrimination. Here, we test the relative taxonomic efficacy of the cranium and os coxa for dif...
Article
Full-text available
The human settlement of the Americas has been a topic of intense debate for centuries, and there is still no consensus on the tempo and mode of early human dispersion across the continent. When trying to explain the biological diversity of early groups across North, Central and South America, studies have defended a wide range of dispersion models...
Article
Objectives: Written accounts, as well as a previous craniometric study, indicate that migrations of non-Europeans and conversions of Europeans to Islam define Ottoman communities in Early Modern Europe. What is less clear are the roles of migration and admixture in generating intra-communal variation. This study combines craniometric with strontiu...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between age, ante‐mortem tooth loss (AMTL) of molars, and mandibular ramus shape was examined in the context of function‐induced alteration. It was hypothesized that age, as well as molar AMTL, would be significant factors for predicting ramus shape variation in an archaeological skeletal sample from Korea. Mandibles of 90 adults f...
Chapter
Many questions in anthropology can only be addressed via examination of phenotypic data. Therefore, it is crucially important that matched genetic, phenotypic, and environmental datasets are employed to better understand how morphology evolves at both the micro‐ and macroevolutionary scales. Quantitative genetics provides the theoretical framework...
Article
Objectives This study analyzes craniofacial shape variation in the Hehuang region of Northwest China within a population genetic framework, and takes a diachronic approach to explore the relationship betwee cultural discontinuity and biological continuity/discontinuity in the Hehuang region during the middle to late Holocene. Materials and methods...
Article
Anthropologists are increasingly turning to explicit model‐bound evolutionary approaches for understanding the morphological diversification of humans and other primate lineages. Such evolutionary morphological analyses rely on three interconnected conceptual frameworks; multivariate morphometrics for quantifying similarity and differences among ta...
Article
The study of human cranial form has a long history in anthropology. Cranial measurement schemes in common usage today trace their origins to the 18th and 19th century in response to the need for more rigorous and objective means of capturing the major dimensions of the cranium and mandible. Traditional craniometric methods center on the capture of...
Article
Morphometrics is the study of the size and shape of objects in two or three dimensions. Traditional morphometrics usually involves analysis of linear measurements that accurately describe the overall form of similar objects in repeatable ways. These measurements contain scaling information (size) and, when compared to other dimensions, information...
Article
Craniology is a general term referring to the study of cranial (skull) form. Today, biological anthropologists and bioarchaeologists use measurements of human and nonhuman primate skulls (craniometry) to study a variety of phenomena, such as taxonomy, phylogeny, evolutionary processes, and population relatedness. However, craniology has a long hist...
Article
Quantitative genetics is the study of the inheritance and evolution of continuous characteristics, coded for by many gene loci (polygenic) that interact (pleiotropy) in complex ways. Quantitative trait variation is a function of both genetic and environmental variance. The ability of a quantitative trait to respond to a selective pressure is intima...
Article
The purpose of this study was to compare fluctuating asymmetry (FA) levels across cranial modules of normal and pathological cranial specimens. It was examined whether pathological specimens have significantly higher FA scores than normal specimens in cranial regions affected by a developmental disorder. For this study, a modern Thai skeletal sampl...
Article
Full-text available
In the study of cultural evolution, observed among-group affinity patterns reflect the effects of processes such as mutation (e.g. innovation and copying error), between-group interaction (culture flow), drift and selection. As in biology, cultural affinity patterns are often spatially correlated, making it difficult to distinguish between the oppo...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Integration and modularity reflect the coordinated action of past evolutionary processes and, in turn, constrain or facilitate phenotypic evolvability. Here, we analyze magnitudes of integration in the macaque postcranium to test whether 20 a priori defined modules are (1) more tightly integrated than random sets of postcranial traits, a...
Article
Hominoid cranial evolution is characterized by substantial phenotypic diversity, yet the cause of this variability has rarely been explored. Quantitative genetic techniques for investigating evolutionary processes underlying morphological divergence are dependent on the availability of good ancestral models, a problem in hominoids where the fossil...
Article
Objectives Debate persists regarding the biological makeup of European Ottoman communities settled during the expansion of the Ottoman Empire during the 16th and 17th centuries, and the roles of conversion and migration in shaping demography and population history. The aim of this study was to perform an assessment of the biological affinities of t...
Article
Full-text available
The nature and timing of the peopling of the Americas is a subject of intense debate. In particular, it is unclear whether high levels of between-group craniometric diversity in South America result from multiple migrations or from local diversification processes. Previous attempts to explain this diversity have largely focused on testing alternati...
Chapter
Biodistance studies have a long history of usage in bioarchaeology and bioanthropology in order to better understand the causes of particular among-group patterns of biological affinity. Here, using two specific case studies, a biodistance analytical framework is implemented to assess the microevolutionary history of global patterns of human cranio...
Article
Full-text available
The transmission of genes and culture between human populations has major implications for understanding potential correlations between history, biological, and cultural variation. Understanding such dynamics in 19th century, post-contact Native Americans on the western Great Plains is especially challenging given passage of time, complexity of kno...
Article
Full-text available
The transition to agriculture was a key event in human history. The extent to which this transition is associated with biological changes in different world regions remains debated. Cultural and osteological records in Lower Nubia throughout the Holocene have been interpreted as a result of in situ differentiation or alternatively as migratory even...
Article
Objectives: Estimation of the variance-covariance (V/CV) structure of fragmentary bioarchaeological populations requires the use of proxy extant V/CV parameters. However, it is currently unclear whether extant human populations exhibit equivalent V/CV structures. Materials and methods: Random skewers (RS) and hierarchical analyses of common prin...
Article
The “Acheulean” is comprised of individual knapping events undertaken by individual hominins. In other words, it is a particular component of hominin behavior that we draw out and amalgamate into a wider “pattern.” The resultant phenomenon (i.e., “the Acheulean”) is an entity that stretches over the space of three continents and spans a time period...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, several studies have shown that populations from cold, high-latitude regions tend to have relatively shorter limbs than populations from tropical regions, with most of the difference due to the relative length of the zeugopods (i.e., radius, ulna, tibia, fibula). This pattern has been explained either as the consequence of long-ter...
Article
Full-text available
Levallois reduction was geographically widespread during the Middle Palaeolithic, being practiced by both Neanderthals (Homo neanderthalensis) and early Modern Humans (Homo sapiens). Here, we review and synthesize a range of recent work that we have undertaken on the issue of Levallois, with the aim of further considering its implications in terms...
Article
Full-text available
Lithic artifacts are increasingly being used to address questions in evolutionary, i.e., historical, terms. The explicit assumption in such analyses is that lithic attributes reflect patterns of inheritance via social learning. However, both raw material and reduction factors are known to be potential sources of lithic variation. The cultural–evolu...
Article
Full-text available
While it has been suggested that malocclusion is linked with urbanisation, it remains unclear as to whether its high prevalence began 8,000 years earlier concomitant with the transition to agriculture. Here we investigate the extent to which patterns of affinity (i.e., among-population distances), based on mandibular form and dental dimensions, res...
Article
Full-text available
The study of cranial variation has a long, and somewhat difficult, history within anthropology. Much of this difficulty is rooted in the historical use of craniometric data to justify essentialist typological racial classification schemes. In the post-war era of the "New Physical Anthropology" (sensu Washburn, 1951), anthropologists began to analys...
Article
Full-text available
The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) represents the most significant climatic event since the emergence of anatomically modern humans (AMH). In Europe, the LGM may have played a role in changing morphological features as a result of adaptive and stochastic processes. We use craniometric data to examine morphological diversity in pre- and post-LGM specime...
Article
Full-text available
The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) represents the most significant climatic event since the emergence of anatomically modern humans (AMH). In Europe, the LGM may have played a role in changing morphological features as a result of adaptive and stochastic processes. We use craniometric data to examine morphological diversity in pre- and post-LGM specime...
Article
Context: Reconstructing the evolutionary history of fossil human taxa is heavily reliant on the ability to extract phylogenetic information from patterns of morphological variability. However, attempts to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships from craniodental data in extant primates have yielded inconsistent and inconclusive results. Objective:...
Chapter
Inferring the phylogenetic relationships amongst fossil hominins is necessarily based on morphological data. Attempts to reconstruct fossil hominin phylogeny have yielded inconsistent and inconclusive results. Old world primates – apes and old world monkeys – provide key referents for understanding the phylogenetic signal in cranial data. Applicati...
Article
Full-text available
The Neolithic transition in Europe was a complex mosaic spatio-temporal process, involving both demic diffusion from the Near East and the cultural adoption of farming practices by indigenous hunter-gatherers. Previous analyses of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and Early Neolithic farmers suggest that cranial shape variation preserves the population h...
Article
Full-text available
Recent applications of population genetic models to human craniodental traits have revealed a strong neutral component to patterns of global variation. However, little work has been undertaken to determine whether neutral processes might also be influencing the postcranium, perhaps due to substantial evidence for selection and plastic environmental...
Article
Full-text available
The extent to which past climate change has dictated the pattern and timing of the out-of-Africa expansion by anatomically modern humans is currently unclear [Stewart JR, Stringer CB (2012) Science 335:1317-1321]. In particular, the incompleteness of the fossil record makes it difficult to quantify the effect of climate. Here, we take a different a...
Article
Full-text available
Alleged differences between Palaeolithic assemblages from eastern Asia and the west have been the focus of controversial discussion for over half a century, most famously in terms of the so-called 'Movius Line'. Recent discussion has centered on issues of comparability between handaxes from eastern Asian and 'Acheulean' examples from western portio...
Data
Configuration of 51 landmarks used in the 3D geometric morphometric analyses. (TIF)
Data
Morphometric variability (standard deviations) of each of three major groups of stone tools compared across each of the first 22 Principal Components (accounting for 95% of the total morphometric variation). Mode 1 cores consistently showed the greatest variability across all PCs compared with Acheulean and Bose handaxes. F-tests found that for eac...
Article
Full-text available
One of the main events in the history of our species has been our expansion out of Africa. A clear signature of this expansion has been found on global patterns of neutral genetic variation, whereby a serial founder effect accompanied the colonization of new regions, in turn creating a wilhin-pupulation decrease in neutral genetic diversity with in...
Article
Full-text available
Debates surrounding the nature of the Neolithic demographic transition in Europe have historically centered on two opposing models: a "demic" diffusion model whereby incoming farmers from the Near East and Anatolia effectively replaced or completely assimilated indigenous Mesolithic foraging communities, and an "indigenist" model resting on the ass...
Article
Full-text available
A number of automated species recognition systems have been developed recently to aid nonprofessionals in the identification of taxa. These systems have primarily used geometric morphometric based techniques, however issues surround their wider applicability due to the need for homologous landmarks. Here we investigate the use of color to discrimin...
Article
Full-text available
Variation in the masticatory behavior of hunter-gatherer and agricultural populations is hypothesized to be one of the major forces affecting the form of the human mandible. However, this has yet to be analyzed at a global level. Here, the relationship between global mandibular shape variation and subsistence economy is tested, while controlling fo...
Article
This study tests the relative efficacy of human cranial modules, defined on the basis of developmental and functional criteria, for reconstructing neutral genetic population history. Specifically, two hypotheses were tested: 1) The "basicranial hypothesis" predicts that the endochondrally ossifying basicranium will be more reliable for reconstructi...
Article
Full-text available
The extent to which the transition to agriculture in Europe was the result of biological (demic) diffusion from the Near East or the adoption of farming practices by indigenous hunter-gatherers is subject to continuing debate. Thus far, archaeological study and the analysis of modern and ancient European DNA have yielded inconclusive results regard...
Article
Osseous and dental nonmetric (discrete) traits have long been used to assess population variability and affinity in anthropological and archaeological contexts. However, the full extent to which nonmetric traits can reliably be used as a proxy for genetic data when assessing close or familial relationships is currently poorly understood. This study...
Article
The ‘Victoria West’ is a Lower Paleolithic industry from South Africa, which includes prepared cores and has previously been noted to bear strong morphological resemblances with later Middle Paleolithic prepared core technologies (i.e. Levallois cores). Indeed, from the earliest commentaries on the Victoria West, it has frequently been thought of a...
Article
Recent studies have demonstrated that the shape of the human temporal bone is particularly strongly correlated with neutral genetic expectation, when compared against other cranial regions, such as the vault, face, and basicranium. In turn, this has led to suggestions that the temporal bone is particularly reliable in analyses of primate phylogeny...
Data
Description and codes of craniometric variables employed (0.03 MB DOC)
Data
Archaeological samples employed to construct the operational taxonomic units (OTUs). (0.12 MB DOC)