Nora Diehl

Nora Diehl
Universität Bremen | Uni Bremen · Bremen Marine Ecology (BreMarE)

Dr. rer. nat.
FACE-IT Project

About

9
Publications
2,518
Reads
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84
Citations
Introduction
The EU-funded Horizon2020 project “The future of Arctic coastal ecosystems - Identifying transitions in fjord systems and adjacent coastal areas” (FACE-IT) sets out to provide the first large-scale systematic comparison of coastal areas under variable degrees of cryosphere loss. I investigate intraspecific differences of kelp species, with a main focus on biochemistry and population genomics.
Additional affiliations
October 2017 - present
Universität Bremen
Position
  • PhD Student
October 2017 - present
Universität Bremen
Position
  • Master's Student
Description
  • Student lab courses: Physiology Course - Antioxants, Introduction into marine and freshwater algae; Experiences in supervising Bachelor students and interns
January 2017 - September 2017
University of Rostock
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Project: Baltic Transcoast
Education
October 2014 - April 2017
University of Rostock
Field of study
  • Marine Biology
October 2011 - September 2014
University of Rostock
Field of study
  • Bioscience

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Full-text available
Macroalgae such as kelp are important ecosystem engineers in the Polar Regions and potentially affected by freshening and ocean warming. The endemic Arctic kelp Laminaria solidungula might be particularly imperiled and become locally extinct from Arctic fjord systems in the future, since temperature increase is most pronounced in the Polar Regions....
Article
Intertidal rocky shore ecosystems are affected by steep environmental gradients such as fluctuating solar irradiation and salinity along the marine-terrestrial interface. The eulittoral red alga Pyropia plicata (Bangiales) is endemic and abundant to coastal regions of New Zealand and almost unstudied in terms of ecophysiological performance under r...
Article
Full-text available
Geographic distributions of pathogens are affected by dynamic processes involving host susceptibility, availability and abundance. An oomycete, Pythium porphyrae, is the causative agent of red rot disease, which plagues Pyropia farms in Korea and Japan almost every year and causes serious economic damage. We isolated an oomycete pathogen infecting...
Article
Full-text available
The shallow coastal water zone of the tide-less southern Baltic Sea is dominated by exposed sandy sediments which are typically inhabited by microphytobenthic communities, but their primary production is poorly studied, and hence four stations between 3.0 and 6.2 m depth were investigated. Sediment cores were carefully taken to keep the natural lay...
Article
Polar regions are facing rapid temperature increase. In Arctic fjord systems, increased temperatures result in hyposalinity caused by the melting of sea ice and glaciers and freshwater run-off. Additionally, enhanced freshwater discharge and intrusion of nutrient-rich Atlantic water may result in nutrient input in summer. Combined, these factors mi...
Article
Full-text available
Kelps are important foundation species in coastal ecosystems currently experiencing pronounced shifts in their distribution patterns caused by ocean warming. While some populations found at species’ warm distribution edges have been recently observed to decline, expansions of some species have been recorded at their cold distribution edges. Reduced...
Article
Full-text available
The sugar kelp Saccharina latissima experiences a wide range of environmental conditions along its geographical and vertical distribution range. Temperature and salinity are two critical drivers influencing growth, photosynthesis and biochemical composition. Moreover, interactive effects might modify the results described for single effects. In sha...
Article
Full-text available
Phenotypic plasticity (genotype × environment interaction) is an especially important means for sessile organisms to cope with environmental variation. While kelps, the globally most productive group of seaweeds, generally possess a wide thermal performance range, kelp populations at their warm distribution limits are threatened by ocean warming. H...
Article
Kelps, perennial brown seaweeds of the order Laminariales, are foundation species in Arctic coastal ecosystems. Presently, their ability to persist under polar night conditions might be significantly affected by increasing winter temperatures. We assessed physiological parameters (photosynthesis, pigment content, respiration, carbohydrate storage)...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
https://www.face-it-project.eu/ Glacier fronts and sea ice systems are hotspots of biodiversity. Their retreat will pose threats to Arctic coastal ecosystem function and eventually local livelihoods. The Arctic is a harbinger of the consequences of multiple global and regional environmental change on ecosystems and livelihoods: The overarching objective of FACE-IT is to enable adaptive co-management of social-ecological fjord systems in the Arctic in the face of rapid cryosphere and biodiversity changes.
Archived project
Acclimation of different Kelp species to ocean warming, focussing on latitudinal gradients & local adaptations along the Euopean coast.