Nompumelelo Maringa

Nompumelelo Maringa
University of the Witwatersrand | wits

BSc (Wits), BSc Honours in Archaeology (Wits) and MSc in Archaeology (Wits)
Fauna research assistant at GENUS Palaeoscience

About

2
Publications
179
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
0
Citations
Citations since 2017
2 Research Items
0 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230.00.20.40.60.81.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.20.40.60.81.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.20.40.60.81.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.20.40.60.81.0
Introduction
I am an archaeozoologist and taphonomist specialising in Plio-Pleistocene micromammals and the palaeoecology of South Africa. My research focuses on taxonomy, taphonomy and palaeoecology of micromammals. I am working on the taxonomic, taphonomic and palaeoecological analyses of the micromammal assemblage from Kromdraai, an archaeological site located in the Cradle of Humankind, South Africa.

Publications

Publications (2)
Poster
Full-text available
This research investigates the palaeoenvironmental conditions at Klasies River main site using micromammal remains. The micromammal material was recovered from a 110 000 year old layer from the Witness Baulk located in Cave 1. The micromammal remains are associated with rare anatomically modern human fossils. The palaeoenvironmental conditions are...
Poster
Full-text available
This research is based on inferring the palaeoenvironment at Klasies River main site during MIS 5d (115-106ka) using micromammal cranial remains. The micromammal assemblage was recovered from the Witness Baulk located in center of Cave 1, where occupation by anatomically modern humans occurred during this time. Three dominant taxa where identified...

Network

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
South Africa has significant Quaternary fossil faunal collections providing a wealth of scientific resources of valuable information. Faunal remains are core to our understanding of past environments in which hominins lived and our knowledge of the evolutionary process related to the origins of mammals. Such work is instrumental in the foundations of evolutionary biology, taxonomy, taphonomy, biodiversity, ecology and behavioural science.