Noel Brick

Noel Brick
Ulster University · School of Psychology

PhD Sport and Exercise Psychology

About

34
Publications
26,542
Reads
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479
Citations
Introduction
Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Psychology at Ulster University. Researcher on attentional focus and self-regulation during endurance activity. Interested in the role of cognitive strategies and metacognitive processes in the regulation of endurance performance and physical activity. Email: n.brick@ulster.ac.uk Twitter: @noelbrickie
Additional affiliations
September 2014 - present
Ulster University
Position
  • Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Psychology
September 2014 - September 2017
Ulster University
Position
  • Lecturer
August 2012 - June 2016
University of Limerick
Position
  • PhD
Description
  • Research interest centres on cognitive strategies and attentional focus in endurance activity. Current research activity includes an investigation of the use of cognitive strategies in elite and non-elite endurance runners.
Education
September 2001 - June 2003
Ulster University
Field of study
  • Sport and Exercise Sciences
September 1993 - June 1997
University of Limerick
Field of study
  • Sport and Exercise Sciences

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
After more than 35 years of investigation research on attentional focus in endurance activity is still mired by a lack of consensus. Specific challenges relate to the conceptualization of association and dissociation, and discrepancies in methodology, research design, and data collection techniques. This review addresses previously unresolved issue...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: This study sought to investigate the dynamics of attentional focus and cognitive control during endurance activity from a metacognitive perspective. The study also intended to examine the situational factors which may influence cognitive strategy use by elite endurance runners. Design: Semi-structured qualitative interviews were utilised...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: To date there are no published studies directly comparing self-controlled and externally-controlled pace endurance tasks. However, previous research suggests pace control may impact on cognitive strategy use and effort perceptions. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effects of manipulating perception of pace control on a...
Article
Full-text available
Self-regulation reflects an individual’s efforts to bring behavior and thinking into line with often consciously desired goals. During endurance activity, self-regulation requires an athlete to balance their speed or power output appropriately to achieve an optimal level of performance. Considering that both behavior and thinking are core elements...
Article
Purpose: Models of self-paced endurance performance suggest that accurate knowledge of the exercise end-point influences pace-related decision-making. No studies have examined the effects of anticipated task difficulty during equidistant endurance activities. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of anticipated task...
Article
Full-text available
Participation in sport can paradoxically be a source of psychological needs satisfaction and psychological needs frustration. Self-determination theory was applied to explain temporal relationships of athletes’ psychological needs satisfactions and psychological needs frustrations with burnout through a two-wave longitudinal study. Participants inc...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Adolescents with intellectual disabilities are insufficiently physically active. Where interventions have been developed and delivered, these have had lim- ited effectiveness, and often lack a theoretical underpinning. Aim: Through application of the COM-B model, our aim is to explore the factors influencing adolescent physical activi...
Article
Full-text available
In the research concerning rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) in sport and exercise, irrational beliefs are proposed as a risk factor for health. Concurrent to this, researchers have also indicated that autonomous and controlled motivation, as proposed in organismic integration theory could, together with irrational beliefs, could determine i...
Article
Full-text available
Objective In this study, we aimed to understand the self-regulatory processes facilitating optimal experiences in running by integrating models of self-regulation with flow and clutch states. Method Using an event-focused approach, we interviewed 16 runners less than one day on average after recreational running activities (M = 22.17 hours later,...
Article
Full-text available
In launching this Research Topic, our objective was to capture contemporary perspectives on the conceptualization and measurement of human-nature interactions, and advance future research perspectives. The ubiquitous nature of the challenge is exemplified by a diverse and expansive list of countries of our contributors, which ranges among 15 differ...
Chapter
Self-regulation is described as the ability to successfully monitor and control one’s thoughts, feelings, and actions in accordance with the demands of a task. It involves change to bring one’s thinking and behaviour in line with often consciously desired standards and goals. Endurance athletes frequently attempt to control their thoughts and feeli...
Chapter
Expert performance and feats of human endurance – both sporting and non-sporting – typically require the ability to be aware of, and exert control over, one’s own thoughts and actions in order to achieve a desired goal or outcome (i.e., self-regulation; Forgas, Baumeister, & Tice, 2009).
Chapter
“My business is to paint what I see, not what I know is there.” J.M.W Turner Lack of physical activity a major risk factor for global premature mortality and a large proportion of adults aged 18 years and over are insufficiently active worldwide. Therefore, there is an urgent need to tackle the problem of physical inactivity at a population leve...
Article
Full-text available
We have previously demonstrated that reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) is a genuinely time-efficient exercise strategy for improving cardiometabolic health. Here, we examined the affective and perceptual responses to REHIT. Eight young men and women (age 21 ± 1 y, BMI 24.9 ± 2.1 m/kg2, V̇O2max 39 ± 10 ml/kg/min) and 11 men w...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, we explore the aforementioned paradigm shifts and how they offer an ave nue for new research. We first elucidate what precisely “ mental imagery,” the parent construct of motor imagery, is and explain the research milestones that have elucidated our understanding of this complex topic. The construct of motor imagery has become a th...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose Reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT) is a genuinely time-efficient exercise intervention that improves aerobic capacity and blood pressure in men with type 2 diabetes. However, the acute effects of REHIT on 24-h glycaemia have not been examined. Methods 11 men with type 2 diabetes (mean ± SD: age, 52 ± 6 years; BMI, 29...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: Recent studies have demonstrated that modifying the 'classic' 6x30-s 'all-out' sprint interval training (SIT) protocol by incorporating either shorter sprints (6x10-s or 15-s sprints) or fewer sprints (e.g. 2x20-s sprints; reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT)) does not attenuate the training-induced improvements in ma...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the metacognitive processes and attentional focus of recreational endurance runners. The emphasis was on understanding the metacognitive processes important to acquire, develop, and refine cognitive strategies in novice endurance exercise participants. The potential impact of metacognitive processes and cognitive strategies on l...
Conference Paper
Objective: The present study examined the attentional focus and metacognitive processes of recreational endurance runners. The emphasis was on understanding how attentional strategies are acquired, developed, and refined with continued participation in endurance activity. The impact of cognitive strategies on longer-term activity adherence was also...
Article
Objectives Previous research has supported the beneficial effects of relaxation training on running economy. However, no studies have compared the effects of brief contact instructions to alter facial expression or to relax on running economy or running performance. The primary aim of this study was to determine the effect of such attentional instr...
Article
Full-text available
This paper considers the environmental impact on well-being and performance in elite athletes during Olympic competition. The benefits of exercising in natural environments are recognised, but less is known about the effects on performance and health in elite athletes. Although some Olympic events take place in natural environments, the majority oc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Knowledge of demands of different sports is important during the development of training programmes. The aim of the present study was to examine the fitness characteristics of players at an elite level in soccer, rugby union, Gaelic football and hurling. The comparison of the activities is important in Ireland as there are ‘dual code’ players who c...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
There are a number of ways of monitoring exercise training intensity. Subjective measures include the Session Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) method developed by Foster et al. (1995) whereby participants indicate a global session RPE 30 minutes after completion of an exercise bout. But I wanted to know if this is the best method to quantify global RPE for interval training? Are there alternative, reliable measures (subjective or objective) of global Session RPE suitable for interval training?

Network

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This strand of research aims to ‘optimise’ HIT protocols for sedentary and clinical populations by making them shorter and easier while retaining the associated health benefits.
Project
This project involves a unique transdisciplinary team with the combined objective of investigating the benefits of green exercise on health, well-being and mental health. Together the team have shared expertise in for example psychology, exercise physiology, biomechanics and environmental science. This topic clearly aligns with both national priorities (e.g. Healthy Ireland) and H2020 societal challenges (e.g., mental health; sustainable environment). In collaboration with an NGO partner and key stakeholders, the researchers will engage in knowledge exchange, dissemination and outreach activity in order to develop sustainable relationships which from which proposals for large scale research can be planned.