Noah P. Hammond

Noah P. Hammond
Brown University · Department of Geological Sciences

About

13
Publications
433
Reads
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55
Citations
Citations since 2017
1 Research Item
25 Citations
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
Introduction
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
September 2010 - August 2012
SETI Institute
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Made topographic maps of the moons of Jupiter and Saturn using the tools Ames Stereo Pipeline and SOCET SET.

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Icy satellites experience billions of cycles of tidal stress over their histories. Cyclic loading can increase microcrack density and reduce the brittle yield stress of materials in a process known as fa-tigue[1]. If fatigue occurs on icy satellites it could lower the brittle yield stress near the surface, possibly facilitating increased geologic a...
Article
The driving force behind extensional ridge-and-trough terrains on many icy satellites may be solid-state convection in an ice shell with a weak upper surface.
Article
We simulate convection in Miranda’s ice shell to test the hypothesis that coronae formed by convection-driven resurfacing during an episode of tidal heating.
Article
The relatively young, bright grooved terrain covers over half of Ganymede’s sur- face is characterized by zones of intense local deformation [1]. Mechanisms proposed for the formation of grooved terrain include extensional faulting, cryovolcanism and convection-driven lithospheric spreading [2-4]. Lithospheric spreading has been suggested as a mech...
Article
Stereo topography, combined with numerical modeling, provides evidence for subsurface water on Saturn's satellites early in their history.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction: Dione is an icy satellite of Saturn with a radius of 561 km and a density of 1480 kg m-3 [1]. Like many of Saturn's moons, its surface shows evidence of extension, with numerous faults and grabens that comprise the region known as Wispy Terrain [2][3][4]. We measure the topography of these tectonic features to understand the elastic t...
Article
We use crater relaxation as a probe for subsurface temperature structure on satellites of Saturn. Crater relaxation from Cassini DEM crater profiles is compared with theoretical results. We find Rhea and Dione were warmer than predicted by our model.
Article
Over billions of years, crater depths relax at a rate that is dependent on the internal properties of the target body. Thus, measuring the depth of craters can give insight into the thermal history and subsurface structure of terrestrial bodies and icy satellites (Dombard and McKinnon, 2006). The extensive surface imaging coverage provided by Cassi...
Conference Paper
Rhea, Saturn's second largest moon, has a large extensional fault system at 80° E, ranging from 50° N to 10° S. Using Cassini images and two independent stereo techniques, we have constructed a large scale, high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of this region. We will use images draped over this DEM to perform geologic mapping in order to u...
Article
We use stereo images to measure crater depth and relaxation on Rhea. We compare our observations with a viscoelastic relaxation model to investigate Rhea's thermal history and subsurface properties.
Article
We model vertical lunar impacts to investigate whether the formation of the South Pole Aitken Basin excavated lunar mantle.
Article
The South Pole Aitken Basin (SPA; probably the largest in the solar system) is about 2500 km in diameter and up to 13 km deep [1]. Simple scaling arguments suggest that this basin should have excavated the entire lunar crust [2]. However, remote-sensing observations indicate the floor of the SPA basin is predominantly lower crustal in origin [3-5],...

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