Nizan Shaked

Nizan Shaked
California State University | CSU · Art History Departmet

Doctor of Philosophy

About

29
Publications
862
Reads
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65
Citations
Additional affiliations
May 2006 - present
California State University, Long Beach
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • Dr. Nizan Shaked is professor of contemporary art history, museum and curatorial studies, at California State University Long Beach and author of The Synthetic Proposition: Conceptualism and the Political Referent in Contemporary Art (Manchester University Press, 2017). She is currently working on Museums, the Public, and the Value of Art: The Political Economy of Contemporary Art Collections, forthcoming with Bloomsbury Academic.
Education
September 2003 - May 2008
Claremont Graduate University
Field of study
  • Department of Cultural Studies, Sub-plan Museum Studies
September 2000 - May 2002
University of California, Los Angeles
Field of study
  • Department of Fine Art, Critical and Curatorial Studies
September 1996 - May 2000

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
Art and Value: Art's Economic Exceptionalism in Classical, Neoclassical and Marxist Economics reveals the irreconcilable differences between the Marxist economic definition of the term 'value' and its other uses in relation to the art object. It corrects the faulty assumption, symptomatic of a capitalist worldview, that rare or historic objects bea...
Book
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Chapter
Published for MoMA's retrospective exhibition and in collaboration with the artist, this volume presents new critical essays that expand on Piper's practice in ways that have been previously under- or unaddressed. Focused texts by established and emerging scholars assess themes in Piper's work such as the Kantian framework that draws on her extensi...
Book
Full-text available
A critical analysis of contemporary art collections and the value form, this book shows why the nonprofit system is unfit to administer our common collections, and offers solutions for diversity reform and redistributive restructuring. In the United States, institutions administered by the nonprofit system have an ambiguous status as they are neit...
Article
Full-text available
What does it mean to think and act radically, and how does this relate to forms of radicalism connected to earlier moments, for example, in the 20th century? What can be the role of radical art and scholarship under the conditions of late capitalism? More generally, how can art and artists serve the ongoing struggle for social justice and the agend...
Article
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Given that the contemporary art world formed in the 1990s, which means that it was inaugurated as global in the context of neoliberalism going global after 1989, we are interested in this even more specific analysis of the historical contextualisation of the politics of recognition. Our interest stems from the fact that the politics of recognition...
Article
As we classify art practices accord- ing to the paradigms of the moment, and measure them against the recent or more distant past, we are always likely to miss certain aspects of artistic contribution. This is a given condition of reception for histori- cally underrepresented artists like Sonia Boyce, who have entered into the field of art from a p...
Article
This article describes, on the one hand, key conduits between open fascists and the current US administration, and, on the other, the ties of major arts philanthropists to this administration. It reveals the common agendas of the patron class and a liberal world view that hopes to represent the middle class (or the petty bourgeoisie), and that purp...
Chapter
One of the great conceptual artists of the twenty-first century, Terry Adkins (b. 1953, Washington, D.C.; d. 2014, New York) is renowned for his pioneering work across mediums—from sculpture, drawing, and site-specific installation to photography, video, and performance. Terry Adkins: Infinity Is Always Less Than One accompanies the first instituti...
Article
Nizan Shaked describes Rasheed Araeen’s groundbreaking interventions into an artistic system based on exclusion.
Chapter
This chapter takes a comparative look at several models of interdisciplinary conceptualist practices that responded critically to Conceptual Art’s original claims. Artists responded to a limitation they identified in the narrow focus of early Conceptual Art, and turned to the social, the political, and the “life-world,” external to the hermeneutic...
Chapter
This chapter offers a specific set of distinctions made in the debates about political art in the 1980s and 1990s by observing a constellation of anthologies, symposia, and exhibitions as a backdrop to understanding the curatorial agenda and reception of the 1993 Whitney Biennial for American Art, as well as a comprehensive examination of the exhib...
Chapter
This chapter looks at a development within institutional critique as bracketed by the work of Haacke and Andrea Fraser, highlighting their interest in art as a site of social interaction, and focusing on the connection made by Fraser between the personal and the financial transaction. This trajectory nests within two typologies of criticism levelle...
Book
The synthetic proposition: Conceptualism and the political referent in contemporary art examines the impact of Civil Rights, Black Power, the student, feminist and the sexual-liberty movements on conceptualism and its legacies in the United States between the late 1960s and the present. It focuses on the turn to political reference in practices ori...
Chapter
This chapter takes a close look at Adrian Piper’s transition from Conceptual Art to conceptualism, in the context of Conceptual Art’s canonical interpretations. I observe that her contribution was focused specifically on questions of mediation—the mediation of content by materials, forms, and language—later considering the mediating power of race,...
Chapter
The career of Charles Gaines has been dedicated to resisting or attempting to circumvent subjectivity. The political referent emerged in his work not as a means to represent himself or his political persuasion, but as a way to examine the relation of the poetic syntax of visual language to subject matter. A staunch conceptualist, Gaines has been cr...
Chapter
This chapter asks how a precisely articulated set of practices, defined by artists in the 1960s as Conceptual Art, evolve into a broad notion of conceptualism, and how the latter had expanded into its present forms. It shows how, in the United States context, some of the most important strategies of conceptualism developed through the influence of...
Chapter
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Article
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This article examines the 1993 Whitney Biennial, its focus on identity politics, and the exhibition’s position within the methodological debates between Art History and an interdisciplinary Cultural Studies. It identifies where and how the voice of the exhibition came to be defined and observes the relations between the institutional framework, the...
Article
Full-text available
Phantom Sightings: Art after the Chicano Movement. Organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, April 6–September 1, 2008. Tamayo Museum of Contemporary Art, Mexico City, October 16, 2008–January 11, 2009. Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey, MARCO, February 22–June 14, 2009. Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, July 25â...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Museums and Wealth is a critical analysis of contemporary art collections and the value form. In the United States, institutions administered by the nonprofit system have an ambiguous status as they are neither entirely private nor fully public. Among nonprofits, the museum is unique as it is the only institution where trustees tend to collect the same objects they hold in “public trust” on behalf of the nation, if not humanity. The public serves as alibi for establishing the symbolic value of art, which sustains its monetary value and its markets. This allows for wealthy individuals at the helm to gain financial benefits from, and ideological control over, what is at its core purpose a public system. The dramatic growth of the art market and the development of financial tools based on art-collateral loans exacerbate the contradiction between the needs of museum leadership versus that of the public. Indeed, a history of private support in the US is a history of racist discrimination, and the common collections reflect this fact. This book shows why the nonprofit system, understood as third sector or “shadow state,” is unfit to administer our common collections, and offers solutions for diversity reform and redistributive restructuring. A longue durée history of how private collections in city and nation states were turned public, gives context. Since the late Renaissance, private collections legitimized the right of the prince to rule, and later, with the great revolutions, display consolidated national identity. But the rise of the American museum reversed this trajectory and re-privatized the public collection. A materialist description of the museum as a model institution of the liberal nation state reveals constellations of imperialist social relations.