Nitish Narula

Nitish Narula
National Institutes of Health | NIH · Center for Information Technology (CIT)

MS

About

17
Publications
8,624
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1,902
Citations
Introduction
Nitish Narula currently works with the HPC staff at the National Institutes of Health, Maryland, USA
Additional affiliations
April 2020 - present
National Institutes of Health
Position
  • Support Scientist
January 2014 - March 2020
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology
Position
  • Bioinformatician
July 2011 - December 2013
New Mexico State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 2011 - December 2013
New Mexico State University
Field of study
  • Biology, Applied Statistics
August 2007 - December 2010
August 2007 - May 2011
Southern Arkansas University/Magnolia
Field of study
  • Biology, Mathematics

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
The latitudinal diversity gradient—the tendency for more species to occur toward the equator—is the dominant pattern of life on Earth, yet the mechanisms responsible for it remain largely unexplained. Recently, the analysis of global data has led to advances in understanding, but these advances have been mostly limited to vertebrates and trees and...
Article
Full-text available
To better determine the history of modern birds, we performed a genome-scale phylogenetic analysis of 48 species representing all orders of Neoaves using phylogenomic methods created to handle genome-scale data. We recovered a highly resolved tree that confirms previously controversial sister or close relationships. We identified the first divergen...
Article
Full-text available
The rise of informatics has presented new opportunities for analyzing, visualizing, and interacting with data across the sciences, and biodiversity science is no exception. Recently, comprehensive datasets on the geographic distributions of species have been assembled that represent a thorough accounting of a given taxonomic group of species (e.g....
Article
Full-text available
Evolutionary innovations underlie the rise of diversity and complexity-the 2 long-term trends in the history of life. How does natural selection redesign multiple interacting parts to achieve a new emergent function? We investigated the evolution of a biomechanical innovation , the latch-spring mechanism of trap-jaw ants, to address 2 outstanding e...
Cover Page
Full-text available
Vol. 19(3) April 2021. PLoS Biol 19(3): ev19.i03. https://doi.org/10.1371/image.pbio.v19.i03
Article
A basic expectation of evolution by natural selection is that species morphologies will adapt to their ecological niche. In social organisms, this may include selective pressure from the social environment. Many non-ant parasites of ant colonies are known to mimic the morphology of their host species, often in striking fashion [1, 2], indicating th...
Article
Full-text available
The early radiation of Neoaves has been hypothesized to be an intractable “hard polytomy”. We explore the fundamental properties of insertion/deletion alleles (indels), an under-utilized form of genomic data with the potential to help solve this. We scored >5 million indels from >7000 pan-genomic intronic and ultraconserved element (UCE) loci in 48...
Article
Aim The latitudinal diversity gradient is the dominant geographic pattern of life on Earth, but a consensus understanding of its origins has remained elusive. The analysis of recently diverged, hyper‐rich invertebrate groups provides an opportunity to investigate latitudinal patterns with the statistical power of large trees while minimizing potent...
Preprint
Aim The latitudinal diversity gradient is the dominant pattern of life on Earth, but a consensus understanding of its origins has remained elusive. The analysis of recently diverged, hyper-rich invertebrate groups provides an opportunity to investigate latitudinal patterns with the statistical power of large trees while minimizing potentially confo...
Article
Full-text available
The global distribution patterns of most vertebrate groups and several plant groups have been described and analyzed over the past few years, a development facilitated by the compilation of important databases. Similar efforts are needed for large insect groups that constitute the majority of global biodiversity. As a result of this lack of informa...
Article
Full-text available
Determining the evolutionary relationships among the major lineages of extant birds has been one of the biggest challenges in systematic biology. To address this challenge, we assembled or collected the genomes of 48 avian species spanning most orders of birds, including all Neognathae and two of the five Palaeognathae orders. We used these genomes...

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Tetramorium is one of the most species-rich ant genera with ca. 600 described and approximately 250 undescribed species. Many species exhibit an astonishing phenotypical diversity and have adapted to a wide range of habitats, microhabitats, lifestyles, and ecological niches. Based on a RAD-seq phylogenomic approach, in which we analyse ca. 1,700 specimens from around 630 species, we are currently reconstructing the evolutionary and biogeographical history of the genus. Based on that data, we want to understand the macroevolutionary and macroecological processes that have shaped the currently observed hyper-diversity.
Project
Based on an integrative approach of comparative morphology and next-generation RAD-tag sequencing, we are reconstructing the evolutionary history of the genus Terataner. We want to explain how the genus colonised Madagascar from Africa and explore where the evolution of its wingless, ergatoid queen occurred. We also want to reconstruct its dispersal and radiation history in the Malagasy region and reveal which abiotic factors influenced its diversification.
Project
The Global Ant Biodiversity Informatics (GABI) project aims to compile 250 years of ant research into a single database providing distribution information for all ant species. With this project we hope to offer new opportunities to address questions in macroecology, macroevolution and biogeography of Formicidae as well as provide new insights for the use of distribution data for ant taxonomy, species inventories and conservation. At this time, records from > 8800 publications and 25 pre-existing databases have been compiled for a total of > 1.7 M records. Visualization of data is available from antmaps.org