Nithyapriya Boopathi

Nithyapriya Boopathi
IITB-Monash Research Academy · Center for Studies in Resource Engineering

Ph.D. (Pursuing)
Soil Moisture | Passive Microwave Remote Sensing | P-band Radiometry

About

12
Publications
3,707
Reads
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60
Citations
Citations since 2016
11 Research Items
58 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220510152025
Introduction
Nithyapriya Boopathi specialises in Remote Sensing data analysis & modelling. Her main focus is on retrieving soil moisture using L- & P- band radiometer data and developing a model for first of its kind of P-band data. Her research also includes field data collection for the dataset to be used in the model and integrating them to a remote sensing platform. She was also involved in tutoring courses on Environmental Engineering & Spatial Communications for Civil Engineering at Monash University.
Additional affiliations
July 2016 - July 2020
Indian Institute of Technology Bombay
Position
  • PhD

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
It has been over ten years since the successful launch of the first-ever dedicated satellite for global soil moisture monitoring; Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS). Looking towards the future, P-band (0.3–1 GHz) is a promising technique to replace or enhance the L-band (1.4 GHz) SMOS and SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) missions because of...
Article
Full-text available
L-band passive microwave remote sensing is currently considered a robust technique for global monitoring of soil moisture. However, soil roughness complicates the relationship between brightness temperature and soil moisture, with current soil moisture retrieval algorithms typically assuming a constant roughness parameter globally, leading to a pot...
Article
Full-text available
The moisture retrieval depth is commonly held to be the approximately top 5 cm at L-band (~21-cm wavelength/1.41 GHz), which is seen as a limitation for hydrological applications. A widely held view is that this moisture retrieval depth increases with wavelength, ranging approximately from one-tenth to one-fourth of the wavelength. Accordingly, P-b...
Conference Paper
Soil moisture measurement using L-band radiometry is now widely accepted as the state-of-art remote sensing approach, and has been adopted by both the SMOS and SMAP soil moisture dedicated satellite missions. However, it suffers from the shallow depth of its soil moisture measurement, and the confounding effects of vegetation and soil roughness on...
Poster
Soil Moisture Pattern over India using SMOS and SMAP Data Products
Article
Full-text available
Coastal zone is the triple interface of air, water and land and it is so dynamic in nature which requires expeditious management for its protection. Impulsive change in shoreline and submergence of low lying areas due to sea level rise are the solemn issues that need to be addressed. Indian coastline of about 7516 km is under threat due to global w...

Questions

Questions (3)
Question
Can anyone explain this from the point of view of 'Microwave Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture'?.
Question
Popularly known relation between emissivity and angle of incidence is shown in figure. I am able to understand the fact that eincreases and edecreases as the angle of incidence increases. But why is that ev and eh are equal at angle = 0? 
Question
I am trying to understand the Wilheit model (1978) - to calculate emission from stratified dielectric. Can anyone expertise in using that model help in understanding the same? 

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Soil moisture information is essential to providing information on drought severity and extent to support relief claims for drought exceptional circumstances, and to predict likely flow-on effects in food availability. Soil moisture is also an important boundary condition in weather and climate prediction, providing important information on both short and long-term rainfall and heat-waves. Furthermore, monitoring of soil moisture data will afford a greater understanding of the water resource impacts from global climate change and variability. A current fundamental limitation is that remote sensing technology can only provide moisture information on the top 5 cm layer of soil at most, being one-tenth to one-quarter of the wavelength (21 cm at L-band; 1.4 GHz) using the current soil moisture dedicated missions of NASA and ESA. Consequently, this project will demonstrate a new state-of-the-art satellite concept that will provide soil moisture data for the top 10 cm layer of soil using radiometer observations at P-band (40 cm; 750 MHz).
Project
Soil Moisture Mapping using Passive Microwave Remote Sensing