Nina Tupper

Nina Tupper
Maastricht University | UM · Department of Clinical Psychological Science

PhD

About

7
Publications
374
Reads
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10
Citations
Introduction
Nina Tupper currently works at the Department of Clinical Psychological Science at Maastricht University (NL). Nina conducts research in legal and forensic psychology with particular interest in face recognition, eyewitness identification, and role assignment related to multiple perpetrator crimes.
Additional affiliations
August 2018 - August 2021
Maastricht University
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
Full-text available
A considerable proportion of crimes that involve multiple perpetrators. Yet, little is known about how police officers construct, administer, and record eyewitness identification procedures for multiple suspects. An online survey of law enforcement agents in Sweden, Belgium, and the Netherlands (N = 51) was conducted to obtain an initial understand...
Article
Full-text available
Research in perception and recognition demonstrates that a current decision (i) can be influenced by previous ones (i–j), meaning that subsequent responses are not always independent. Experiments 1 and 2 tested whether initial showup identification decisions impact choosing behavior for subsequent showup identification responses. Participants watch...
Data
Experiment 3: Choosing rates (standard error) given previous choosing as a function of stimulus type. (DOCX)
Data
Pilot study Experiments 1 and 2: Mean (standard deviation) age, distinctiveness, memorability, typicality and similarity values for target faces and corresponding innocent suspect. Note: Participants were shown each of the photographs (targets and replacements) individually and were asked to estimate age and to rate distinctiveness and memorability...
Data
Experiment 3: Hit rates and false-alarm rates (standard error) given previous response as a function of test section. Note. Participants took part in two study-test blocks. Sections represent the first half of the first block (Section 1), the second half of the first block (Section 2), and the first and second halves of the second block (Sections 3...
Article
Full-text available
The presence of multiple faces during a crime may provide a naturally-occurring contextual cue to support eyewitness recognition for those faces later. Across two experiments, we sought to investigate mechanisms underlying previously-reported cued recognition effects, and to determine whether such effects extended to encoding conditions involving m...

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