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Nina Helt Nielsen

Nina Helt Nielsen
Museum Silkeborg, Silkeborg, Denmark

PhD, MSc, MA

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10
Publications
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121
Citations

Publications

Publications (10)
Book
Burials from the Late Roman and Migration Periods in the Region of Mid-Jutland (Anthology).
Article
Full-text available
The last meal of Tollund Man, a bog body from Early Iron Age Denmark, has been reexamined using new analyses of plant macrofossils, pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs, steroid markers and proteins found in his gut. Some 12-24 hours before he was killed, he ate a porridge containing barley, pale persicaria and flax, and probably some fish. Proteins and...
Article
Full-text available
Bog bodies are among the best-known archaeological finds worldwide. Much of the work on these often extremely well-preserved human remains has focused on forensics, whereas the environmental setting of the finds has been largely overlooked. This applies to both the ‘physical’ and ‘cultural’ landscape and constitutes a significant problem since the...
Article
Manuring has often been associated with the emergence of permanent field systems, but manuring practices and intensities are rarely investigated in detail. Previous analyses of phosphorus from Danish Celtic fields show that manuring was carried out at most sites, but due to methodological issues and representativity biases, these results have been...
Article
Tollund Man is one of the most famous Iron Age bog bodies due to his well-preserved head. Since he was unearthed in 1950 in Bjældskovdal, Denmark, he has been subjected to several scientific investigations, but until now no attempts to reconstruct his general diet through isotope analyses have been conducted. Furthermore, previous radiocarbon ( ¹⁴...
Article
Full-text available
The layout and development of field systems may reflect significant aspects of prehistoric societies such as agricultural strategies, use rights and inheritance practices. This article presents a method for analysing the developments of field systems in their entirety, based on a hierarchical sorting of field boundaries whose intersections have bee...
Article
Full-text available
Celtic fields are the most widespread type of prehistoric field systems in northwestern Europe. Many questions remain regarding their formation and use, but these may potentially be answered through geoarchaeological investigations. The aim of this study is to contribute to the understanding of the formation of the field systems, the formation of t...
Article
Full-text available
The soils surrounding three Iron Age settlements on South Mainland, Shetland, were sampled and compared for indicators of soil amendment. Two of the sites (Old Scatness and Jarlshof) were on lower-lying, better-drained, sheltered land; the third (Clevigarth) was in an acid, exposed environment at a higher elevation. The hypothesis, based on previou...

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