Nina Lauren Bassuk

Nina Lauren Bassuk
Cornell University | CU · Horticulture Section, School of Integrative Plant Science

PhD

About

152
Publications
53,592
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
2,618
Citations
Introduction
Our lab focuses on trees in the urban environment. Primary issues are: Tree and shrub evaluation for stress tolerance, Propagation of difficult to root woody plants Introduction and evaluation of hybrid oaks Hydraulic conductivity of trees that have been root pruned Introduction of Carya species into the nursery trade Compacted soil remediation using deep incorporation of compost CU-Structural Soil
Additional affiliations
March 2014 - present
Cornell University
Position
  • Program Leader, Urban Horticulture Institute

Publications

Publications (152)
Article
Full-text available
Shoot development of seedling hickories is slow, limiting their success as viable crops using standard growing techniques. Because hickories are predominantly propagated by seed, we questioned whether gibberellic acid (GA) could be used on seedlings to overcome slow shoot development during juvenility. Treatments of one-year-old seedlings of bitter...
Article
Full-text available
While sought after for use in managed landscapes, bitternut hickory [Carya cordiformis (Wang.) K. Koch] remains underutilized in horticulture due its reputation for difficulty with production and transplanting. After learning of issues experienced by growers and observing deformed leaf development of container-grown stock, we examined effects of su...
Article
Full-text available
Background: We present the plant area index (PAI) measurements taken for 63 deciduous broadleaved tree species and 1 deciduous conifer tree species suitable for urban areas in Nordic cities. The aim was to evaluate PAI and wood area index (WAI) of solitary-grown broadleaved tree species and cultivars of the same age in order to present a data resou...
Article
Full-text available
Diversity in tree populations is viewed as essential for protecting the public investment in urban trees and for preserving the environmental, social, and economic benefits that these trees provide. It is therefore crucial for officials responsible for the management of municipal trees to know the diversity of their municipal tree populations and w...
Article
Full-text available
Municipally managed urban trees provide environmental, social, and economic benefits. Continued provision of these benefits depends on the health and sustainability of these trees, which depends in turn on tree managers having the type of information usually found in a tree inventory. The city of Ithaca, New York, USA possesses 7 inventories of its...
Article
Full-text available
Diversification of urban forests is essential to enhance their resilience to future biotic threats as well as those posed by a changing climate. Arboreta and botanic gardens host a wide range of plant material that can be evaluated to inform tree selection policy. This study demonstrates that plant functional traits, such as the water potential at...
Poster
Full-text available
Background and Objectives: Hickories and pecans have long been admired by horticulturists for their superior ornamental features, ability to produce desirable nut crops in northern climates, and resilience to abiotic and biotic stresses. However, their potential as nursery crops is limited by a lack of asexual propagation protocols and a propensity...
Presentation
Full-text available
Yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis) and sweet birch (B. lenta) are taxa endemic to the eastern United States that merit attention for use in managed landscapes. Both species offer unique ornamental traits and are purportedly resistant to the bronze birch borer. Similar to river birch (B. nigra), container production of yellow and sweet birches may...
Article
Full-text available
Rooftop farming intends to diversify options for enhancing sustainability of cities. From a policy perspective, vegetable production and stormwater management are among important goals of rooftop farming for bolstering public funding and policy support. However, crops with high value and market demand like salad greens often have high irrigation re...
Article
Full-text available
Overview of transplanting difficulties of landscape trees
Poster
Full-text available
Some underutilized native trees offer superior ornamental and adaptable features for use in urban landscapes but are rarely available in nurseries due to production bottlenecks. Hickories (Carya Nutt.) are one such group of trees that are frequently sought after by horticulturists and urban foresters. Shoot development of seedlings of hickories is...
Article
Full-text available
Pests, disease, and climate change pose major challenges to street tree survival, and diversity in tree species and genera is widely considered to promote the sustainability of municipal street tree populations. Conversely, the lack of sufficient diversity in street tree population was judged a contributing factor in the death and removal of thousa...
Article
Full-text available
A tissue culture system was developed to clonally propagate a series of hybrid white oaks ( Quercus L.) at the plant breeding program of the Urban Horticulture Institute (UHI), Cornell University. From 2014 through 2018, 34 genotypes and 1966 individual explants of UHI hybrid white oaks were trialed to determine their capacity to establish, multipl...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract. Accolade™ Elm trees were planted in CU Structural Soil® overlaid with porous or nonporous asphalt in 2005. At three separate points (2012, 2015, and 2016) over the last twelve years, root densities were measured with Ground Penetrating Radar to a depth of 30 inches (76.2 cm) beneath the asphalt. Roots under the porous asphalt were more nu...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Hickories (Carya) include many stately, native trees, that offer superior ornamental and adaptable features with great promise for application in managed landscapes, especially urban environments. Immense interest exists in effectively producing these trees, however, due to their lag-phase shoot growth and strong development of a taproot with minim...
Article
Full-text available
T he most recent report of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) painted a bleak picture regarding the loss of forests due to the demands of our food system-from the way we clear land for farming, transporting products and package them for consumer consumption.
Article
Full-text available
Poor soil health is a critical problem in many urban landscapes. Degraded soil restricts plant growth and microorganism activity, limiting the ability of urban landscapes to perform much needed ecosystem services. Incorporation of approximately 33% compost by volume into degraded soil has been proven to improve soil health and structure over time w...
Article
Full-text available
Trees growing in the urban environment are often subject to a variety of edaphic stressors that can lead to premature decline. As a result, soil restoration methods are required. The scoop and dump (S&D) technique of soil remediation is the practice of incorporating large volumes of organic matter (33% v/v) into the soil profile. A controlled green...
Presentation
This is an operations and maintenance guide for the over 500 American Elms on the National Mall in Washington DC.
Article
Urban rooftop agriculture is a growing enterprise in the US with the goal of providing high quality, healthy, locally grown produce for city dwellers. However, air pollution abatement and the purification of stormwater are among the ecosystem services emphasized in studies of conventional green roofs. If rooftop farms actually capture pollutants, t...
Preprint
Full-text available
Root pruning during the year prior to transplanting, with the aim of promoting new root growth, increased root branching, and to elicit a denser root ball, is one technique that has traditionally been used to increase transplant success with taxa that are considered difficult to transplant. For some species, this technique is effective, however, th...
Preprint
Full-text available
Cultural practices that influence the development of the root system shortly after germination can have a lasting impact on the quality of container-grown nursery crops. Standard plastic containers have been shown to promote crooks in primary roots and root circling, potentially leading to girdling roots, and overall decreases in plant quality. Tax...
Article
Full-text available
High species diversity is argued to be the most important requisite for a resilient urban forest. In spite of this, there are many cities in the northern hemisphere that have very limited species diversity within their tree population. Consequently, there is an immense risk to urban canopy cover, if these over-used species succumb to serious pests...
Poster
Full-text available
Many superior tree taxa with desirable characteristics for application and subsequent diversification of urban settings exist; however, their availability is often limited due to low rates of transplant success. Root pruning in the year prior to transplanting, with the aim of promoting new root growth, increased root branching, and to elicit a dens...
Article
Full-text available
Intensive agriculture represents a recent extension of green roof technology. Perceived ecosystem services provided by rooftop farming include stormwater management and the production of affordable and nutritious vegetables for local consumption. However, intensive agriculture can increase nutrient loads to surface water, yet there is little empiri...
Poster
Full-text available
Cultural practices that influence the development of the root system shortly after germination can have a lasting impact on the quality of container-grown nursery crops. Standard plastic containers have been shown to promote kinks in primary roots and root circling, potentially leading to girdling roots, and overall decreased plant quality. Taxa th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cultural practices that influence the development of the root system shortly after germination can have a lasting impact on the quality of container-grown nursery crops. Standard plastic containers have been shown to promote crooks in primary roots and root circling, potentially leading to girdling roots, and overall decreases in plant quality. Tax...
Article
Full-text available
Intensive agriculture is an emerging theme of green roof technology. Production of affordable, nutritious vegetables for local consumption and stormwater management are among the ecosystem services emphasized in studies of rooftop farming. However, intensive vegetable production requires irrigation, which can reduce stormwater retention, and there...
Article
Full-text available
Principles of choosing trees for the urban environment
Article
Full-text available
Street Tree Benefits
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report assesses the soil and tree condition of 550 American Elms on the Washington DC Mall
Article
Full-text available
Street tree diversity is widely viewed as a key component in the resilience of street tree populations to pests, diseases, and climate change. Assessment of street tree diversity is considered integral to sustainable street tree management and preservation of the ecosystem services and social benefits that street trees provide. This paper assesses...
Article
Full-text available
Tree selection must ensure that trees are capable of thriving in the environment in which they are placed. Inappropriate species or trees of poor quality will never develop any substantial capacity for delivering ecosystem services. The aim of this study is to evaluate seven species of Magnolia for their drought tolerance by estimating their water...
Article
Full-text available
The objective of this study was to investigate the post-transplant, root specific hydraulic conductance (KS) of two oak species (Quercus bicolor Willd. and Quercus rubra L.). Q. bicolor and Q. rubra trees responded differently to transplanting across the differing types of production methods. Overall, higher post-transplant fine root KS resulted in...
Article
Urban trees experience site-induced stress and this leads to reduced growth and health. A site assessment tool would be useful for urban forest managers to better match species tolerances and site qualities, and to assess the efficacy of soil management actions. Toward this goal, a rapid urban site index (RUSI) model was created and tested for its...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Woody shrubs provide low-maintenance, attractive cover for stormwater retention and infiltration practices such as filter strips, swales and rain gardens. This 57-page guide details site assessment and design considerations for those practices and profiles more than 35 woody shrub species that can tolerate both dry and periodically saturated soil c...
Article
Please cite this article as: Sax, M.S., Bassuk, N., van Es, H., Rakow, D.,Long-Term Remediation of Compacted Urban Soils by Physical Fracturing and Incorporation of Compost, Urban Forestry and Urban Greening (2017), http://dx. Abstract: 8 On the Cornell University campus a long-term study has measured the impacts of a soil 9 remediation strategy on...
Article
Full-text available
Street tree diversity is widely viewed as a key component in the resilience of street tree populations to pests, diseases, and climate change. Assessment of street tree diversity is considered integral to sustainable street tree management and preservation of the ecosystem services and social benefits that street trees provide. This paper assesses...
Article
Full-text available
Street trees provide numerous environmental, community, and health benefits, but municipal urban forestry programs often lack the public resources to adequately maintain trees, particularly in the time immediately following planting. Watering trees in the first three years after planting is critical for tree survival. A quasi-experimental design wa...
Article
In 1997, Quercus bicolor and Quercus phellos in a New York City streetscape were planted in CU-Structural Soil under a concrete sidewalk and in a tree lawn with the intention of observing long term plant response as a comparative study of an early installation of the new designed soil method. The trees have been measured nine times since the second...
Technical Report
Full-text available
CU-Structural Soil™ (U.S. Patent # 5,849,069), also known as CU-Soil™, is a two-part system comprised of a rigid stone “lattice” that meets engineering requirements for a load-bearing paving base, and a quantity of uncompacted soil that supports tree root growth. The primary component of this soil system is a uniformly sized, highly angular crushed...
Article
Full-text available
In the United States, street tree management and planning occurs at regional, state, and local levels. However, state and federal officials charged with managing streets trees at the regional and state levels typically lack the comprehensive, detailed information available to local officials in a street tree inventory such as species composition an...
Article
Full-text available
In our study, we investigated whether root hydraulic conductance is related to post-transplant recovery. We used two Quercus species that differ in their transplant ability, Q. bicolor and Q. macrocarpa. Q. bicolor easily survives transplanting, whereas Q. macrocarpa often does not. We compared root hydraulic conductance after transplanting between...
Article
Full-text available
Oak (Quercus) hybrids were created using over 40 diverse parent species. The developed hybrids were used as stock plants and asexually propagated annually over 4 years. This was done to measure the effectiveness of a modified stool bed layering technique on diverse members of the oak genus, and this study is part of a long-term project to select su...
Article
Full-text available
This study evaluated a diverse range of oak (Quercus) hybrids for tolerance to alkaline soils, which is a common site condition in urban landscapes that often limits the growth and longevity of many tree species. Different oak hybrids display varying severities of iron-defi ciency induced leaf chlorosis when grown in a highly alkaline medium. Sever...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Planted stormwater retention and infiltration practices are important for reducing runoff and maximizing green space in urban areas. While a wide variety of herbaceous plants are often successfully used in these spaces, they can present maintenance issues because of the need to annually cut back dead foliage and stems. Utilizing woody plants decrea...
Article
Full-text available
SWAT (Student Weekend Arborist Team) is a program affiliated with Cornell University and Extension founded to conduct street tree inventories in New York State communities with 10,000 residents or fewer, a group of communities underserved in community forestry planning. Between 2002 and 2010, SWAT conducted 40 inventories, and data from these inven...
Article
Full-text available
This study involved locating tree roots with a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) system and then examining excavated roots in the same soil volume to compare the accuracy of the GPR system with true root location. In 2003, Acer platanoides 'Emerald Queen' Norway maples were planted in trenches containing two compacted soils (native silt loam and CU-St...
Article
Full-text available
Hydrangeas are popular seaside plants; however, other than in anecdotal reports, there are no studies measuring their relative tolerance to salt spray. We examined response of ten cultivars and one subspecies of Hydrangea representing fi ve species to foliar-applied salt solutions to recommend selections for seaside landscapes. Objectives were to d...
Article
Full-text available
Creating the Urban Eden, a course taught jointly by faculty in Landscape Architecture and Horticulture at Cornell University, is a unique two-semester class spanning the academic year from August to May. Students face the task of creating viable, sustainable landscapes both in theory and practice. The success and sustainability of any planting desi...
Article
Full-text available
Studies were conducted to investigate the severity of cutting back stock plants on adventitious rooting of layered stems and stem cuttings of Quercus bicolor Willd. (swamp white oak) and Quercus macrocarpa Michx. (bur oak). Rooting averaged 77% in Q. bicolor and 70% in Q. macrocarpa layered stems from the cutback stock plant group, compared to air...
Article
Full-text available
Three avenues of experimental observation detail aspects of plant available water holding capacity in compacted stone-soil media designed for urban tree establishment in paved situations. The various compacted media provided an estimated plant available moisture content of 7%-11% by volume, comparable to a loamy sand. Changes in aggregate and of so...
Conference Paper
Maples are an important tree in the nursery industry, and have been a cornerstone in the urban tree population. Species diversity is a key to successful landscape plantings; however, the stressful conditions of urban environments limit the number of species that can be utilized. Currently in many urban environments only a handful of species compris...
Conference Paper
Despite the ubiquitous usage of containers for the production and marketing of woody plant material, little research has been conducted to determine the influence of container size, medium type, medium saturation, and location within the container on low root-zone temperature. In northern regions, growers must go to great expense to mitigate low-te...
Article
Full-text available
In 1997, willow oak (Quercus phellos L.), swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor Willd.), and goldenraintree (Koelreuteria paniculata Laxm.) were planted in the right-of-way on Lorimer Street in Brooklyn, New York, U.S. This was one of the earliest commercial installations of the load-bearing stone-soil blends (hereafter called structural soil) developed...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the relationship of stem anatomy to differences in rooting ability between Quercus bicolor Wild. and Quercus macrocarpa Michx. cuttings. Quercus bicolor cuttings were found to have a significantly greater proportion of parenchymatous gaps in the sclerenchyma sheath over a 9-week period compared with Q. macrocarpa cuttings. I...
Article
Full-text available
Cornell University study shows how manure-based compost has lasting benefits for growth and health of plants.