Nikolay Hakimov

Nikolay Hakimov
Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg · Department of Slavic Studies

Doctor of Philosophy

About

8
Publications
635
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31
Citations
Citations since 2016
8 Research Items
31 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220246810
20162017201820192020202120220246810
20162017201820192020202120220246810
20162017201820192020202120220246810

Publications

Publications (8)
Book
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The study of grammatical variation in language mixing has been at the core of research into bilingual language practices. Although various motivations have been proposed in the literature to account for possible mixing patterns, some of them are either controversial, or remain untested. Little is still known about whether and how frequency of use o...
Article
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This article explores the role of usage frequency in the structure of language mixing by the application of corpus-linguistic and statistical methods. The goal of the study is to reveal that the frequency of a lexical item and the frequency with which it occurs with other items account for its use in bilingual speech. To achieve this goal, I analyz...
Article
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The influence of usage frequency, and particularly of linguistic similarity on human linguistic behavior and linguistic change in situations of language contact are well documented in contact linguistics literature. However, a theoretical framework capable of unifying the various explanations, which are usually couched in either structuralist, soci...
Article
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Objectives Distinguishing between language mixing and language fusion is a non-trivial task, particularly in situations of long-standing bilingualism. The main goal of this paper is thus to propose and test a methodology for discerning language fusion from conventionalized mixing. In addition, we examine the hypothesis that the fusion of unbound el...
Article
Objectives In this introductory article, we advance a unified framework for analysis and interpretation of transfer of overt linguistic structure in language contact situations. Our goal is to demonstrate that fusion, a process whereby results of bilingual practices become grammaticized and conventionalized (see Auer 1999, 2014), is a gradient phen...
Article
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Code-mixing, regarded as a characteristic feature of fluent bilingual speech, has been investigated from various perspectives. This article argues for a usage-based approach to code-mixing as a unified theoretical framework, which is capable of integrating the multitude of existing explanations for this phenomenon and of yielding new insights into...
Chapter
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This contribution investigates the effects of co-occurrence frequency and repetition priming, or recency, on the structure of naturally occurring bilingual speech. It explores, by way of a case study, patterns of insertional codemixing in a spoken Russian-German bilingual corpus. In insertional code-mixing, stems from one contact language (embedded...
Chapter
Full-text available
In bilingual speech, as evidenced by extensive contact linguistics literature, nouns from one language (embedded language) are regularly inserted into sentences framed by the other language (matrix language). When marked for the plural, these nouns either receive plural markers from the matrix language or retain embedded-language plural markers. Al...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The graphics of the birch bark texts produced in Novgorod from the 11th to the 13th centuries show effects of the fall of the jers in the weak position, in that the jers in word-initial and word-medial syllables of word forms are rendered inconsistently, or not at all (Janin/Zaliznjak 1993; Zaliznjak 2004). This project investigates the progression of this process in the birch bark texts as a function of structural and usage-based factors. The data are coded and analysed with respect to the following variables: (estimated) time of text creation; jer position in the phonological and morphological word; length of the phonological and morphological word (in syllables); jer position with respect to the morpheme boundary; alternation of the target form with inflectional forms having strong jers in the word paradigm; nature and frequency of the resulting consonant clusters (if present in the lexicon). The data are explored statistically by using logistic regression analysis.