Nicole Marsh

Nicole Marsh
Griffith University

BN, MAdvPrac

About

113
Publications
33,014
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2,686
Citations
Citations since 2017
79 Research Items
2336 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500

Publications

Publications (113)
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Rates of unused ( ‘ idle’) peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are high but can vary per setting. Understanding factors that influence the decision-making of doctors, nurses and paramedics in the emergency setting regarding PIVC insertion, and what factors may modify their decision is essential to identify opportunities to reduce un...
Article
Full-text available
Background Unused ('idle') peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVC) are those not used within 24 hours of insertion. There is little data on cannulation practices and idle PIVC rates in emergency settings, especially the pre-hospital environment. Methods This was an observational cohort study set in south-east Queensland, Australia using data from...
Article
Full-text available
Background Childbirth is a normal, physiological process, yet intervention is common. Arguably the most common intervention is the insertion of a peripheral intravenous catheter; however, there are few studies guiding best practice. This study aimed to describe current intravenous catheter insertion practice, explore clinician decision-making durin...
Article
Purpose The purpose of this scoping review is to conduct a systematic search and establish the current state of evidence for tools and instruments used to measure self-reported outcomes and experiences, including satisfaction scores, specifically for peripheral venous access devices (PVADs). Methods A systematic search of the literature will be co...
Article
Background Vascular access devices suspected of infection are often removed unnecessarily and frequently require replacement. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence and economic impact of premature, unnecessary device removal due to suspected infection in adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Methods Secondary data anal...
Article
Background Peripheral intravenous catheters are an essential medical device which are prone to complications and failure. Objectives Identify patient, provider and device risk factors associated with all-cause peripheral intravenous catheter failure as well as individual complications: phlebitis, infiltration/occlusion, and dislodgement to improve...
Article
Full-text available
Background Central venous catheters are prone to infectious complications, affecting morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. Polyhexamethylene biguanide-impregnated discs at the catheter insertion site may prevent local and bloodstream infection; however, efficacy has not been established in a critical care setting. Objective The objective of t...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are vital for the delivery of medical therapies, but up to 30% of PICCs are associated with complications such as deep vein thrombosis or infection. The integration of antimicrobial and hydrophobic catheter materials, and pressure-activated valves, into polyurethane PICCs are innovations...
Article
Background The optimal duration of infusion set use to prevent life-threatening catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is unclear. We aimed to compare the effectiveness and costs of 7-day (intervention) versus 4-day (control) infusion set replacement to prevent CRBSI in patients with central venous access devices (tunnelled cuffed, non-tunn...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: To identify modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for peripheral intravenous catheter (PIV) failure among patients requiring intravenous treatment for oncology and haematology conditions. Methods: A single-centre prospective cohort study was conducted between October 2017 and February 2019. Adult in-patients requiring a PIV for the...
Article
Background Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are medical devices used to administer intravenous therapy but can be complicated by soft tissue or bloodstream infection. Monitoring PIVC safety and quality through clinical auditing supports quality infection prevention however is labour intensive. We sought to determine the optimal patient ‘num...
Article
Background: Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are commonly placed with the assistance of fluoroscopy or medical imaging, ultrasound, electrocardiogram guidance, or all the above. Innovative ultrasound technologies continue to emerge; however, the impact upon clinical outcomes is not well understood. In this study, we aimed to compare...
Article
Full-text available
en Aims The aim of this systematic review and meta‐analysis was to summarize and quantify peripheral intravenous catheter‐related complications. Design This systematic review is reported by means of the Cochrane process for randomized controlled trials and the Meta‐analysis of Observation Studies in Epidemiology for cohort studies. Data sources...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Unused ('idle') peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVC) are those not used within 24 hours of insertion. There is little data on cannulation practices and idle PIVC rates in emergency settings, especially the pre-hospital environment. Methods This was an observational cohort study set in south-east Queensland, Australia using data from a...
Article
Introduction Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are widely used, but failure is unacceptably common with up to 69% failing before treatment is complete. PIVC securement reduces failure, but the optimal way to achieve this is unclear. Tapes and supplementary securement products are widely used, however rigorous testing of these to reduce PIVC...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are ubiquitous medical devices, crucial to providing essential fluids and drugs. However, post-insertion PIVC failure occurs frequently, likely due to inconsistent maintenance practice such as flushing. The aim of this implementation study was to evaluate the impact a multifaceted intervention c...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Data regarding vascular access device use and outcomes are limited. In part, this gap reflects the absence of guidance on what variables should be collected to assess patient outcomes. We sought to derive international consensus on a vascular access minimum dataset. Methods: A modified Delphi study with three rounds (two electronic s...
Article
Full-text available
Background: To evaluate the feasibility of an efficacy trial comparing a hydrophobic polyurethane peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) with a standard polyurethane PICC. Methods: This pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) was conducted between May 2017 and February 2018. Adult participants (n = 111) were assigned to hydrophobic polyur...
Article
Background The peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) is the most frequently used invasive medical device. PIVCs fail for a variety of reasons and failure often results in serious adverse events leading to patient discomfort, delays in treatment, increased health care costs and even death. Undergraduate nurses assess and manage PIVCs as part of the...
Article
Background Peripherally inserted central catheter tip placement at the cavoatrial junction is associated with reduced catheter-related deep vein thrombosis . Electrocardiographic tip confirmation purportedly improves accuracy of tip placement, but whether this approach can reduce deep vein thrombosis is unknown. Methods Prospectively collected dat...
Article
Background Critically ill patients in an intensive care setting often require arterial catheters for blood pressure monitoring and arterial blood collection. Arterial catheter failure, which manifests in both mechanical and infective forms, remains common. Dressing and securement inadequacies may impact this failure; however, the best method for dr...
Article
Full-text available
Pilot randomized controlled trial (180 patients) of needleless connector decontamination. Central line-associated bloodstream infection occurred in 2% (1/61) of 70% isopropyl alcohol (IPA) wipe, 2% (1/59) of 70% IPA cap, and zero (0/58) infections in 2% chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% IPA wipe patients. Larger definitive trials are feasible and need...
Article
Aim Evaluate the feasibility of an efficacy randomised control trial (RCT) of paediatric peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) securement to prevent failure without resultant skin damage. Methods A 3-arm, pilot RCT in an XX paediatric hospital. Random assignment of 330 children to receive (i) bordered polyurethane dressing (BPU) + non-sterile foa...
Article
Full-text available
Background: A vascular access registry is a key strategy proposed to improve patient safety and quality, but its impact will be shaped by the attitudes, experience and resources of end-user stakeholders. This study aimed to examine stakeholders’ perspectives and experiences regarding the feasibility and utility of a standardized platform to collect...
Article
Background Whether to remove or retain vascular access devices (VADs) when they are suspected of infection is an important clinical question with no certain answer. This review aims to explore current literature related to removal versus retention of central venous catheters (CVCs) and intra-arterial lines (IALs) suspected of infection in the adult...
Article
Worldwide, there has been a shift in health care delivery, with an increasing emphasis on avoiding hospital admissions and providing treatment such as intravenous antibiotics for patients at home, using peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). However, there is inadequate data to demonstrate if rates of PICC failure are similar for hospital...
Article
Objective To establish the reliability of the application of National Health and Safety Network (NHSN) central-line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) criteria within established reporting systems internationally. Design Diagnostic-test accuracy systematic review. Methods We conducted a search of Medline, SCOPUS, the Cochrane Library, CINA...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) break the skin barrier, and preinsertion antiseptic disinfection and sterile dressings are used to reduce risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). In this study, the impact of PIVC skin site colonization on tip colonization and the development of CRBSI was investigated. Methods:...
Article
Aim and objectives: To explore nurses' decision making regarding intravenous administration set replacement for vascular access device infusions in paediatric and adult clinical settings. Background: Intravenous administration sets are routinely replaced at regular intervals in clinical practice with the goal of preventing catheter-related blood...
Article
Central venous access devices (CVADs) are vital to enable treatment for children with cancer and other complex health conditions. However, complications effecting the CVAD wound are commonly reported. This study aimed to identify the incidence and prevalence of CVAD-associated skin complications current management, and characteristics associated wi...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Evidence-based bundles have reduced central line bloodstream infection rates in adult intensive care units. To tackle peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) bloodstream infection, many hospitals have implemented PIVC insertion and maintenance bundles. However, the efficacy of PIVC bundles in preventing PIVC complications and infection...
Article
Background: US Centers for Disease Control guidelines recommend replacement of peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVC) no more frequently than every 72 to 96 hours. Routine replacement is thought to reduce the risk of phlebitis and bloodstream infection. Catheter insertion is an unpleasant experience for patients and replacement may be unnecessary...
Article
Background: Vascular access devices are widely used in healthcare settings worldwide. The insertion of a vascular access device creates a wound, vulnerable to irritation, injury and infection. Vascular access-associated skin complications are frequently reported in the literature, however very little evidence is available regarding the incidence an...
Article
Background: Skin microorganisms may contribute to the development of vascular access device (VAD) infections. Baseline skin microorganism type and quantity vary between body sites, yet there is little evidence to inform choice of VAD site selection. Objective: To compare microorganisms present at different body sites used for VAD insertions and...
Article
Full-text available
Background The reported incidence of peripheral intravenous catheter (PIV) failure has been as high as 69%. This is in part due to inadequate stabilisation or securement to the skin, which allows micro-motion of the catheter within the vein. Methods A pilot open randomised controlled trial of 300 patients was conducted in the medical and surgical...
Article
Full-text available
Background Peripheral intravenous catheters (PVCs) are essential invasive devices, with 2 billion PVCs sold each year. The comparative efficacy of expert versus generalist inserter models for successful PVC insertion and subsequent reliable vascular access is unknown. Methods A single-centre, parallel-group, pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT)...
Article
Objective The aim of this study was to quantify the utilisation of vascular access devices in Queensland public hospitals and their associated cost.Methods Devices were broadly classified into peripheral intravenous catheters, central venous catheters and arterial lines. The number of catheters used was obtained from a central procurement departmen...
Article
This study was undertaken to calculate the incidence of 8 signs and symptoms used for the diagnosis of phlebitis with peripheral intravenous catheters, or short peripheral catheters, and the level of correlation between them. A total of 22 789 daily observations of 6 signs (swelling, erythema, leakage, palpable venous cord, purulent discharge, and...
Article
Background: Two billion peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are used globally each year, but optimal dressing and securement methods are not well established. We aimed to compare the efficacy and costs of three alternative approaches to standard non-bordered polyurethane dressings. Methods: We did a pragmatic, randomised controlled, paralle...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are frequently used in hospitals. However, PIVC complications are common, with failures leading to treatment delays, additional procedures, patient pain and discomfort, increased clinician workload and substantially increased healthcare costs. Recent evidence suggests integrated PIVC systems may...
Article
Introduction: Many patients are discharged from hospital with a peripherally inserted central catheter in place. Monitoring the peripherally inserted central catheter insertion site for clinical and research purposes is important for identifying complications, but the extent to which patients can reliably report the condition of their catheter ins...
Article
Background: Insertion of a 16 or 18 gauge peripheral intravenous catheter is a potentially painful intervention but one frequently experienced by pregnant women when admitted to hospital. Although the rationale for this practice is 'in case of an emergency bleed', evidence for using large-bore catheters in this population is absent. Aims: (i) To...
Article
Despite vascular access devices (VADs) being vital for patient care, device failure rates are unacceptably high with around 25% of central venous devices, and 30–40% of peripheral venous devices, developing complications that result in VAD failure. The use of tissue adhesive is a novel method of securing VADs and is gaining popularity, however the...
Article
Adult medical and surgical patients admitted to tertiary hospitals regularly have peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) inserted for their treatment. Anecdotally, patients report varying levels of pain and anxiety during the insertion procedure; however, lived experiences of patients are not well documented in the literature. The aim of this study was...
Article
Background: Almost 70% of hospitalized patients require a peripheral intravenous catheter (PIV), yet up to 69% of PIVs fail prior to completion of therapy. Objective: To identify risk factors associated with PIV failure. Design: A single center, prospective, cohort study. Setting: Medical and surgical wards of a tertiary hospital located in...
Article
Full-text available
Background Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are commonly used for delivering intravenous therapy. PICC failure is unacceptably high (up to 40%) due to mechanical, infectious and thrombotic complications. Poor securement potentiates all complication types. This randomised controlled trial (RCT) aimed to examine the feasibility of a la...
Article
Introduction Around 30% of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) fail from vascular, infectious or mechanical complications. Patients with cancer are at highest risk, and this increases morbidity, mortality and costs. Effective PICC dressing and securement may prevent PICC failure; however, no large randomised controlled trial (RCT) has c...
Article
Nurses insert and care for more than two billion intravascular (IV) devices globally each year. A wound is created for each IV insertion, and the wound cannot heal while the IV remains.
Article
Full-text available
Roseomonas mucosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes infections in humans and is often associated with vascular catheter-related bacteremia. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Roseomonas mucosa strain AU37, isolated from a peripheral intravenous catheter tip.
Article
Purpose: Dressings containing chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) are increasingly used in clinical environments for prevention of infection at central venous catheter insertion sites. Increased tolerance to this biocide in staphylococci is primarily associated with the presence of qacA/B and smr genes. Methodology: We used a culture-independent metho...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Research has identified high failure rates of peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) and varied flushing practices. Methods: This is a single-centre, pilot, non-masked, factorial randomised controlled trial. Participants were adults, with a PIVC of expected use ≥24 hours (n = 160), admitted to general medical or surgical wards of a t...
Article
Background: Peripheral vascular catheters (PVC) are the most frequently used invasive medical devices in hospitals, with 330 million sold each year in the USA alone. One in three UK inpatients at any one time has at least one PVC in situ according to the Scottish National Prevalence survey. Method: A narrative review of studies describing the in...
Article
Purpose: To improve jugular central venous access device (CVAD) securement, prevent CVAD failure (composite: dislodgement, occlusion, breakage, local or bloodstream infection), and assess subsequent trial feasibility. Materials and methods: Study design was a 4-arm, parallel, randomized, controlled, nonblinded, pilot trial. Patients received CVA...