Nicole M. Foley

Nicole M. Foley
Texas A&M University | TAMU · Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences

B.Sc, M.Sc

About

30
Publications
13,023
Reads
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776
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2013 - present
University College Dublin
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (30)
Preprint
The precise pattern and timing of speciation events that gave rise to all living placental mammals remain controversial. We provide a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of genetic variation across an alignment of 241 placental mammal genome assemblies, addressing prior concerns regarding limited genomic sampling across species. We compared neutral...
Article
Full-text available
Tree House Explorer (THEx) is a genome browser that integrates phylogenomic data and genomic annotations into a single interactive platform for combined analysis. THEx allows users to visualize genome-wide variation in evolutionary histories and genetic divergence on a chromosome-by-chromosome basis, with continuous sliding window comparisons to ge...
Preprint
Full-text available
Tree House Explorer (THEx) is a genome browser that integrates phylogenomic data and genomic annotations into a single interactive platform for combined analysis. THEx allows users to visualize genome-wide variation in evolutionary histories and genetic divergence on a chromosome-by-chromosome basis, with continuous sliding window comparisons to ge...
Article
Full-text available
Over 20% of all living mammals are bats (order Chiroptera). Bats possess extraordinary adaptations including powered flight, laryngeal echolocation and a unique immune system that enables them to tolerate a diversity of viral infections without presenting clinical disease symptoms. They occupy multiple trophic niches and environments globally. Sign...
Article
The genomes of placental mammals are being sequenced at an unprecedented rate. Alignments of hundreds, and one day thousands, of genomes spanning the rich living and extinct diversity of species offer unparalleled power to resolve phylogenetic controversies, identify genomic innovations of adaptation, and dissect the genetic architecture of reprodu...
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Full-text available
In addition to including one of the most popular companion animals, species from the cat family Felidae serve as a powerful system for genetic analysis of inherited and infectious disease, as well as for the study of phenotypic evolution and speciation. Previous diploid-based genome assemblies for the domestic cat have served as the primary referen...
Article
Age related telomere shortening is considered a hallmark of the ageing process. However, a recent cross-sectional ageing study of relative telomere length (rTL) in bats failed to detect a relationship between rTL and age in the long-lived genus Myotis (M. myotis and M. bechsteinii), suggesting some other factors are responsible for driving telomere...
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Full-text available
Deciphering the timing of the placental mammal radiation is a longstanding problem in evolutionary biology, but consensus on the tempo and mode of placental diversification remains elusive. Nevertheless, an accurate timetree is essential for understanding the role of important events in Earth history (e.g., Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution, KPg ma...
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Full-text available
Bats are the longest-lived mammals, given their body size. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of their extended healthspans are poorly understood. To address this question we carried out an eight-year longitudinal study of ageing in long-lived bats (Myotis myotis). We deep-sequenced ~1.7 trillion base pairs of RNA from 150 blood samples c...
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Transposable elements (TEs) play major roles in the evolution of genome structure and function. However, because of their repetitive nature, they are difficult to annotate and discovering the specific roles they may play in a lineage can be a daunting task. Heliconiine butterflies are models for the study of multiple evolutionary processes includin...
Preprint
Full-text available
Transposable elements (TEs) play major roles in the evolution of genome structure and function. However, because of their repetitive nature, they are difficult to annotate and discovering the specific roles they may play in a lineage can be a daunting task. Heliconiine butterflies are models for the study of multiple evolutionary processes includin...
Article
Full-text available
Through their unique use of sophisticated laryngeal echolocation bats are considered sensory specialists amongst mammals and represent an excellent model in which to explore sensory perception. While several studies have shown that the evolution of vision is linked to ecological niche adaptation in other mammalian lineages, this has not yet been fu...
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Full-text available
Bats are the only mammals capable of true, powered flight, which drives an extremely high metabolic rate. The "Free Radical Theory of Ageing" (FTRA) posits that a high metabolic rate causes mitochondrial heteroplasmy and the progressive ageing phenotype. Contrary to this, bats are the longest-lived order of mammals given their small size and high m...
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Full-text available
Understanding aging is a grand challenge in biology. Exceptionally long-lived animals have mechanisms that underpin extreme longevity. Telomeres are protective nucleotide repeats on chromosome tips that shorten with cell division, potentially limiting life span. Bats are the longest-lived mammals for their size, but it is unknown whether their telo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Bats are the only mammals capable of true, powered flight, which drives an extremely high metabolic rate. The “Free Radical Theory of Ageing” (FTRA) posits that a high metabolic rate leads to mitochondrial heteroplasmy and the progressive ageing phenotype. Contrary to this, bats are the longest lived order of mammals despite their small...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we present the complete mitochondrial genome of the Bechstein’s bat, Myotis bechsteinii. The mitogenome is 17,151 bp in length and is AT-rich with base composition A (27.8%), C (22%), G (16.1%), and T (34.1%). The mitogenome shows conserved gene content and order similar with other mammalian mitogenomes, being composed of 13 protein-...
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Recent molecular evidence has shown that the largest genus of the family Hipposideridae, Hipposideros, is paraphyletic with respect to H. commersonii sensu lato and H. vittatus, both belonging to a species complex referred to as the commersonii group. The taxonomic issues at the generic level of certain species of Hipposideros remain unresolved in...
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Molecular dating studies typically need fossils to calibrate the analyses. Unfortunately, the fossil record is extremely poor or presently non-existent for many species groups, rendering such dating analysis difficult. One such group is the Asian horned frogs (Megophryinae). Sampling all generic nomina, we combined a novel ∼5kb dataset composed of...
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Most molecular phylogenetic studies place all placental mammals into four superordinal groups, Laurasiatheria (e.g. dogs, bats, whales), Euarchontoglires (e.g. humans, rodents, colugos), Xenarthra (e.g. armadillos, anteaters) and Afrotheria (e.g. elephants, sea cows, tenrecs), and estimate that these clades last shared a common ancestor 90–110 mill...
Article
Despite many studies illustrating the perils of utilising mitochondrial DNA in phylogenetic studies, it remains one of the most widely used genetic markers for this purpose. Over the last decade, nuclear introns have been proposed as alternative markers for phylogenetic reconstruction. However, the resolution capabilities of mtDNA and nuclear intro...
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Full-text available
In this study, we report the complete mitochondrial genome of the Greater Mouse-Eared Bat, Myotis myotis. The mitogenome is 17 213 bp with base composition A (34.2%), G (13%), C (22.4%), and T (30.5%). The genome shows conserved synteny with other mammalian mitogenomes, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA gene...
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Full-text available
The acquisition of tissue samples from wild populations is a constant challenge in conservation biology, especially for endangered species and protected species where non-lethal sampling is the only option. Whole blood has been suggested as a non-lethal sample type that contains a high percentage of body-wide and genome-wide transcripts and therefo...
Article
The phylogenetic and taxonomic relationships among the Old World leaf-nosed bats (Hipposideridae) and the closely related horseshoe bats (Rhinolophidae) remain unresolved. In this study, we generated a novel approximately 10-kb molecular data set of 19 nuclear exon and intron gene fragments for 40 bat species to elucidate the phylogenetic relations...

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