Nicolas Morellet

Nicolas Morellet
French National Institute for Agriculture, Food, and Environment (INRAE) | INRAE · Comportement et Ecologie de la Faune Sauvage (CEFS)

Ph.D., University Claude-Bernard, Lyon I, France.

About

135
Publications
47,608
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Introduction
I work on the behaviour and movement ecology of wild large herbivores, to better understand their habitat selection at different spatial and temporal scales. I am particularly interested to understand what lead individuals to move all over their life and the inter-individual variation in movement ecology. I am also concerned by the monitoring and the management of large herbivores, and then I am working on the development of new approaches like the indicators of ecological change.
Additional affiliations
June 2002 - March 2020
French National Institute for Agriculture, Food, and Environment (INRAE)
Position
  • Senior Researcher

Publications

Publications (135)
Article
Full-text available
Context Diel use of forest and open habitats by large herbivores is linked to species-specific needs of multiple and heterogeneous resources. However, forest cover layers might deviate considerably for a given landscape, potentially affecting evaluations of animals’ habitat use. Objectives We assessed inconsistency in the estimates of diel forest...
Article
Full-text available
Macroecological studies that require habitat suitability data for many species often derive this information from expert opinion. However, expert‐based information is inherently subjective and thus prone to errors. The increasing availability of GPS tracking data offers opportunities to evaluate and supplement expert‐based information with detailed...
Preprint
Context The Complementary Habitat Hypothesis posits that animals access resources for different needs by moving between complementary habitats that can be seen as ‘resource composites’. These movements can occur on a range of temporal scales, from diurnal to seasonal, responding to multiple drivers, such as access to food, weather constraints, risk...
Article
Full-text available
Deer are key components of many ecosystems and estimating deer abundance or density is critical to understanding these roles. Many field methods have been used to estimate deer abundance and density, but the factors determining where, when, and why a method was used, and its usefulness, have not been investigated. We systematically reviewed journal...
Article
Accurate heritability estimates for fitness‐related traits are required to predict an organism’s ability to respond to global change. Heritability estimates are theoretically expected to be inflated if, due to limited dispersal, individuals that share genes are also likely to share similar environments. However, if relatives occupy similar environm...
Article
Full-text available
The fitting of tracking devices to wild animals requires capture and handling which causes stress and can potentially cause injury, behavioural modifications that can affect animal welfare and the output of research. We evaluated post capture and release ranging behaviour responses of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) for five different capture method...
Article
Understanding the consequences of global change for animal movement is a major issue for conservation and management. In particular, habitat fragmentation generates increased densities of linear landscape features that can impede movements. While the influence of these features on animal movements has been intensively investigated, they may also p...
Article
Full-text available
Background Holling (Can Entomol 91(5):293–320, 1959) was the first to describe a functional response between a predator’s consumption-rate and the density of its prey. The same concept can be applied to the habitat selection of herbivores, specifically, the change in relative habitat use with the change in habitat availability. Functional responses...
Article
Full-text available
Alpine large herbivores have developed physiological and behavioural mechanisms to cope with fluctuations in climate and resource availability that may become maladaptive under climate warming. We tested this hypothesis in female Alpine ibex (Capra ibex) by modelling annual and daily movement and activity patterns in relation to temperature, vegeta...
Article
Full-text available
The cover image is based on the Letter Behavioural heat‐stress compensation in a cold‐adapted ungulate: Forage‐mediated responses to warming Alpine summers by Paola Semenzato et al., https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.13750.
Article
Toll‐like Receptors (TLR) play a central role in recognition and host frontline defence against a wide range of pathogens. A number of recent studies have shown that TLR genes (Tlrs) often exhibit large polymorphism in natural populations. Yet, there is little knowledge on how this polymorphism is maintained and how it influences disease susceptibi...
Article
Evolution should favour plasticity in dispersal decisions in response to spatial heterogeneity in social and environmental contexts. Sex differences in individual optimization of dispersal decisions are poorly documented in mammals, because species where both sexes commonly disperse are rare. To elucidate the sex-specific drivers governing dispersa...
Article
The timing of birth has a predominant influence on both the reproductive success of the mother and the life history trajectory of her offspring. Because early growth and survival are key drivers of population dynamics, there is an urgent need to understand how global change is affecting reproductive phenology and performance. However, identifying w...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Holling (1959) was the first to describe a functional response between a predator’s consumption-rate and the density of its prey. The same concept may be applied to the habitat selection of herbivores, by considering the change in relative habitat use with the change in habitat availability. Functional responses in habitat selection at...
Article
Life histories are strongly age dependent, notably linked to the onset of reproductive maturity and subsequent senescence. Consequently, ageing is predicted to impact behaviour, through the expression of either mating tactics in males or neonatal antipredator tactics in females. However, the influence of ageing, and the associated reproductive acti...
Article
Full-text available
Studying the factors determining the sizes of home ranges, based on bodymass, feeding style, and sociality level, is a long-standing goal at the intersection of ecology and evolution. Yet, how species-specific life history traits interact with different components of the landscape to shape differences in individual home ranges at within-population...
Article
Full-text available
Wildlife populations are increasingly exposed to human-induced modifications of their habitats. To cope with anthropogenicstressors, animals can adjust their behaviour—for example, by shifting their activity to more sheltered habitats, or becomingmore nocturnal.However, whether use of spatial and temporal adjustments in behaviourmay regulate the en...
Article
Animals exhibit a diversity of movement tactics [1]. Tracking resources that change across space and time is predicted to be a fundamental driver of animal movement [2]. For example, some migratory ungulates (i.e., hooved mammals) closely track the progression of highly nutritious plant green-up, a phenomenon called “green-wave surfing” [3, 4, 5]....
Article
Full-text available
Assessing the evolutionary potential of animal populations in the wild is crucial to understanding how they may respond to selection mediated by rapid environmental change (e.g. habitat loss and fragmentation). A growing number of studies have investigated the adaptive role of behaviour, but assessments of its genetic basis in a natural setting rem...
Article
Humans, as super predators, can have strong effects on wildlife behaviour, including profound modifications of diel activity patterns. Subsequent to the return of large carnivores to human-modified ecosystems, many prey species have adjusted their spatial behaviour to the contrasting landscapes of fear generated by both their natural predators and...
Article
Full-text available
Although inter‐individual heterogeneity in many aspects of dispersal behaviour is widely reported, this key life‐history trait is predominantly modelled as a dichotomous state of philopatry versus dispersal. The increasing body of evidence for dispersal syndromes (i.e. a suite of correlated morphological, behavioural, and life‐history traits associ...
Article
Full-text available
1.Dispersal is a key mechanism enabling species to adjust their geographic range to rapid global change. However, dispersal is costly and environmental modifications are likely to modify the cost‐benefit balance of individual dispersal decisions, for example, by decreasing functional connectivity. 2.Dispersal costs occur during departure, transienc...
Article
Full-text available
Satellite telemetry is an increasingly utilized technology in wildlife research, and current devices can track individual animal movements at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. However, as we enter the golden age of satellite telemetry, we need an in-depth understanding of the main technological, species-specific and environmental fact...
Data
R-code for boosted beta regression (Fix acquisition rate). (R)
Data
Covariate partial effects on the variability of the fix acquisition rate. (PDF)
Data
Tagged individuals per species. (PDF)
Data
Covariate partial effects on the variability of the Overall fix success rate. (PDF)
Data
Trends in observed data. (PDF)
Data
Global dataset for boosted beta regressions. (CSV)
Data
Description of data fields in S1 Data. (CSV)
Data
Satellite telemetry articles published. (PDF)
Data
Distribution of response variables and covariates. (PDF)
Data
Unit purchase and operation costs. (PDF)
Data
R-code for boosted beta regression (Overall fix success rate). (R)
Data
Standardized data collection questionnaire. (PDF)
Data
Satellite telemetry evaluations. (PDF)
Article
We present methodological advances to a recently developed framework to study sequential habitat use by animals using a visually-explicit and tree-based Sequence Analysis Method (SAM), derived from molecular biology and more recently used in time geography. Habitat use sequences are expressed as annotations obtained by intersecting GPS movement tra...
Article
Full-text available
We present methodological advances to a recently developed framework to study sequential habitat use by animals using a visually-explicit and tree-based Sequence Analysis Method (SAM), derived from molecular biology and more recently used in time geography. Habitat use sequences are expressed as annotations obtained by intersecting GPS movement tra...
Article
The balance between resource acquisition and risk avoidance should vary according to personality type, with potential knock-on effects for fitness. Although previous studies have suggested a link between boldness and fitness components, little evidence is available on the behavioural mechanisms mediating this relationship in the wild. Because habit...
Preprint
Full-text available
Toll-like Receptors (TLR) play a central role in recognition and host frontline defence against a wide range of pathogens. A number of recent studies have shown that Tlrs often exhibit a large polymorphism in natural populations. Yet, there is little knowledge on how this polymorphism is maintained and how it influences disease susceptibility in th...
Article
Full-text available
The Western European population of wild boar (Sus scrofa) has increased its distribution over the past several decades, and some populations have colonized areas strongly influenced by human activity. Wild boars are known carriers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria acquired from the environment, and urban populations of wild boars may be more exposed...
Article
The most common framework under which ungulate migration is studied predicts that it is driven by spatio–temporal variation in plant phenology, yet other hypotheses may explain differences within and between species. To disentangle more complex patterns than those based on single species/ single populations, we quantified migration variability usin...
Article
1.When they visit and revisit specific areas, animals may reveal what they need from their home range and how they acquire information. The temporal dimension of such movement recursions, i.e., periodicity, is however rarely studied, yet potentially bears a species, population, or individual‐specific signature. 2.A recent method allows estimating t...
Article
Full-text available
We studied the seasonal activity pattern of the Kuhl’s pipistrelle Pipistrellus kuhlii in eight sites of the Bou Hedma National Park, central Tunisia, from June 2010 to June 2011, using both mistnetting and acoustic bat detection. Pipistrelles were captured all year-round only at water bodies. Captures peaked in late spring and early autumn. Pregna...
Article
Full-text available
Context Routine movements of large herbivores, often considered as ecosystem engineers, impact key ecological processes. Functional landscape connectivity for such species influences the spatial distribution of associated ecological services and disservices. Objectives We studied how spatio-temporal variation in the risk-resource trade-off, genera...
Article
Full-text available
This study aimed to (1) identify the scale of environmental drivers of seasonal movements on the migration – residency behavior continuum in a large herbivore species and to (2) test the hypothesis that the same environmental drivers and spatio-temporal scaling should influence spatial processes in both migrants (long distance migration) and reside...
Article
Full-text available
Much research on large herbivore movement has focused on the annual scale to distinguish between resident and migratory tactics, commonly assuming that individuals are sedentary at the within-season scale. However, apparently sedentary animals may occupy a number of sub-seasonal functional home ranges (sfHR), particularly when the environment is sp...
Article
Full-text available
With the surge of GPS-technology, many studies uncovered space use of mobile animals and shed light on the underlying behavioral mechanisms of habitat selection. Habitat selection and variation in either occurrence or strength of functional responses (i.e. how selection changes with availability) have given new insight into such mechanisms within p...
Article
Full-text available
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint wer...
Article
Partial migration, when only part of the population migrates seasonally while the other part remains resident on the shared range, is the most common form of migration in ungulates. Migration is often defined by spatial separation of seasonal ranges and consequently, classification of individuals as migrants or residents is usually only based on ge...
Article
Full-text available
Neophobia is an important personality trait that allows animals to minimize exposure to threat. We investigated the existence of consistent individual differences in the level of neophobia in captive roe deer, Capreolus capreolus, using an experimental set-up. Our main objective was to explore the link between an individual's level of neophobia wit...
Article
The seasonal activity of the Isabelline serotine bat Eptesicus isabellinus was studied in eight habitats of the Bou Hedma National Park, central Tunisia. From June 2010 to June 2011 two techniques, mist-netting and echolocation call recording, were implemented. This bat species was captured throughout the year but only at water bodies and particula...
Article
Full-text available
Because avoiding predation is crucial for fitness, foraging animals must trade acquisition of high-quality resources against risk avoidance when the best resources occur in locations with high predation risk. Although optimality models predict the distance at which an animal should initiate vigilance and flight, many studies have shown that animals...
Article
Full-text available
Supplemental feeding for ungulates is a widespread practice in many human-dominated landscapes across Europe and North America, mainly intended to seasonally support populations. Surprisingly, little consideration was given so far to the effect of supplemental feeding on ungulate spatial ecology at a large scale, in management and conservation stud...
Article
Dispersal is a key life-history trait governing the response of individuals, populations and species to changing environmental conditions. In the context of global change, it is therefore essential to better understand the respective role of condition-, phenotype-, and genetic-dependent drivers of dispersal behaviour. Although the importance of imm...
Article
Full-text available
Although individuals must generally trade off acquisition of high-quality resources against predation risk avoidance, removal of top predators by humans has resulted in many large herbivores experiencing novel conditions where their natural predators are absent. Antipredator behaviors should be attenuated or lost in such a context of relaxed predat...
Article
Full-text available
Despite frequent exposure to disturbances or threats, some species seem to be successful in human-dominated landscapes. In order to better understand how these species respond to disturbance linked to human activities, we studied the immediate response of roe deer to playback experiments conducted in an agricultural landscape where human activities...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioural consistency is a key assumption when evaluating how between-individual differences in behaviour influence life history tactics. Hence, understanding how and why variation in behavioural repeatability occurs is crucial. While analyses of behavioural repeatability are common, few studies of wild populations have investigated variation in...