Nicola S. Heckeberg

Nicola S. Heckeberg
Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Karlsruhe | SMNK · Department of Zoology

PhD

About

13
Publications
5,445
Reads
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116
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2018 - January 2021
October 2017 - September 2018
Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich
Position
  • Lecturer & Research Assistant
November 2011 - September 2017
Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
Antlers are the most conspicuous trait of cervids and have been used in the past to establish a classification of their fossil and living representatives. Since the availability of molecular data, morphological characters have generally become less important for phylogenetic reconstructions. In recent years, however, the appreciation of morphologic...
Article
Extreme phenotypic polymorphism is an oft-cited example of evolutionary theory in practise. Although these morphological variations are assumed to be adaptive, few studies have biomechanically tested such hypotheses. Pyrenestes ostrinus (the African seedcracker finch) shows an intraspecific polymorphism in beak size and shape that is entirely diet...
Article
Full-text available
Systematic relationships of cervids have been controversial for decades. Despite new input from molecular systematics, consensus could only be partially reached. The initial, gross (sub) classification based on morphology and comparative anatomy was mostly supported by molecular data. The rich fossil record of cervids has never been extensively tes...
Preprint
Full-text available
Systematic relationships of cervids have been controversial for decades. Despite new input from molecular systematics, consensus could only be partially reached. The initial, gross (sub)classification based on morphology and comparative anatomy was mostly supported by molecular data. The rich fossil record of cervids has never been extensively test...
Preprint
Systematic relationships of cervids have been controversial for decades. Despite new input from molecular systematics, consensus could only be partially reached. The initial, gross (sub)classification based on morphology and comparative anatomy was mostly supported by molecular data. The rich fossil record of cervids has never been extensively test...
Article
Antlers are unique appendages. They are shed and rebuilt at intervals, and are synapomorphic for all living Cervidae (except for the Chinese water deer, Hydropotes inermis, in which they have presumably been lost). The antlerogenic process is controlled by a complex interaction of fluctuating levels of several hormones, most importantly testosteron...
Article
Full-text available
Cervid phylogenetics has been puzzling researchers for over 150 years. In recent decades, molecular systematics has provided new input for both the support and revision of the previous results from comparative anatomy but has led to only partial consensus. Despite all of the efforts to reach taxon-wide species sampling over the last two decades, a...
Data
Supplementary Information This file contains the figures of the resulting topologies from all undertaken phylogenetic analyses in this study.
Data
Matrix This file contains the full 1,140 base pair long cytochrome b data matrix.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cervid systematics has been puzzling researchers for over 150 years. For many parts of the phylogeny esults from comparative anatomy and molecular data are in consensus; however, systematic relationships of some taxa, particularly within Odocoileini (American clade of New World deer), remain difficult to solve. This is likely partly due to the inco...
Conference Paper
Antlers are unique organs and the synapomorphy of Cervidae (deer). They are branched, osseous outgrowths of the frontal bone, which are shed and rebuilt in intervals. The fossil record of the early Miocene yielded the oldest known antler remains, which were interpreted as non-shed, because of supposed perpetual skin coverage and the lack of a burr...
Article
Full-text available
The geology of the lower Miocene Upper Marine Molasse (OMM) of the North Alpine Foreland Basin (Molasse Basin) has been studied intensively. However, one problem that remains concerns the different informal names that have been assigned to the OMM units by local workers. Moreover, there is still no general consensus with regard to the precise litho...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Is species diversity un-bounded or is it constrained by ecological limits? Are these limits imposed by biotic competition, or by physical drivers? Do phenotypic innovations release ecological bounds to diversity? These are crucial aspects of Cenozoic mammal evolution and macroecology that remain poorly understood. We try to answer this questions analyzing a functional big-database of mammals using the latest statistical approaches.