Nick Wattie

Nick Wattie
Ontario Tech University | UOIT · Faculty of Health Sciences

About

51
Publications
24,919
Reads
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2,792
Citations
Citations since 2016
20 Research Items
2092 Citations
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (51)
Article
Full-text available
For the past half-century, the Paralympic Games has continued to grow, evident through increased participation, media recognition, and rising research focus in Para sport. While the competitive pool of athletes has increased, athlete development models have stayed relatively the same. Currently, coaches rely mainly on experiential knowledge, inform...
Article
This study examines developmental history data to identify common pathways for elite Para sport performance and contextualizes these findings using known models of athlete development (e.g., the Developmental Model of Sport Participation, Côté, 1999). Seventy-three Canadian wheelchair basketball players completed a modified version of the Developme...
Article
Though the existence of Relative Age Effects (RAEs) has been documented through a multitude of studies spanning various sports and levels of play, application of solutions related to RAEs has been limited. In this review, the strengths and weaknesses of various proposed solutions to RAEs in youth sport are considered. Our objective was to identify,...
Article
Full-text available
The development of the field of sport expertise over the past 20 years has been remarkable, and our understanding of the varying factors affecting athlete development and motor skill acquisition has expanded considerably. Recently, there has been a push toward more sophisticated research designs to continue the advancement of our understanding of s...
Article
This study examined the emergence and existence of relative age effects (RAEs) among American-born Major League Baseball (MLB) players participating between the 1871 and 2014 seasons (N = 16,122). This study also investigated a range of possible moderators of these effects (i.e., handedness, position, career length, and debut age). Overall, a signi...
Article
Inconsistencies in community size effects found between and within countries1–3 suggest population size may not be an accurate predictor of athlete development, and that other proxies of early environmental characteristics are needed. Researchers have begun to explore the influence of population density and proximity to local sport clubs on athlete...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Talent identification (TID) programs are an integral part of the selection process for elite-level athletes. While many sport organizations utilize TID programs, there does not seem to be a clear set of variables that consistently predict future success. Objective: This review aims to synthesize longitudinal and retrospective studies...
Article
Full-text available
While factors such as genetics may mediate the relationship between height and mortality, evidence suggests that larger body size may be an important risk indicator of reduced lifespan longevity in particular. This study critically examined this relationship in professional basketball players. We examined living and deceased players who have played...
Article
The past few decades have seen a significant change in the delivery of sport and in trends related to athlete development. However, the notion of talent continues to play a critical role in most athlete development models. In this brief review, we highlight concerns with the notion of talent and how it is conceptualized in high performance sport sy...
Article
Full-text available
Considering the growth in research, examining the development of mainstream sport athletes over the past two decades, studies examining development of athletes with disabilities have been surprisingly limited. While similarities in developmental trajectories between the two cohorts may exist regarding factors such as the value of practice, which te...
Article
The community size effect (or birthplace effect) suggests that high-performance athletes are less likely to emerge from regions with population sizes that are very small or very large. However, previous research on elite Canadian ice hockey players has not considered the influence of intra-national regional variation of population distributions wit...
Article
Full-text available
Selection biases based on the use of cutoff dates and the timing of athletes' birthdates have been termed relative age effects. These effects have been shown to differentially affect individuals involved in sport. For example, young male soccer players born early in their age group are overrepresented in elite teams while studies in adult soccer in...
Article
Full-text available
Compared with mainstream sport athletes, relatively little is known regarding the factors affecting the development of athletes with a disability. Sport-specific training programs are essential to athletes’ successful performance; to create appropriate programs and strategies, a clear understanding of the nuances of development of athletes with a d...
Conference Paper
There is some evidence that participating in a broad range of sporting activities can reduce the number of hours of sport-specific training required to reach elite level performance in sport (Baker, Côté, & Abernethy, 2003). However, research investigating the influence of mainstream sport experience on parasport athletes’ development is scarce. Th...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Relative age effects (RAEs) typically favour older members within a cohort; however, research suggests that younger players may experience some long-term advantages, such as longer career length. The purposes of this study were to replicate previous findings on RAEs among National Hockey League (NHL) ice hockey players, National Basket...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives To examine the precocity-longevity (P-L) effect in North American professional basketball players who debuted between 1946 and 1979, and to determine whether playing position and decade of play influenced the relationship between age of career achievements and life span. Methods A total of 1852 players were evaluated from a recognized s...
Article
The current state of research on relative age effects in basketball shows an uneven picture. These mixed results might be caused by the interaction of constituent year and within-year effects. Our aim was to examine constituent and within-1-year effects in elite German youth basketball. The sample (n = 4400) included players competing in the JBBL (...
Poster
Full-text available
Gagné (1985) postulated talent is result of individual’s ability to optimize on personal aptitudes by developing domain-specific skills through training. Current literature suggests coaches perceive physical precocity as talent, which may increase the probability of precocious athletes advancing in their sporting career and foster more opportunitie...
Article
The objective of the study was to examine mortality trends and causes of death among professional athletes from the four major sports in North America who died during their playing careers. 205 deceased athletes who were registered as active when they died from the National Basketball Association (NBA), National Football League (NFL), National Hock...
Article
Virtual realities offer a safe and repeatable learning environment, which is optimal for skills that are difficult to replicate in real-world settings. Previous research has demonstrated transfer of motor skill between basketball and darts but not of perceptual performance (Rienhoff et al., 2013). Our study considered the transferability of a speci...
Poster
Numerous studies have focused on able-bodied athlete development and expertise (e.g., Memmert, Baker, & Claudia Bertsch, 2010; Baker & Horton, 2004; Baker & Cote, 2003). Unfortunately, the same degree of attention has not been given to Para sport athletes (Campbell & Jones, 2000). The majority of studies that have examined Para sport have focused o...
Article
The policies that dictate the participation structure of many youth sport systems involve the use of a set selection date (e.g. 31 December), which invariably produces relative age differences between those within the selection year (e.g. 1 January to 31 December). Those born early in the selection year (e.g. January) are relatively older-by as muc...
Article
The aim of the current study was to explore relative age's influence on physical and motor tests among fourth grade children (9 to 10 years) from Germany. Data from 1218 children (49% female) who had performed the German Motor Ability Test (Bos et al., 2009) were analysed. The test battery, which was comprised of physical and motor tests, included...
Article
Abstract Relative age describes a youth's age within their age group cohort. Compared to relatively younger peers, relatively older youth in an annual age group cohort have been found more likely to be selected to sports teams, and to receive higher grades in education. This study examined the influence of youth sport participants' relative age on...
Article
The relative age effect suggests that athletes born in the first two quartiles of a given selection year experience a selection advantage and therefore a greater opportunity for success. We describe two studies examining the relationship between relative age, competition level, and dropout rates of Ontario Minor Hockey Association male ice-hockey p...
Article
Full-text available
In this manuscript we argue for a broader use of the term 'relative age effect' due to the influence of varying development policies on the development of sport expertise. Two studies are presented on basis of data from Schorer, et al. [1]. The first showed clear 'constant year effects' in the German handball talent development system. A shift in y...
Article
While relating one's birthdate with health and development may sound like astrology, researchers in a range of fields (e.g. education, medicine, sport) have consistently demonstrated that this seemingly innocuous characteristic affects a host of developmental outcomes. One mechanism of this effect is 'relative age', more specifically, one's age rel...
Article
Objective: Research has highlighted several negative consequences for individuals born in the later part of the academic year, including increased likelihood of being diagnosed with learning disabilities. In this study, we considered whether birthdate predicted ADHD symptomatology using two well known mechanisms, the relative age effect (RAE) and...
Article
Within education and sport a ubiquitous policy, annual age grouping, is used to group youths into one year cohorts using a cut-off date. Those born early in the selection year can be up to 12 months older than their cohort peers, a phenomena termed 'relative age' differences. Relative age differences have been implicated with a number of short and...
Article
One consistently reported influence on athlete development is relative age (i.e., one's age compared to others in a cohort). Relative age effects are grounded in the notion that sport selection systems choose athletes based on maturational characteristics and that once chosen, these athletes are placed in superior developmental environments. The pu...
Article
To examine if chronological age within Canadian youth ice hockey's 2-year age bands influences the proportion of injury. Retrospective secondary data analyses. Information on 4736 injured youth ice hockey players (10-15 years old) reported by the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting Prevention Program (CHIRPP) and 4959 (12-15 years old) injured play...
Article
Researchers are only beginning to understand how contextual variables such as date of birth and birthplace affect the development of elite athletes. This article considers the generality of birthplace and date-of-birth effects in varying sport contexts. The Study 1 examined how environmental factors associated with an athlete's date-of-birth and si...
Article
Relative age effects (RAEs; R. H. Barnsley, A. H. Thompson, & P. E. Barnsley, 1985) convey school attainment (dis)advantages depending on whether one is relatively older or younger within annually age-grouped cohorts. In the present study, the authors examined the pervasiveness of RAEs by examining (a) attainment in 4 secondary school subjects, (b)...
Article
Relative age effects (RAEs), reflecting observed inequalities in participation and attainment as a result of annual age-grouping policies in youth sport, are common in most team sports. The aims of this study were to determine if and when RAEs become apparent in Rugby League, determine how influential variables (e.g., gender) lead and clarify wheth...
Article
Full-text available
Annual age-grouping is a common organizational strategy in sport. However, such a strategy appears to promote relative age effects (RAEs). RAEs refer both to the immediate participation and long-term attainment constraints in sport, occurring as a result of chronological age and associated physical (e.g. height) differences as well as selection pra...
Article
Full-text available
Annual age-grouping is a common organizational strategy in sport. However, such a strategy appears to promote relative age effects (RAEs). RAEs refer both to the immediate participation and long-term attainment constraints in sport, occurring as a result of chronological age and associated physical (e.g. height) differences as well as selection pra...
Article
When athletes are placed into annual age groups to organize and coordinate sport participation, certain (dis)advantages occur as a result of the subtle age differences within these groups. These differences, termed "relative age effects", have been consistently related to youth and adult sport attainment. However, there has been a lack of consisten...
Article
The contexts of prenatal life, such as one's season of birth, have been shown to influence health later in life. For example, research has shown a disproportionate number of schizophrenic patients are born during the late winter and early spring. The purpose of this study was to examine season of birth as a possible risk for overweight and obesity....
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between relative age and injury prevalence in Canadian youth ice hockey. In study 1, youth ice hockey-related injuries (among children 10-15 years of age) collected by the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program between 1995 and 2002 were analyzed. The relative ages of...
Article
The relative age effect (RAE) shows that the older one is relative to one's peers in the same grouping or junior sport team the greater the probability of eventually becoming an elite athlete. The present study tracked the existence of the RAE among elite male and female Canadian ice hockey players and investigated the relationship between relative...

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