Nick Palfreyman

Nick Palfreyman
University of Central Lancashire | UCLAN · International Institute for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies (iSLanDS)

About

15
Publications
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Introduction
Nick is a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Research Fellow ("Patterns of variation and local identities in Indonesian sign language varieties", 2016-19). His interest in varieties of Indonesian Sign Language (BISINDO) and those who use them has led to research on sociolinguistics and linguistic typology. He has recently been examining how deaf Indonesians use language to construct social identities, exploiting variation to generate social meaning. Nick has made regular fieldtrips to Indonesia to share knowledge and skills with indigenous signers, with the aim of empowering sign community members to conduct research on their own language. In 2014 he established PUPET, a small research centre based in Java run by local deaf consultants, to create a continuous local research presence.

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
This article sets out a conceptual framework and typology of modality effects in the comparison of signed and spoken languages. This is essential for a theory of cross-modal typology. We distinguish between relative modality effects, where a linguistic structure is markedly more common in one modality than in the other, and absolute modality effect...
Article
Until now there has been no robust (socio)linguistic documentation of urban sign language varieties in Indonesia, and given the size of the Indonesian archipelago, it might be expected that these varieties are very different from each other. In this kind of situation, sign linguists have often applied lexicostatistical methods, but two such studies...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Bahasa Isyarat Indonesia (BISINDO) has been used for around 60 years, and emerged naturally in the Indonesian deaf community. BISINDO is a distinct language with its own lexicon and grammar, which is different to Bahasa Indonesia, and is used in urban centres across Indonesia. Although there has been little research on BISINDO to date, the research...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Bahasa Isyarat Indonesia (BISINDO) is one of hundreds of sign languages used around the world, and has emerged naturally in Indonesia over the last 60 years or so. BISINDO is a different language to Bahasa Indonesia, and has its own lexicon and grammar. There is little awareness of the linguistic status of sign languages, even among linguists of sp...
Chapter
Full-text available
As more research is conducted on sign language variation, it is becoming clear that the semantic domain of colour terms often exhibits lexical variation cross-linguistically. This chapter is concerned with Indonesian Sign Language varieties, which also exhibit phonological and lexical variation in the semantic domain of colour terms. The findings a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Makalah ini memperkenalkan studi bahasa isyarat dan komunitas tuli di Indonesia dengan pendekatan berdasarkan hak, beserta dengan diskusi tentang bagaimana orang tuli dan budayanya dipengaruhi oleh hak linguistik. Riset terhadap bahasa isyarat dan komunitas tuli di Indonesia baru saja mulai, dan para peneliti linguistik di seluruh Indonesia didoron...
Chapter
This chapter introduces readers to the field of sign language typology, which undertakes systematic comparisons of linguistic structures in different sign languages to assess cross-linguistic variation. The underlying aim of typology is to chart linguistic diversity by identifying patterns of variation and language universals (characteristics that...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents findings from a corpus-based study of grammatical expressions of completion in the urban sign language varieties of Solo and Makassar. In both varieties, the completive aspect can be marked by at least four particles, which may cliticise, and also by silent imitation of the lip pattern of a spoken language word (mouthings). Thes...
Article
This paper considers lexical and morphosyntactic variation in Indonesian sign language. Findings are presented from the first part of a contrastive analysis of the sign language varieties used by deaf communities in two optimally-distinct locations in Indonesia. Since the work of Tervoort (1953) and Stokoe (1960), the attention that has been given...