Nick Harvey

Nick Harvey
University of Adelaide · Department of Geography, Environment and Population

Doctor of Philosophy, Master of Planning, Bachelor of Arts (1st Class Hons), Bachelor of Education

About

200
Publications
30,466
Reads
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3,459
Citations
Citations since 2016
22 Research Items
1437 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Additional affiliations
January 1992 - August 2015
University of Adelaide
Position
  • Professor (Full)

Publications

Publications (200)
Article
Coastal Natural Resources Management (NRM) is a distinct sector in Australia with a focus on biodiversity conservation. It is a sector worthy of scrutiny because coastal and marine environments are arguably more complex and dynamic than their terrestrial counterparts thus creating more diverse challenges for managers. Land tenure at the coast in Au...
Book
Full-text available
Australians hold a deep affinity for our oceans and coasts. These areas are beautiful, diverse, complex places that work in synchronicity with each other. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have known this for thousands of years, speaking of Land and Sea Country as an interconnected whole, rather than as separate ecosystems. This is what...
Article
The Murray–Darling Basin is the largest river system in Australia to enter the sea. Prior to regulation of water flows, the Murray Mouth remained open to the sea even during droughts. An open mouth assists in sustaining the ecology of a Ramsar listed wetland and enables the flushing of salt, nutrients, and suspended sediments to the sea. Constructi...
Article
The vulnerability of private coastal properties is a global issue which has arisen largely because of a lack of understanding of coastal processes. In some countries where government authorities have a long history of funding private property protection works the sustainability and ethics of policies have been questioned together with debate over p...
Article
Recent coastal legislative and policy reform in Australia reflects the changing focus of coastal management studies in the international scientific literature indicating a move towards systems perspectives, cross-boundary management strategies and an integration of marine and terrestrial environments. Significant global and national reports on inte...
Chapter
This is a chapter in a book of coastal photographs that each tell a coastal story. The photos from various parts of the world (mostly Australia) are accompanied by text.
Article
This paper reviews the history of the geography discipline in the tertiary institutions in South Australia plus its declining popularity in secondary schools.
Article
The most recent assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change confirms the importance of adaptation strategies such as ‘retreat, accommodate or protect’ but emphasizes the significance of institutional and governance structures in decision-making. Even without the threat of climate change there is a legacy of vulnerable coastal develo...
Article
Full-text available
The global expansion of wind-generated power has resulted in a rapid proliferation of both onshore and offshore wind farms, particularly in Europe. Australia like the rest of the world has experienced a rapid increase in wind power over the last decade but unlike Europe, its coastal wind farms are all located onshore mostly in the southern part of...
Article
Bird Island, at the oceanic outlet of Australia's largest exoreic river system, the Murray-Darling, did not exist before 1940. Originally, flood tidal sediments were moulded by tides, waves, wind, and river flows in the back-barrier lagoon, landward of the migrating River Murray Mouth. The estuary was fluvially dominated, and the terminal lakes wer...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change risks to the coast and coastal developments have been well-documented. In spite of these warnings, new coastal developments are still proposed and built. Australian research has demonstrated how State-level planning documents fail to incorporate recent sea-level rise projections, with researchers demanding more responsiveness to coas...
Article
Over the last 20 years the intergovernmental panel on climate change has produced a number of assessments on global climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability. In 2009, the Australian government conducted its own assessment of climate change risks to the Australian coast. In South Australia, there has been progress in actions to address i...
Article
Full-text available
Social learning can be a vital tool in assisting communities to adapt to change. Local governments can be a conduit between the communities they serve and the policy that they are trying to implement. Social learning in this context can be an iterative, often organic process. Based on a case study of coastal planning in South Australia, Australia,...
Article
Thousands of kilometres of coastal residential waterways have been constructed across the globe, mostly in estuaries. These have caused significant environmental impact demonstrating a need for proper management and planning informed by science. Additional potential impacts of climate change, specifically sea-level rise, make coastal residential wa...
Article
Full-text available
Australia's coastal environments are exposed to great pressures. Adequate policy and management measures are required to ensure the protection of coastal assets now and for future generational use. However, recent government reports and academic literature have highlighted that improved science uptake into policy is needed to ensure coastal communi...
Chapter
Indigenous peoples are projected to be disproportionately affected by the impacts of climate change. This chapter presents some insights into how the Arabana people, traditional owners of the Kati Thanda-Lake Eyre region, Australia plan to respond to these factors and the journey they took to build their own adaptation strategies. Arabana people ha...
Article
Coastal ecosystems are amongst the most productive ecosystems in the world. Reef-based tourism, one of the multiple uses in coastal zones, has become more important in terms of magnitude and contribution to national economies as well as to the wellbeing of local communities. However, in the absence of proper controls and enforcement, unplanned tour...
Article
Full-text available
This paper focuses on ‘autonomous adaptation’ and has one aim. It assesses the economic consequences of the failure effects of autonomous adaptation in response to extreme flood events. The study found that Bangladeshi farmers are highly resilient to extreme flood events, but the economic consequences of failure effects of autonomous crop adaptatio...
Article
Full-text available
(under review process): The impact-assessment steps adopted in this study were based on IPCC, UNEP and United States Country Study Program (USCSP) guidelines for vulnerability and adaptation. Bawalkor village, five kilometres north of Barguna town, was selected as a region suited to this case study, the area having been affected by storm surges tha...
Article
Conventional systems of government have not been very successful in resolving coastal management problems. This lack of progress is partially attributable to inadequate representation in governance processes of the variety of knowledges present on the coast. In particular there has been a struggle to engage effectively with climate science and its...
Article
Full-text available
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (2007, 2012:11) warned that the mega deltas in South Asia (e.g. the Ganges Brahmaputra Meghna River Basin) will be at great risk due to increased flooding, and the region’s poverty would reduce the capacity of the inhabitants to adapt to change. This paper provides a ‘bottom up’ impact approach w...
Chapter
The coastal zone has multiple institutions, actors and issues. It is also under pressure from climate change and social change. Science is often translated into policy so that multiple pressures are managed in an ad hoc and uncoordinated manner. We argue that in order to ensure science gets disseminated and used in implementation of policy in pract...
Article
The prominence of the coast in terms of the Australian Government’s policy has significantly diminished over the last decade. With the exception of planning for climate change and sea level rise there is an absence of forward thinking for the coast at the national level. This absence of national contribution towards direction setting has a filterin...
Book
Full-text available
The Arabana Climate Change Adaptation project is a collaboration between the Arabana people and the University of Adelaide, South Australia. Arabana people live in the Lake Eyre region, Marree, Oodnadatta, Coober Pedy, Alice Springs, Port Augusta, Adelaide and Darwin. The project was a multi method, cross cultural and interdisciplinary adaptation p...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This project arose from a 2008 [Australian Learning and Teaching Council] ALTC-funded Bachelor of Arts Scoping Project which recommended a number of further studies, including the employability of Bachelor of Arts (BA) graduates. It is evident from the literature that the employability of generalist degree graduates (such as the BA) is subject to d...
Article
The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) raised public awareness of the need to consider climate change in coastal management and gained international recognition when it received a joint award of a Nobel Peace Prize in 2007. The raised awareness of climate change surrounding the work of the IPCC was in l...
Chapter
INTRODUCTION In 1998, the former Departments of Geography and Environmental Studies were merged to create a Department of Geographical and Environmental Studies, which subsequently lost its departmental status in 2002 as part of a University of Adelaide restructuring process. In 2002, Schools became the main administrative units across the Universi...
Chapter
INTRODUCTION The Bachelor of Arts (BA) was the first recognised degree at the University of Adelaide. Although informal classes for some subjects were held at the University between 1873 and 1875, official lectures began in 1876 with a curriculum comprising Humanities subjects that remain an integral part of the Arts degree in traditional universit...
Article
Integrated river basin management (IRBM) emphasizes the need for managing the river as a system irrespective of administrative boundaries. Although IRBM is being adopted for many trans-boundary rivers, progress can be slow, particularly where there is a history of dispute. The Ganges basin in South Asia is one such case that experienced numerous co...
Book
Even though the BA was the first degree it was not until eight years later in 1887 that the Faculty of Arts was inaugurated. In the first 50 years of the University’s existence, less than ten BA students graduated each year. At the start of the 21st century this figure had climbed to over 300 BA graduates per year but what is interesting is that by...
Article
Full-text available
The IPCC, United States Country Study Program (USCSP) and UNEP have formulated vulnerability and adaptation to climate change guidelines where ‘autonomous adaptation’ is being emphasized. Adaptation as a factor of development in the foreseeable future under climate change conditions is crucial in this region. From 1988 to 1998 Bangladesh as well as...
Chapter
DefinitionSeismic refraction. Geophysical research method used to map the subsurface and internal structure of modern coral reefs.IntroductionGeophysical research methods such as seismic refraction and seismic reflection (see Seismic Reflection) techniques have been used to map the subsurface and internal structure of modern coral reefs. These meth...
Chapter
One of the key issues in Australia for sustainable management of the coastal zone is that the science of climate change has not been widely used by decision-makers to inform coastal governance. There exist opportunities to enhance the dialogue between knowledge-makers and decision-makers, and universities have a key role to play in researching and...
Article
Full-text available
Sea-level rise is a major threat facing the Coral Triangle countries in the twenty-first century. Assessments of vulnerability and adaptation that consider the interactions among natural and social systems are critical to identifying habitats and communities vulnerable to sea-level rise and for supporting the development of adaptation strategies. T...
Book
Coastal Management in Australia introduces the background to the various coastal management systems operating in Australia and illustrates these with 'real world' examples from the different states and territories.
Article
This paper identifies four triggers that underpinned the late 20th century reform of coastal management in Australia. These have operated across federal, state and local levels of government. The triggers are global environmental change, sustainable development, integrated resource management, and community awareness of management issues and partic...
Article
Relative sea-level (RSL) history is reconstructed for the Southern Cook Islands since 300 AD using Porites sp. coral microatolls. The upper surface or height of living coral of the modern microatolls on Rarotonga was rigorously determined by 400 laser survey measurements to be constrained by the sea-level − 0.36 m (below Mean Sea Level) with a stan...
Article
An analysis procedure is described for evaluating the properties of storm surge and forerunner waves impinging on the coast during the tropical cyclones in Australia. - from Authors
Article
The Australian coastline is one of the longest and most diverse of any in the world, and Australian researchers have developed preliminary models of the behaviour of major coastal systems such as beaches and reefs. The Australian population is particularly focused along the coastline, especially in metropolitan centres; however, the population of r...
Article
Full-text available
Recent concerns about potential climate-change effects on coastal systems require the application of vulnerability assessment tools in order to define suitable adaptation strategies and improve coastal zone management effectiveness. In fact, while various research efforts were devoted to evaluate coastal vulnerability to climate change on a nationa...
Article
The tidal prism in the River Murray estuary has been reduced by over 85 percent since completion of the barrages in 1940 and regulation has diminished the rate and size of river flows through the estuary. Reduced fluvial flushing has emphasised the dominance of coastal processes at the river mouth. These are expressed in the accretion and stabilisa...
Article
Full-text available
Directly involving the public in environmental decision-making is now a prerequisite for most government agency programs and initiatives. However, ambiguities exist about appropriate methods of engagement and how much public involvement in decision making is a good thing. Public participation is considered to be essential criteria for best practice...
Article
Exotic dune grasses pose a threat to the natural character of land in the vicinity of the mouth of the Murray River in South Australia. Coastal management responsibilities for the mouth are complex, with juxtaposed and in some places overlapping jurisdictions involving three tiers of government. This article examines the threat posed by invasive du...
Article
Full-text available
Marram grass (Ammophila arenaria) and sea-wheat grass (Thinopyrum junceiforme) have been introduced to Australia and New Zealand. This study examines the morphology of incipient foredunes and established foredunes associated with these species at two sites, Mason Bay in southern New Zealand, and the Younghusband Peninsula in South Australia. Both s...
Article
Australia currently has significantly less wind power capacity than Germany, the world leader, but has a much larger land area with considerable untapped wind energy resources. Australia like the rest of the world has experienced a rapid increase in its wind power industry over the last decade, particularly in the southern states, South Australia,...
Article
Coastal evolution following the Holocene marine transgression in South Australia is examined under three contrasting coastal environments: the high-energy, microtidal southeast coast, and the Holocene barrier system of the Sir Richard and Younghusband peninsulas; the sandy deposits of the moderate-energy eastern Gulf St Vincent around the metropoli...
Book
Most of the world’s population lives close to the coast and is highly dependent on coastal resources, which are being exploited at unsustainable rates. These resources are being subject to further pressures associated with population increase and the globalization of coastal resource demand. This is particularly so for the Asia-Pacific region which...
Article
The Holocene sand barrier of Younghusband Peninsula is a modern analogue of older Pleistocene barriers preserved in the landscape in the South East of South Australia. Previous studies undertaken on the coastal morphodynamics and archaeology of this peninsula provide clues to the evolution and age of selected parts of the southern and central barri...